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superglue vs chrome


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#1 inskeep123

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 01:47 PM

I've used superglue on a couple builds because it holds better than anything I've ever used. When I build motors with mostly chrome and get superglue on those chrome pieces they have this white layer of BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH on it. How do I remove that layer of BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH?

#2 Harry P.

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 02:00 PM

Please post questions in the Questions section.



#3 inskeep123

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 03:03 PM

Where is that? Im new to the forum

#4 cchapman195

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 03:44 PM

Sorry bud, I am not sure how you remove it. As far as I know it is called crazing. As far as I know the chrome is ruined. Super glue does not go at all with chrome or clear parts. I usually scrape the chrome off of a n area not seen then put a small dab of glue and install. Keeping the glue away from chrome. If there is not a place away from the chrome I will put Testers clear parts cement or Testers high gloss clear both take a bit to dry but it will not hurt the chrome. Both clear cement and high gloss clear dry clear so you wont see it if it seeps a little. 



#5 cchapman195

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 04:26 PM

Steve, it looks like I have some testing to do. I have always been told that superglue will not stick to paint or clears and have to be scraped off for it to adhere to parts. I use acrylic paints and future for my top coat clears and have always cleared the paint and clear off for the gluing. This is the first time hearing somebody using superglue over acrylic. I will do some testing and thank you for possibly making my building easier. Always willing to try new things.



#6 MAGNUM4342

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 07:30 AM

O.P.- Please re-read the board rules against swearing and hidden swears.



#7 Jantrix

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 07:56 AM

I've removed it with just a little enamel thinner on a brush. If you are not too aggressive with it, it shouldn't remove the chrome finish.



#8 Art Anderson

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 08:29 AM

I've used CA glue for attaching chrome AND clear parts for a good 25 years or so now, and never have a problem with the "fogging" mentioned here.  I discovered, when I owned The Modelmaker Hobby Shop here in Lafayette, a line of CA glues from Carl Goldberg Models, called Jet and SuperJet.  SuperJet is a medium-viscosity CA glue which is a bit "syrupy", so that it doesn't just run or flow all over the place.  In addition, I discovered an "accelerator" for CA glues (SuperJet is rather slow setting, so an accelerator is needed for quick setting up) from Bob Smith Industries (BSI), which comes in small spray bottles,   BSI Accelerator has made it possible for me to use SuperJet CA glue whenever and wherever my heart desires, and in addition to setting the SuperJet in seconds, ABSOLUTELY prevents the "fogging" which often happens when CA glues set up (CA doesn't set up by drying, it does so by going from liquid to crystalline solid).  In addition BSI Accelerator does not mar or damage any paint I've ever used on a model, nor will it mar or damage "chrome parts", and it does not affect styrene plastic (colored or clear) at all.  In fact, when the Accelerator dries, it doesn't even leave any marks at all. In addition, BSI makes a line of polyethylene accessory tips that fit tightly and leakproof onto the nozzle of a SuperJet bottle.  My favorite tip is the BSI 302 tip, which is a capillary tube which puts the CA exactly where you want it, from tiny drops to puddles.  A quick spritz of BSI Accelerator, and the part is there for the count.

 

Many hobby shops carry both SuperJet and the BSI products, both accelerator and the tips.  In addition, Tower Hobbies (and likely other mail order and online hobby suppliers do as well), and the prices of both are quite reasonable.  I highly recommend both these products--I never work on a model without them.

 

Art



#9 my80malibu

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 08:31 AM

You could try using a method which applies only a small amount of Super glue. Like applying it with a toothpick, you dont need a lot of glue to hold a valve cover, or oil pan on. Once you have your surface prepped for adhesive. if your gluing engines IMHO, it is best to use the Gel Superglue, it offers more working time,fill gaps, and has less chemical burn off, which could be the cause of your Chrome fogging situation.



#10 Pete J.

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 08:47 AM

I have been using Poly-zap from Zap products as my primary super glue for as long as I can remember(and that is a long time ;) ).  I started using is because it was made for clear Lexan R/C car bodies.  It is about the same thickness as Zap-a-gap so it fills a bit, and it is a relatively slow setting glue so you have time to adjust the position of your part.  I have never had a fogging problem with it ever. I have used is on clear and chrome and stuff that has a coat of Future on it.  It also seems to last a long time in the bottle.  I have a couple of bottles that are 3 or 4 years old and it is still good. 



#11 inskeep123

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 01:38 PM

I may have to try the toothpick method. Never thought about that. Thanks for help guys

#12 jbwelda

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 05:58 PM

Try putting a light coat of Future (aka Pledge with Future Shine I think) over that haze and it will disappear. Future (aka blah blah blah) is one of Gods gifts to modellers...you can coat (plastic) glass with it and it will then not react to superglue, or you can use it to do your gluing for you (especially effective on plastic "glass"), or if you fog your glass (or chrome) it will get rid of it with one simple coating, brushed on (its self leveling). In addition you should probably apply less, probably MUCH less, super glue, if it is fogging your chrome parts. a little goes a long way.