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Safe Upper Temperature For Resin?


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#1 Canada Jeff

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 09:05 AM

Hello all.

I have a bit of an odd question here. How hot can cured resin safely get? For example, if you had a resin part that you wanted to scuplt something else on using that Sculpey polymer clay, would the resin piece stand up to the head of the oven when you tried to cure the Sculpey?

For the sake of argument, let's say you're trying to sculpt a custom wide body kit out of Sculpey on a resin car body. The actual application I am wondering about is an off-topic figure modeling project, but you guys know more about resin than anybody else I've found.

What happens to cured resin at high temperatures? Does it become pliable? Does it melt? Does it give off toxic fumes? If anybody out there has experience with heating cured resin parts, I'm all ears.

Thanks in advance.

#2 Aaronw

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 09:17 AM

What happens to cured resin at high temperatures? Does it become pliable? Does it melt? Does it give off toxic fumes? If anybody out there has experience with heating cured resin parts, I'm all ears.


Yes


many people put resin parts in hot water to rebend warped parts, hot water from the tap is typically 120-140 degrees, so quite a bit lower than most ovens low heat. I've warmed silicone molds in the oven (its supposed to improve casting quality) and the residual resin in them stinks up the house which is why I don't do that anymore.



Probably your best bet to do what you are describing is use a two part putty. I have some stuff called magic sculpt that is a resin putty, you kneed the two parts together and it gives you about 30 minutes working time. There are others out there as well, many of the fugure builders use something similar but I don't know the brands. You might even be able to use that water proof epoxy for plumbing, it comes as a ribbon 1/2 blue 1/2 yellow, you cut off the size you need then mush it together until it turns green. I've never worked with that stuff but it is a putty, definately experiment first though, it probably has a short working time since its made to plug leaky pipes and such.

Edited by Aaronw, 26 November 2007 - 09:21 AM.


#3 Aaronw

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 09:24 AM

Here is a link to the 2 part putty I have.

http://www.tapplasti...ct.php?pid=110

#4 Canada Jeff

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 10:41 AM

Hmmm... I was afraid of that.

Two part putty was my first thought, but I like the almost unilmited working time of Sculpey instead of being "on-the-clock" with two part putty. I'm not a great sculpter, so I would like to take my time. I guess I'd rather fight the clock and work quickly than fill the house with potentially toxic fumes and ruin some perfectly good resin parts. I've used Tamiya's two part putty as well as Miliput before, and each have their disadvantages.

Thanks for the feedback. Not quite the answer I was hoping for, but better safe than sorry.

Cheers.

#5 monkeyclaw

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 04:20 PM

Eveybody will give you a different answer here....I use BONDO for all of my sculpting...it is quick and easy; sculpts very easily using cheese grater files and, dremel or sanding....works in warm or cold weather...as it generates it's own cure reaction....just my 2 cents.......matt burnett