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Vintage fire engine WIP


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#21 Ramfins59

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 03:47 PM

This should be a lot of fun to watch.   Notice Harry isn't building something that has either rear view mirrors or alternator brackets...LOL   :rolleyes:  :lol:



#22 Dragline

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 04:06 PM

This should be a lot of fun to watch.   Notice Harry isn't building something that has either rear view mirrors or alternator brackets...LOL   :rolleyes:  :lol:

 

Funny stuff Rich... :lol:

 

 

Looks like a stellar start Her Pristovnik. I'll be watching.

 

 

Bob



#23 Harry P.

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 04:31 PM

The spark plugs on the real engine are very visible, but there are no plugs in the kit, just the "stick the wire into the hole" approach. That's not gonna cut it. In the photo below you can see how the spark plugs stick out vertically on top of the cylinder heads on the real deal (they're partially hidden behind the horizontal cooling pipe in this photo):

 

sparkplug1_zps18612bd9.jpg

 

I made spark plugs using three different materials. First, the insulators are just short lengths of plastic wire insulation stripped off some fine copper wire (I didn't have any white insulated wire so I used yellow and just painted it white. The electrodes are small brass nails (actually leftover planking nails from a model ship kit), and the terminal ends that the ignition wires will be glued into were made by taking some 3/64 aluminum tubing and crimping the end flat with needle nose pliers. Then I drilled a tiny hole in the flattened part with a pin vise, filed the flattened end to a rounded shape, and cut off the tube, leaving a short length of round tube to accept the ignition wires I'll glue in later. These aluminum terminal ends were then painted brass. For each spark plug I slipped a terminal end onto a brass pin, then the length of wire insulation. The ends of the brass pins will eventually be glued into the holes in the cylinder heads.

 

sparkplug2_zpsf1ea4499.jpg



#24 M0par Jim

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 07:19 PM

I like this build, and will state for the record these are also the kind of builds I really like to follow as well. Harry, you got a viewer here. Keep up the great work! 



#25 Harry P.

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 09:39 AM

A little progress on the engine. The wiring harness was scratchbuilt. The open ends are lengths of aluminum tube, while the "rubber" section is actually black sprue that I bent to shape by heating the sprue over a candle flame until it was soft enough to bend. I got lucky and got the bends correct on the first try (that does not always happen!). The various engine parts have been detail painted (like the silver bands on the magneto) and I added a black wash to all the seams and joints to give the engine some depth and a slightly dirty, used (but not abused) look. I do not want the engine to look factory fresh and as it had never even run. I might tone down the gloss on the cylinders a bit with some Dullcote... not sure yet.

 

engine3_zps7db87792.jpg

 

On the real truck, the ignition wires have that old-timey woven fabric covering, so I tried to simulate that by using thin string for the "wires" instead of smooth vinyl tubing or wire.

 

engine4_zps3d0ac727.jpg

 

And the intake side of things. I added a linkage to the carb which will be hooked up once the engine and firewall are installed on the chassis.

 

engine2_zps464ef8f9.jpg



#26 Harry P.

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 03:17 PM

Here's a tip for you guys. Most of you already know this, but you can never have too many tools. I couldn't have built the engine in the previous photos without tools... and some of my most-used tools are these little guys:

 

tools_zps5c69711c.jpg

 

I found them sold as a set in the jewelry making aisle of Hobby Lobby. They weren't expensive, maybe $10 or so for the set. The set consists of round-jawed, flat jawed and bent needle nose pliers, and a cutter. They're all spring loaded (meaning the jaws open when you release pressure on the handles), they're about half the size of "regular" tools like the full-size pliers on the left, and I couldn't get along without them. If you build without tools like these, do yourself a favor and buy a set. You will not be sorry. Once you have them you'll wonder how you ever got along without them.



#27 Bennyg

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 06:42 PM

This is cool. That engine is awesome.

Ben

#28 cobraman

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 04:19 AM

Yes, that engine looks very nice.



#29 Bigjeff

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 04:39 AM

Very nice work!



#30 Ramfins59

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 07:00 AM

Fantastic work on that engine Harry.



#31 DPink

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 01:22 PM

Is this just a 2 cylinder engine?

#32 Harry P.

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 02:47 PM

Is this just a 2 cylinder engine?

 

It's a four. The cylinders are in pairs, two in each larger "cylinder."



#33 Danno

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 08:18 AM

Sweet.



#34 sjordan2

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 10:31 AM

This illustrates the fine line between WIP and master tutorials that we occasionally see on this forum.

#35 Harry P.

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 05:13 AM

All of the various small parts were removed from the sprues. Mold lines, sink marks and other imperfections were cleaned up, the parts were attached to bits of scrap sprue, and spray painted. Note that every part is attached to its sprue "handle" at a point that won't show on the finished model. The same process was used for various small subassemblies that would all be painted one color. This kit has dozens and dozens of small parts like valves and handles and brackets and things like that... so the process is pretty time consuming. But the payoff is that once the parts come out of the dehydrator, all I have to do is snap them off the sprue handle and install... no further cleanup or touchup needed. This is only a small sample of the parts treated this way...

 

painted-pieces_zps48f1ea53.jpg



#36 Harry P.

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 07:23 AM

The rear brake mechanism was a problem. Out of the box, the rear springs were in the way of the actuator arms. I didn't find that out until I had painted the parts and tried to install them. I had to rebuild the parts using portions of the kit pieces, styrene and aluminum tube, and strip styrene. I had to extend the rods so that they come down outside of the rear springs and don't interfere with them. Since I had to rebuild these parts anyway, I decided to add bolt head detail made of hex-shaped styrene rod:

 

brake-mechanism_zpsf477c456.jpg



#37 Ramfins59

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 07:48 AM

Great work Harry.  I usually use the same method for painting small parts, but I attach the parts to wooden toothpicks or use alligator clips to hold them... whatever works. 



#38 Bennyg

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 08:26 PM

Nice.

Ben

#39 Harry P.

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 12:07 PM

I've been working on the chassis for several days. There are a lot of small parts... all sorts of brackets, linkages, control levers and rods, etc... all of which have to be cleaned up and painted individually before assembling to the frame. Everything is fitting together almost flawlessly... whoever engineered this kit really knew what they were doing. But it hasn't all been trouble free, as I showed you in the above photo regarding the rear brake levers. Another problem I found is with the shifter/handbrake assembly.

 

The floorboard extends out horizontally, beyond the faces of the frame rails... so much so that the molded-in mounting pins on the brake lever assembly are too short; the inside of the assembly contacts the side of the floorboard before the pins reach the frame rail. I found this out after I had assembled and painted the handbrake assembly, but this time the fix was easy. I slipped some short lengths of aluminum tube over the mounting pins, then added some longer pieces of brass rod into the aluminum tube sleeves. These pieces of brass rod are now the new mounting pins. A drop of CA holds the aluminum and brass to the kit piece. All I have to do now is brush paint the aluminum extensions to match the rest of the assembly, and install on the frame rail:

 

handbrake-fix_zps9db1b8c2.jpg



#40 flat-top

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 01:19 PM

Very nice Harry , this is some top shelf model building.