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Shelby Cobra CSX2128 4/25/14 Update


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#1 afx

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 01:13 PM

Its March 1963.  Shelby is anxiously awaiting the delivery of three new 'Cobra' chassis from AC Cars Ltd.  These new chassis will form Shelby's team entry for the 12 hour of Sebring.  One of those chassis is CSX2128.  The Cobra has already been created when Shelby shoe horned Ford's 260 cid V8 into AC's Ace chassis.  By doing so he created a very good sports cars.  The 260 cid engine delivered Shelby's first race win in chassis CSX2026.  However these three new chassis will receive Ford's newest weaponry, the 289 HiPo as they came to be known.  These events will set the Cobra on the path to racing legend.


Edited by afx, 25 April 2014 - 03:59 PM.


#2 afx

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 02:26 PM

The wire wheels that AC had been delivering on the cars was able to cope (barely) with the power of the 260, but a Weber carbureted, race tuned, Shelby prepped 289-not happening.  So these three new chassis (CSX 2127, 2128 & 2129) would the first to receive Halibrand mag wheels (of the kidney bean variety) mounted on Goodyear Blue Streak racing rubber (Shelby was also a Goodyear dealer).

 

The wheels are from Historic Racing Miniatures and the tires are Dunlop Racing for Perry's Resin. Not correct but they have the correct shape and size for this car.

photo6-vi.jpg


Edited by afx, 26 April 2014 - 12:07 AM.


#3 afx

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 02:42 PM

The Halibrands added strength, but also allowed larger tires to be mounted.  In order to accept the larger tire the wheel wells needed to be radiused, the rears in particular.  In addition, to comply with FIA regulations that the tire not project beyond the edge of the fender, flares were added.  Most early Cobras also had the driver side door reshaped to allow the driver more arm movement.

 

The base kit is AMT.

 

photo1-vi.jpg

photo1-vi.jpg


Edited by afx, 26 April 2014 - 12:08 AM.


#4 bryan_m

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 02:54 PM

lookin good!

 

are you going to open the doors as well?

 

cheers

bryan



#5 afx

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 03:24 PM

lookin good!
 
are you going to open the doors as well?
 
cheers
bryan

Thanks Brian. Not opening the doors, going true vintage were the driver just jumps over the door.



#6 afx

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 03:51 PM

The interiors were virtually stock. The only changes were the addition of a racing seat for the driver,  a roll bar and various switches.  The rules required a passenger seat with seat belts.  The seat (slight modified) comes from Monogram's GT-350R or the Owens Corning Corvette.  Switches and warning light are turned aluminum from Sakatsu. Fire extinguisher from the parts box.

photo1-vi.jpg

 

 

Roll bar is modified kit part.  

photo1-vi.jpg

 

 

The foot boxes on the cars are fiberglass. To simulate this I sand the these parts with corse sand paper and then leave them unpainted.  I think it represents the texture and finish of fiberglass much better.

photo2-vi.jpg


Edited by afx, 26 April 2014 - 12:11 AM.


#7 cobraman

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 05:48 PM

Oh boy, oh boy, a Cobra  !  I will be watching !



#8 slusher

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 09:55 PM

Nice start. Interior looks great..



#9 crazyrichard

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 11:49 PM

nice!!!!! looking great .. makes me remember i need to build my cobra kit :)

#10 Tukkerdax

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 01:54 AM

You got  my attention too !!



#11 jaydar

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 05:42 AM

I am watching. Thanks for sharing your build.
Joe.

#12 250 Testa Rossa

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 08:39 PM

I am so excited to see how this will turn out. 



#13 afx

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 08:39 AM

 

lookin good!
 
are you going to open the doors as well?
 
cheers
bryan

Thanks Brian. Not opening the doors, going true vintage were the driver just jumps over the door.

 

Brian, I realize now why you thought I might be opening the doors.  Something I like to do on my Cobra builds is remove the inner door panels from the interior down to the map pocket.  The when the interior is installed you can see the inside sheet metal of the door.  This is a better representation of how the race car interiors were finished. This 1:1 photo also shows the modified driver's door.

Attached Files


Edited by afx, 21 January 2014 - 09:51 AM.


#14 Speedfreak

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 09:57 AM

Great thread JC! Great racing history here, thanks for adding that. Build looks great. What kit did you start with? I have the Monogram Essex Wire 427 Cobra on my short list (within the next year? lol) I'm actually looking at the box now. This thread will help.



#15 afx

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 10:03 AM

Great thread JC! Great racing history here, thanks for adding that. Build looks great. What kit did you start with? I have the Monogram Essex Wire 427 Cobra on my short list (within the next year? lol) I'm actually looking at the box now. This thread will help.

Thanks Gene, this build is based on AMT's Cobra, which is correct for the '62 & '63 Cobras, both 260 & 289 versions.


Edited by afx, 21 January 2014 - 10:07 AM.


#16 afx

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 03:21 PM

Here the engine has been installed in the completed chassis.  The engine is Historic Racing Miniatures "FIA Engine".  Its 1/24 scale but with just a little massaging it fits AMT's 1/25 scale just fine.  The headers are scratch built, as is the expansion tank. Radiator hoses are bits of household wiring insulation.  Hose clamps are bits of twisted copper wire.

photo-vi.jpg

photo-vi.jpg

 

 

Here's a "top tip".  After cleaning up the parts assemble the entire chassis including the suspension (No engine or radiator of course).  Paint the inner fender panels aluminum.  Mask them off and paint the rest of the chassis semi-gloss black. This way you are not trying to assemble painted parts.  Much cleaner and stronger assembly.  I also like to add a strip of .010 styrene to the top of the outside frame rails.  This helps to strengthen them as they are somewhat fragile.

photo-vi.jpg

photo5-vi.jpg


Edited by afx, 26 April 2014 - 12:16 AM.


#17 cobraman

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 04:10 PM

Coming along nicely.



#18 Cato

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 06:25 PM

JC,

With all due respect to your excellent building skills and neatness, here are some constructive tips to improve this and your next Cobra(s).

There is a ton of picture reference on these cars and their small block engines and it's easy to find. The Webers in particular are a focal point and getting them right makes the model. Here's just one view of a Comp car and how the Webs are plumbed and linked:

http://webersb_zps2acd866c.jpg

The fuel lines terminate in banjo fittings and come from the fuel block (which you represent but note the 1:1 is actually an aluminum manifold casting, part of the radiator hose pipes. ). Note the thickness of the fuel lines and the plug wire. The plug wires are only 7mm in 1:1. Note the throttle linkage and bell crank on the footbox. From there to one set of butterflies and from that to a central bellcrank in the center of the intake, connecting the other three. Views are readily available.

You have some 'mystery wires' twisted together going from somewhere to nowhere. Cobras are simple. Find reference to the coil, fuel pump (on the block) and the puke tank on the firewall with hoses to the valve covers. They are all wired and plumbed simply so they are easy for you to duplicate. The coolant overflow tank also needs improvement and it's not hard. The upper rad hose is not all rubber-it's cast aluminum pipe with rubber connectors.

BMF would make better hose clamps and might be easier than twisting your wire. And no copper plumbing of any type was used on these cars.

You could also make real aluminum (instead of paint) inner fenders using .005" baking pans from the supermarket. Make a tape or paper template and glue in place on the panels. Use it for the throttle bellcranks too. Even the trunk would benefit from that.

There are other accuracy issues with these kits, like the exhausts and windshield frame and glass to name two. In general, styrene models are too thick in many places compared to 1:1. A builder of your skill can really nail these cars given the right reference.

Hope that helps.

 

 

 

 

 



#19 afx

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 03:30 AM

JC,

With all due respect to your excellent building skills and neatness, here are some constructive tips to improve this and your next Cobra(s).

There is a ton of picture reference on these cars and their small block engines and it's easy to find. The Webers in particular are a focal point and getting them right makes the model. Here's just one view of a Comp car and how the Webs are plumbed and linked:

http://webersb_zps2acd866c.jpg

The fuel lines terminate in banjo fittings and come from the fuel block (which you represent but note the 1:1 is actually an aluminum manifold casting, part of the radiator hose pipes. ). Note the thickness of the fuel lines and the plug wire. The plug wires are only 7mm in 1:1. Note the throttle linkage and bell crank on the footbox. From there to one set of butterflies and from that to a central bellcrank in the center of the intake, connecting the other three. Views are readily available.

You have some 'mystery wires' twisted together going from somewhere to nowhere. Cobras are simple. Find reference to the coil, fuel pump (on the block) and the puke tank on the firewall with hoses to the valve covers. They are all wired and plumbed simply so they are easy for you to duplicate. The coolant overflow tank also needs improvement and it's not hard. The upper rad hose is not all rubber-it's cast aluminum pipe with rubber connectors.

BMF would make better hose clamps and might be easier than twisting your wire. And no copper plumbing of any type was used on these cars.

You could also make real aluminum (instead of paint) inner fenders using .005" baking pans from the supermarket. Make a tape or paper template and glue in place on the panels. Use it for the throttle bellcranks too. Even the trunk would benefit from that.

There are other accuracy issues with these kits, like the exhausts and windshield frame and glass to name two. In general, styrene models are too thick in many places compared to 1:1. A builder of your skill can really nail these cars given the right reference.

Hope that helps.

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for taking the time to comment on my build Cato.  I accept the criticism on the scale discrepancy related to the fuel lines. The very fragile resin fuel log drove the size of these lines.  I should probably have used larger diameter coated wire and just stripped the ends.  Next time.  The mystery wires are a fuel return line and electrical wires coming from the relay on the inner fender.  They will be properly terminated on the completed model.  They do not terminate at the transmission as they appear to in the photo.  Are the electrical wires to large-yes.  The coil is located correctly for the particular chassis I am building.  The fuel pump is plumbed to the fuel log. CSX2128 did not run with a puke tank connected to the valve covers.  Below is a picture of CSX2129 for reference.    I do extensive research on my builds.  Every Cobra was a little different. If you really want to build an accurate model you must select a particular car (chassis number) to model.   I like your idea regarding the backing pans, but aluminum finished BMF applied to the inner fender panels might be easier.  I chose to paint them. If you look at the underside view of the chassis you will see that I made an effort to thin these panels.  This is the only location on the completed model that the thickness of the panels is apparent.  The side exhaust dump pipes will be scratch built-stay tuned. Again Cato thanks for checking out my build.

Attached Files


Edited by afx, 22 January 2014 - 03:34 AM.


#20 Cato

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 05:08 AM

The mystery wires are a fuel return line and electrical wires coming from the relay on the inner fender.  They will be properly terminated on the completed model. 

To the best of my knowledge, Weber motors did not use a return line to the tank since they run at ~3psi of fuel pressure. Seen on 2129 is an AN line from the log to the fuel gauge on dash (very risky). Does your reference of 2128 show a return line?

Also, what is the cylinder above the battery?