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Vintage fire engine WIP


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#41 Harry P.

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 01:54 PM

Lots of progress on the chassis, about 90% finished. New photos coming tomorrow morning... I'm too lazy to do it tonight!  :lol:



#42 Harry P.

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 06:43 AM

Some progress!

 

This kit is very tedious to build because there are so many small parts that have to be individually cleaned up and painted. And for some reason a lot of parts are molded in halves–for no reason that I can see. They could just as well have been molded in one piece. But because they are split down the middle, that means more parts to clean up and then glue together before painting them as a unit. I have no idea why so many of these parts are molded in two pieces, but that's the way it is. On the plus side, most everything fits perfectly, no reworking or re-engineering of parts needed to get them to fit. However, many of the split parts have no locator pins or any way of positively aligning the halves. You have to line up the halves by eye. And for some reason almost every part has visible ejector pin marks! So a LOT of tedious cleanup on this kit.

 

Here's the chassis so far. Of course, most of the chassis components and detail will never be seen once the bodywork and fenders are in place, but oh well…

 

chassis1_zpse13ffb39.jpg

 

chassis2_zps2999c8ce.jpg

 

chassis3_zps4ef7e417.jpg



#43 Harry P.

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 06:44 AM

Here you can see my reworked rear brake rods and the extensions on the handbrake assembly I added to reach the face of the frame rail. The holes you see in the frame rails are where the fender mounting brackets will go.

 

chassis4_zps414cd79e.jpg



#44 Harry P.

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 06:48 AM

The instructions mention gauge face decals, but there were none in the kit... so I had to hand paint the gauge faces. Not an easy job, as the speedometer is maybe 1/4 inch across! The gauge "glass" is clear 5-minute epoxy. The gold trim on the dashboard's edges is gold BMF.

 

dash_zps411ba360.jpg



#45 Jim B

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 06:49 AM

Very impressive work, Harry.



#46 Harry P.

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 06:52 AM

Here's the rear pump. The gold trim on the rear platform edges, on the pump and on the fire extinguishers is gold BMF. The brass handles on the extinguishers were scratchbuilt of brass rod and sheet styrene, because I thought I lost the kit supplied parts. Of course, after I scratchbuilt the replacements, I found the kit parts... :rolleyes: ... but since I had gone to the trouble of scratchbuilding replacements, I used them! At the upper left of the photo you can see the two valve handles are missing... I only have one, the other one is missing. I'll have to scratchbuild the missing one somehow. Also, the hollow vinyl tube supplied in the kit for the extinguisher hoses and various other hoses was way too stiff. I found some soft rubber tubing in the jewelry making aisle of Hobby Lobby that's just the right diameter, has a nice flat black finish, and is very soft and flexible.

 

I also added a black wash to all of the chassis components, like the large nuts you see here on the pump, for example. Adding the wash adds depth to the details and makes the model look a little less like a model and more like the real thing. I also "dirtied" the chassis, all the undercarriage components, and most of the brass-plated parts by spraying them with my old standby, Testors Transparent Black window tint.

 

pump1_zpsab4375ce.jpg



#47 Harry P.

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 07:05 AM

I know that there are a lot of ways to do a black wash... the Detailer, thinned flat black paint, India ink, etc. Everyone has their own favorite way of doing it. Mine is a "homemade" wash. I can't give you an exact formula, because I just "eyeball" it. It's approx. one part black acrylic craft paint, one part water and one part Future (maybe a bit less on the black paint). If I use only the black paint and water alone, the wash tends to bead up on painted surfaces and doesn't flow well into the nooks and crannies. Adding the Future makes the wash flow nicely and settle into the recesses better.I don't keep a big bottle of it premixed, I mix up small batches as needed.

 

black-wash_zpsc1274103.jpg



#48 Danno

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 07:53 AM

Exceptional. 

 

Going to be epic when she's done.



#49 cobraman

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 08:17 AM

That is coming along very nice. You do good foil work.



#50 Bennyg

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 10:52 AM

Wow. Great progress.

Ben

#51 Tony T

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 11:36 AM

Another way you can break the surface tension of the water is to add a little bit of dish soap. Would accomplish the same as what the future does.

Greta build, Harry!

#52 sjordan2

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 11:42 AM

Well, this is one of your most jaw-dropping builds. I don't know how you made the gauges so crisp. After this, I'd like to see what you'd do with the 1/16 Christie steam fire engine.

Edited by sjordan2, 29 October 2013 - 11:43 AM.


#53 Harry P.

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 03:05 PM

Well, this is one of your most jaw-dropping builds. I don't know how you made the gauges so crisp. After this, I'd like to see what you'd do with the 1/16 Christie steam fire engine.

 

For the gauges I used the tiniest brush I have and a magnifier. And yes, now that I'm into this model I'd like to do the Christie, too.



#54 Danno

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 10:00 PM

Well, this is one of your most jaw-dropping builds. I don't know how you made the gauges so crisp. After this, I'd like to see what you'd do with the 1/16 Christie steam fire engine.

 

 

The Christie was/is 1/12 rather than 1/16.  Not a big issue, but just for accuracy's sake.



#55 PappyD340

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 12:02 AM

AWESOME work Harry, it's coming together very nicely, just waiting for more!!  :) 



#56 Harry P.

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 04:44 AM

Looking at the chassis, I just realized there's no gas tank.  :blink:

 

Did this truck run on magic power?



#57 sjordan2

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 04:49 AM

The Christie was/is 1/12 rather than 1/16.  Not a big issue, but just for accuracy's sake.


Right. That should be very impressive.

#58 Harry P.

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 05:24 AM

Just bought the Christie engine. $45, shipping included.



#59 Harry P.

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 07:09 AM

Here's a little tip for you...

 

I use CA glue a lot when building. Most of the time, I need just a tiny drop, applied to a very specific spot. Trying to use the tube to squeeze out a small drop is almost impssible... it just doesn't give the control I need.

 

I use a homemade CA applicator. All I do is use a flat Dremel sanding wheel to remove the top half of the "eye" of a large sewing needle. That leaves me with a tiny "Y" shaped opening at the end of the needle. I wrap the needle with masking tape to make it easier to pick it up and handle (and so I don't poke myself with the sharp end!  :lol: ).

 

To apply the glue, I place a drop of CA onto a disposable surface (a small piece of paper, plastic coffee can lid, whatever). Then I dip the open end of the needle into the CA, which leaves me with a "just right" drop of the glue suspended between the two "arms" of the open-ended needle. Now I can apply a precise amount of glue to a precise spot without worrying about too much glue spurting out if I used the tube to apply the glue directly. After use, I just wipe off the tip of the needle with a paper towel. If any CA builds up on the tip, all you have to do is scrape off the dried CA with the tip of your X-acto blade and you're good to go.

 

Cheap. Simple. Effective.

 

superglue_zpsd438e99e.jpg



#60 Alyn

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 07:48 AM

Looking at the chassis, I just realized there's no gas tank.  :blink:

 

Did this truck run on magic power?

 

Gas is overated.

 

I have it quite often, and quite honestly, it's a pain in the butt.

 

Nice work so far. Nice tip on the window tint. The photo of the rear pump shows the effect nicely around the bolts.