Jump to content


Revell announces new line of snap kits


  • You cannot reply to this topic
99 replies to this topic

#21 Tom Geiger

Tom Geiger

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,489 posts
  • Location:Exton, PA
  • Full Name:Tom Geiger

Posted 17 February 2014 - 01:06 PM

 

Its sort of like these guys act like its an elite club and you better like to build what they do, and have the same interest as they and have the same opinions about everything else in life , the entire mindset of the hobby is bad, and that is not going to be very inviting to younger builders. 

 

Agreed. Those of us who build in different categories can feel that.  If you build factory stock or drag cars, you get loads of positive feedback when you post your builds.  Those who build sports cars, light commercial etc, not so much.



#22 Lownslow

Lownslow

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,842 posts
  • Location:West Side Chicago
  • Full Name:Frank Rizzo

Posted 17 February 2014 - 02:17 PM

 
If he's talking about dollars, it is pretty stagnant across the board - car, planes, armor, US companies, import companies, whatever.  It's just that today we're selling fewer units but they're more expensive kits. You sell 10,000 at $20,  20,000 at $10, or 5,000 at $40, it's all the same.  That's been the trend in the industry, fewer units but more advanced and thus more expensive kits.  I just don't think Revell has gotten that much more advanced while they've certainly gotten more expensive. To be fair to them US car modelers have traditionally been the most reluctant segment to accept more advanced and thus more expensive kits - but we'll see how the Meng F-350 does to see if maybe that has changed.  The times it was tried before (Accurate Miniatures' Can-Am McLarens and Corvette Grand Sports and Galaxie Ltd's 46 Chevy) didn't really have the sort of broad subject appeal that the F-350 has. 
 
Maybe they think by bucking the trend and going simpler (with the snap kits and by simplifying construction with the pre-paints), they'll attract new modelers, but I'd be remiss not to mention that pre-paints have been tried several times before and have never really panned out.

im talking in a subject matter sense, revell an r2 might reel them in but how are they gonna keep them reeled in?

#23 lordairgtar

lordairgtar

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,803 posts
  • Location:Muskego Wisconsin

Posted 17 February 2014 - 02:23 PM

 

The funny thing is, too, is that when the Galaxie LTD Chevys and Accurate Miniatures Grand Sport kits were first released, their suggested retail prices were about that of what a standard Revell glue kit is today. I don't think the prices of the Galaxie kits have changed much, either.

 

I still think both companies would've been more successful had they chosen subjects with broader appeal as their initial ventures.

Although I have a limited income, I never balked at the AM and Galaxie prices. I own three AM Vettes and two and one half Galaxie Chevys. I saved up, then bought them. When the Meng Ford kit comes out, I will buy that one as well, regardless of cost. I even have the pricey ICM Opel. Funny how people who complain about these choices are also the first to jump up on the Tamiya (or whatever Japanese company) band wagon over what are essentially expensive curb sides (with exceptions of course) and  sing to high heaven their praises.



#24 Danno

Danno

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,986 posts
  • Location:Okay. By now you all know ~ Aridzona.
  • Full Name:Nameless Natural Luminary

Posted 17 February 2014 - 02:45 PM

Funny how people who complain about these choices are also the first to jump up on the Tamiya (or whatever Japanese company) band wagon over what are essentially expensive curb sides (with exceptions of course) and  sing to high heaven their praises.

 

 

:lol:  Agreed.  :rolleyes:


Edited by Danno, 17 February 2014 - 02:45 PM.


#25 Muncie

Muncie

    MCM Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 80 posts
  • Location:Pacific Wonderland
  • Full Name:Steve Payne

Posted 17 February 2014 - 02:47 PM

Noticed that Revell announced new kits on twitter today, they are called Revell Essentials, essentially pre decorated snap kits, kind of a step up from snap kits as they will require glue, no clue on how detailed they'd will be. new kits will be the 2013 ZR1 Camaro, 2013 Challenger, and 2015 Mustang

I'm kind of liking the subject matter - is it OK if I build them, too...

 

This is a good thing - something the kids can build without much supervision and some subjects that we will like.



#26 Ron Hamilton

Ron Hamilton

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,579 posts
  • Location:Bowie, MD
  • Full Name:Ronald Hamilton

Posted 17 February 2014 - 03:50 PM

Kudos to Revell for making this move. While the concept and subject matter does not appeal to me, there is a place for them amoung us "serious" modelers. Can you say "slump buster"? The concept looks to be similar to the original pre-painted Polar Lights' '65 Coronets and '64 GTO's, only using contemporary cars in their line which are already tooled-up. In the right color with a decent finish, I may be in for a couple myself.

#27 1972coronet

1972coronet

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,438 posts
  • Location:Murrieta (South-West Riverside County) , Ca
  • Full Name:John Shoe

Posted 17 February 2014 - 04:08 PM

Yes ! "Slump-Buster" is another great way to look at these kits ! That's another great point .



#28 Dave

Dave

    MCM Friend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 181 posts
  • Location:Elkin, North Carolina
  • Full Name:Dave Sciano

Posted 17 February 2014 - 05:46 PM

I think it's a great idea that Revell is trying. I'm curious to see what the prices will be though.  I've often seen kids looking at kits in the LHS  only  to be turned away by mom or dad once you start adding up the prices, kit, glue, maybe  bottle of paint.  Hopefully there will be a few different colors for each kit too. Two kids, two colors, etc...



#29 Austin T

Austin T

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,575 posts
  • Location:TN
  • Full Name:Austin Tyler

Posted 17 February 2014 - 05:55 PM

I think it's a great idea that Revell is trying. I'm curious to see what the prices will be though.  I've often seen kids looking at kits in the LHS  only  to be turned away by mom or dad once you start adding up the prices, kit, glue, maybe  bottle of paint.  Hopefully there will be a few different colors for each kit too. Two kids, two colors, etc...

Working in a hobby shop I can tell you firsthand that most parents put the kit back on the shelf when told they need paint glue and other supplies. They don't really want to spend more than the 20 bucks for the kit.


Edited by Austin T, 17 February 2014 - 05:56 PM.


#30 Scuderia

Scuderia

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,531 posts
  • Location:Michigan
  • Full Name:Lawrence Greene

Posted 17 February 2014 - 05:58 PM

Yeah I can see price being an issue for sure, but I might check em out and see what's cookin



#31 Chuck Most

Chuck Most

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,140 posts
  • Location:Ithaca, Michiganistan
  • Full Name:^See Above

Posted 17 February 2014 - 05:59 PM

AMT/Round2 (or 'DoAllSer' as the insiders call it) have already done the Camaro ZL1, not sure why Revell would do that also.   Now the '14 Z-28 would be interesting to see...

DoAllSer is the Chinese molding company Round2 contracts to mold their kits- nobody refers to Round 2 as DoAllSer... :huh: They're two completely different companies.



#32 Rob Hall

Rob Hall

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,188 posts
  • Location:Phoenix, Arizona
  • Full Name:Robert Hall

Posted 17 February 2014 - 06:02 PM

DoAllSer is the Chinese molding company Round2 contracts to mold their kits- nobody refers to Round 2 as DoAllSer... :huh: They're two completely different companies.

I know, I know.. I mentioned that because a certain 'insider' was throwing that name around once in a thread like we were all supposed to know it..(it's just trivia that really means nothing)


Edited by Rob Hall, 17 February 2014 - 06:08 PM.


#33 Chuck Most

Chuck Most

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,140 posts
  • Location:Ithaca, Michiganistan
  • Full Name:^See Above

Posted 17 February 2014 - 06:15 PM

I know, I know.. I mentioned that because a certain 'insider' was throwing that name around once in a thread like we were all supposed to know it..(it's just trivia that really means nothing)

I got that... just putting it out there more for the benefit of guys like that than you. B)



#34 Rob Hall

Rob Hall

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,188 posts
  • Location:Phoenix, Arizona
  • Full Name:Robert Hall

Posted 17 February 2014 - 06:20 PM

 

Oh, I think I'll come out and say what Brett so diplomatically tried to get across....

The average American car modeler is a whiney cheapskate!  

Yes, that's just the way it is..whiners gonna whine, haters gonna hate.  I don't understand why the hobby is a magnet for cheapskates..I don't see that in other pastimes/interests I'm involved in.



#35 Chuck Most

Chuck Most

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,140 posts
  • Location:Ithaca, Michiganistan
  • Full Name:^See Above

Posted 17 February 2014 - 08:12 PM

Yes, that's just the way it is..whiners gonna whine, haters gonna hate.  I don't understand why the hobby is a magnet for cheapskates..I don't see that in other pastimes/interests I'm involved in.

I've wondered that exact same thing myself- or the guy will splurge in one area or another to offset a 'pricey' kit. (IE- the modeler will buy top-notch, brand name paint and never spend more than ten bucks on a kit, no matter how nice it is, or vice versa). I see it this way... Which is cheaper.... building a model the way you want it, or building the 1:1 the way you want it? Looking at it from that perspective (as I do) I'd say car modeling is a pretty cheap hobby. I'm just hoping what James says holds true- that these will have better chassis detail than the AMT Showroom Replicas series. If the '10 Mustang Convertible snap kit is any indication, I'd say there's nothing to fear in that regard.

 

 Funny how people who complain about these choices are also the first to jump up on the Tamiya (or whatever Japanese company) band wagon over what are essentially expensive curb sides (with exceptions of course) and  sing to high heaven their praises.

Thank you! I'm just sick of hearing of the supposed superiority of Tamiya models in general... on average, they're no better or worse than any of the other Japanese kit manufacturers (in fact I'd say I generally favor Fujimi kits over Tamiya kits as far as Japanese kits go, though Aoshima is giving them all a run for their money these days), nor are they much better or worse than anything produced by any other kit manufacturer from any other country. Unless you're talking Ferraris- Tamiya has great Ferrari kits down to a science. :)  Tamiya has quite a few shining stars... and their share of stinkers, same as everybody else. Sure, they get the body and interior details right most of the time, but you're paying for that with simplification elsewhere in most places. Weird how companies like Revell get bashed for simplified subassemblies, but when Tamiya does it, nobody bats an eyelash...



#36 martinfan5

martinfan5

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,374 posts
  • Location:Los Santos, San Andreas
  • Full Name:Jonathan Stephens

Posted 17 February 2014 - 08:28 PM

Well, my guess is that is because Tamiya kits generally pass the "sit on the shelf and look like the 1:1 vehicles they are supposed to represent" test with flying colors, and with Revell kits, that's very much a hit-and-miss proposition these days. I know I would have no problem with simplified subassemblies in Revell kits if it meant them getting the bodies right on a more consistent basis.

Let me add to this ,  one other thing is that people expect that , or they know that  is how a good portion of kits from the Japanese companys are going to be.


Edited by martinfan5, 17 February 2014 - 08:29 PM.


#37 Chuck Most

Chuck Most

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,140 posts
  • Location:Ithaca, Michiganistan
  • Full Name:^See Above

Posted 17 February 2014 - 08:47 PM

Well, my guess is that is because Tamiya kits generally pass the "sit on the shelf and look like the 1:1 vehicles they are supposed to represent" test with flying colors, and with Revell kits, that's very much a hit-and-miss proposition these days. I know I would have no problem with simplified subassemblies in Revell kits if it meant them getting the bodies right on a more consistent basis.

True enough- Revell doesn't have much trouble with late model vehicles, but their '50's - '70's kits can be a bit iffy. (Of course I'm talking about recently tooled kits of subjects of that vintage, not actual Revell tooling from that time.)  I'd still be willing to bet that if Tamiya were to produce a kit of the current Mustang, it would not be as good as the existing Revell kit, even though the Tamiya fanboys would never allow anyone to hold that opinion. Tamiya doesn't do early "domestic" subjects, so there's really no way to tell if, for example, a '70 Barracuda or '69 Nova done by Tamiya would be any better than the Revell versions. All I know is that traditionally speaking Tamiya's kits of North American subjects have always been compromised, but you're right about them looking like the real deal on the shelf.  I'd have to agree 100% with your way of thinking regarding simplification vs. overall accuracy. A great engine and chassis don't really mean much when there is either one big flaw or a series of little ones with regards to the appearance of the body, but I can live with a curbside kit that looks the part if that's the only choice I've got.



#38 Brett Barrow

Brett Barrow

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,267 posts
  • Location:Deep in the swamps of Jersey
  • Full Name:Genius billionaire playboy philanthropist Brett M. Barrow, Esq.

Posted 18 February 2014 - 04:24 AM

I know, I know.. I mentioned that because a certain 'insider' was throwing that name around once in a thread like we were all supposed to know it..(it's just trivia that really means nothing)


I refer to the "showroom replicas" line of unassembled promos as DoAllSer because the promo contract was done directly with them while AMT was still in limbo during the RC2-Round2 transition. DoAllSer is one of several (5?) factories that are used to produce Round2's lines of products.

#39 blubaja

blubaja

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 578 posts
  • Location:NJ
  • Full Name:Francis Xavier Tiewski 3rd

Posted 18 February 2014 - 05:45 AM

 

 

    Tamiya recognized long ago that North American subjects weren't its strong suit, which, I am guessing, is why it has done so few of them and hasn't done any in, what, 15 years, at least?

Tamiyas Jeep Wrangler and Grand Cherokee were amazing kits. Very well detailed. Their 90s Mustangs were great also. I wish they still did more US subjects. But when Revell tried to make the Impreza, the rear c pillar was way fubar. So yes, I would choose a foreign company over Revell any day because I don't have to worry about the body looking all wonky. 



#40 blubaja

blubaja

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 578 posts
  • Location:NJ
  • Full Name:Francis Xavier Tiewski 3rd

Posted 18 February 2014 - 05:46 AM

Working in a hobby shop I can tell you firsthand that most parents put the kit back on the shelf when told they need paint glue and other supplies. They don't really want to spend more than the 20 bucks for the kit.

And it sucks, they'll drop $60 on a stupid video game. This hobby just isn't going to work with this new generation.