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Body filler question


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#1 keone2013

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 08:23 AM

Hi. I was wondering if Bondo body filler is good to use on filling in large gaps?



#2 Harry P.

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 10:28 AM

Yes.



#3 ScaleDale

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 11:14 AM

A two part epoxy putty like Milliput works better because it's stronger.

 

http://www.amazon.co...ywords=milliput

 

Dale



#4 Harry P.

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 11:38 AM

A two part epoxy putty like Milliput works better because it's stronger.

 

http://www.amazon.co...ywords=milliput

 

Dale

 

And also harder to sand smooth. I guess it all depends on the specific circumstance. If you need the putty to also provide structural strength, then yes, an epoxy putty is a good choice. But if you're just filling gaps and not needing the filler to provide structural strength, Bondo is easier to deal with (it sands easier).



#5 Jantrix

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 11:48 AM

Why not fill it in with styrene?



#6 tbill

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 12:49 PM

speaking of putty/filler, what're you all using for an applicator? I've been using a knife, but a 'scale squeegy' would be better. suggestions?



#7 Tom Geiger

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 12:52 PM

Why not fill it in with styrene?

 

Bingo! I was gonna post the same thing.  Lately I've been filling gaps with scrap Evergreen plastic, and gluing it in with Zap-A-Gap.



#8 Old Nasty

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 12:56 PM

I'm always getting these offers in the mail that include a fake plastic credit card.  They work perfectly for spreading putty.  I clean them up with a razor blade when the putty dries. 



#9 crazyjim

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 02:57 PM

The plastic clips on english muffins, lettuce, etc.  Use once and throw it away.



#10 Eshaver

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 05:17 PM

Steve, aka Ole nasty has the idea . Shoot, I bet I get a half dozen of these come on promotions a week from credit card companies , AARP, and insurance companies . I wouldn't do business with any of em. Still, I'll take their "Toy " credit cards to make bondo spreaders with !!!!!!!!!!!



#11 Tom Geiger

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 05:55 PM

I've been working off a box of old business cards.  I have a small open box on the bench where I keep my supply of  putty spatulas that I've cut from these.  They work great. And since they are a porous paper, they also are good for sopping up extra glue. If I find I've put a bit more Zap-a-gap than needed, all I have to do is put the edge of one of these up against it and it soaks right in and off my model!



#12 keone2013

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 06:22 PM

Ok. Thanks guys!



#13 tbill

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 03:04 AM

thank you as well guys. it's amazing how many everyday items get repurposed as model supplies.



#14 Jantrix

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 06:02 AM

 

Bingo! I was gonna post the same thing.  Lately I've been filling gaps with scrap Evergreen plastic, and gluing it in with Zap-A-Gap.

 

Try a solvent glue like Tenax or Plastruct liquid. It melts the plastic into the gap and then there is no glue to sand away, just plastic. Some guys will even use Tenax or MEK to create a slurry of melted styrene and spread it like putty. When it re-hardens, it's all just plastic, no ghost lines.



#15 Tom Geiger

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 06:27 AM

and for tiny imperfections and scratches I fill those in with primer.  I take my standard Duplicolor grey and spray a little in a small bathroom cup. I let it sit for a while so it starts to dry and gets thick.  Then I'll take a little and dab it over the spots I need to fill. I overdo it, leaving a bit of a bubble because it will lose a lot as it dries, and even then it will sand at the same rate at the rest of the primer around it.  Works well for fine prep.



#16 Eshaver

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 08:58 AM

Tom, the reason I got away from any kind of a "lacquer type " putty was on account of shrinkage over time . Even on my 1-1 work, I am now seeing imperfections on a Raven Black, ( Ford ) paint job I did back in the late 80's . Yeah, while that may seem like an eternity to many , painting a panel truck requires at least two gallons of paint minimum . Anyone want to go price decent automobile paint lately ???



#17 Jeremy Jon

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 09:03 AM

Ed's exactly right, shrinkage is an issue!

 

Personally, I would fill as much as possible with styrene/plastic first, so then you are only filling a minimal amount as possible, thus avoiding cracks developing, as the filler material, even polyester based bondo will do this, continue to dry and shrink even after being sanded and painted



#18 plowboy

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 10:26 AM

I fill large gaps with sheet styrene. I have everything from .005 up to .040 thick. I use Tamiya's extra thin cement to glue it in with. Anything smaller than .005 gets filled with crazy glue.



#19 kilrathy10

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 01:37 PM

Yep...I agree with using styrene....I've never gotten very good results with putty....Not saying bondo and other stuff is a bad idea, but I did used to take Testors liquid glue and cut up old sprues into little 1/8" pieces and dropping a bunch of them in half a bottle's worth....After about 24 hours, you have a plastic putty that you can reseal and use at any time.....



#20 Skip

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 06:57 PM

Starbucks, Barnes & Nobel... any Gift Cards. Once they are tapped out they become putty spreaders. I think I've got a stack of 20 of them, people even give me theirs when theirs are done. Once people know that you use them for something it seems like there is an endless supply, and that's just from family members!

I also agree with using styrene to fill major holes and gaps. You wouldn't use putty to fill holes in the metal on a real car would you? Well, some of the old cars I've worked on sort of indicate some people would!! Do the job right and make some sort of patch panel when it's too big for Bondo alone.

I know some people don't like it and it's a holdover from monster, Roth's Monsters and Weird-Oh's kits. I like using Zap-A-Gap thick super glue and tinted Baking Soda as a filler it can fill some pretty large voids. The other favorite that's good for seam filling is Zap-A-Gap and Zap-Kicker. I have models in my collection and other's collections that are nearly 20 years old without cracking, flaking or distortion using super glue. It primes just like the base styrene. I use a small hypodermic needle to control the application of the kicker. I've used the super glue, baking soda and kicker over primer before with no ill effects on/in the paint. It doesn't stink up the hobby room and half the house like Bondo either, don't get me wrong I still use Bondo. Like tools fillers have their uses, strengths and weaknesses. Match the filler to the application. Some people are intolerant to CA Glue fumes too, just be careful with any chemical in your modeling arsenal you can become sensitive to almost any chemical with enough exposure.