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New Model T series


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#61 jbwelda

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 01:45 PM

>Most automobiles of this era had folding windshields--the upper part being hinged at the frame, so as to be folded forward,

>down on top of the lower pane.   There are lots of contemporary pictures of open cars (and the VAST majority of automobiles

>prior to the advent of inexpensive closed body styles were open bodies) showing this.

 

ok Art thanks for the info though in all honesty that's not at all what I asked, and its probably a case of not reading my post very carefully. I am well aware of windshields in which the upper part is hinged and folds forward and down...onto the VERTICAL piece of glass below.

 

you might note I emphasized the word "vertical". you might also note the lower glass in the photo above as well as the box art is not vertical. you might also note some other disparities from what I, at least, thought I "knew" about these windshields (in my case very little).

 

thanks again!

 

jb



#62 lordairgtar

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 09:07 AM

Oh brother.



#63 Craig Irwin

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 01:10 PM

Any projected release dates?



#64 niteowl7710

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 06:51 PM

The 1912 Roadster is first and it's tentatively scheduled for July.

#65 Danno

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 06:16 AM

Kewl!  Looking orward to it.  It'll look great next to my MENG F350!



#66 Eric Macleod

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 11:33 AM

Danno,

 

I used to tow my '26 Touring with a Ford F-350. All you need is the Galaxy trailer and you would have it made! Like my 1:1 trailer, you probably could fit two complete '12 T's inside one trailer!



#67 Danno

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 05:02 PM

Great idea, Eric.



#68 dimaxion

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 08:14 AM

I build Factory Stock . Like VW's , unless you know these Vehicles , you can't decearn one year from another . Both made "Running Changes" during Production . If the change was lucky enough to happen at the same time as the Competition offered up New Model Year , so be it . If not true , so be it . The latter years with the Costs of not including US Government mandates changed this practice for VW . I am looking forward to new Model T's I cannot scratch build or Modify . I will most happily add these to my String .. Thanx ..   



#69 Art Anderson

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:27 PM

The 1912 Roadster is first and it's tentatively scheduled for July.

Given that ICM is located in Ukraine, I'm wondering what effect, if any, all the mess over there is having on the company?  (fingers crossed).

 

Art



#70 Art Anderson

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:32 PM

I build Factory Stock . Like VW's , unless you know these Vehicles , you can't decearn one year from another . Both made "Running Changes" during Production . If the change was lucky enough to happen at the same time as the Competition offered up New Model Year , so be it . If not true , so be it . The latter years with the Costs of not including US Government mandates changed this practice for VW . I am looking forward to new Model T's I cannot scratch build or Modify . I will most happily add these to my String .. Thanx ..   

John,

 

With the Model T, you are most correct:  There was no such thing as an annual, model year change in the Model T--changes, both mechanical and appearance-wise, happened as they happened, which makes certainly "brass era" Model T Fords to date just by looking at them.  "Sheet Metal Joe"(Galamb, Ford's stamping wizard back then) comes up with a newly shaped, less expensive to produce set of front fenders?  They got put into production as they happened, rather than holding off for a specific time of the year so they could be announced as being "new".  In fact, there were almost no announcements of styling changes until the "1926" Model T's were introduced.

 

Art



#71 Eric Macleod

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 04:31 PM

Has anyone heard anything about a release date on these yet? I looked at the manufacturer website and found nothing.



#72 carsntrucks4you

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 03:29 AM

ol Henry will be avaiable in 1/24 from ICM http://www.icm.com.u...-3-figures.html. Thats an ideal addition to ICM 1913 Ford Model T Roadster. They also annouced an 1910 Model T Tourer.

 

Cant wait to see the first Model T conversions as a Hot Rod or Pickup etc.



#73 Atmobil

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 06:20 AM

This looks really cool. I am also looking forward to the new Model T kits. I got the 38 Opel Admiral from ICM and it looks like a great kit.



#74 Matt T.

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 02:42 PM

Very neat!

#75 Craig Irwin

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 02:43 PM


Cant wait to see the first Model T conversions as a Hot Rod or Pickup etc.

 

That will be unique because most rodders use the newer T's, cool thought.



#76 Paul H

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 11:51 AM

Details of the 1912 T roadster kit (including pics of the sprues) here:

 

http://www.icm.com.u...senger-car.html



#77 lysleder

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 07:58 PM

That is neat! Looks like the steering wheel rim and spokes are molded separately! It could be a challenge just to get the rim out of the tree without breaking it  :wacko:

 

I also note that the tires are made out of off-white (I suppose) soft plastic. I applaud having new manufacturers venture into car territory bringing with them new ideas on how to do it.



#78 Art Anderson

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 07:34 AM

That is neat! Looks like the steering wheel rim and spokes are molded separately! It could be a challenge just to get the rim out of the tree without breaking it  :wacko:

 

I also note that the tires are made out of off-white (I suppose) soft plastic. I applaud having new manufacturers venture into car territory bringing with them new ideas on how to do it.

I doubt the tires are soft plastic, given the sprue.  As for "white tires", those are a modern misconception:  Early automotive (and even bicycle) tires were made from natural latex rubber, which is a cream color until vulcanized, which turned it a very light buff, or a "creamy tan" color.  Carbon black only began being added to latex rubber about 1910-11 or so, which didn't make the latex rubber black, but rather a gray color, the darkness depending on the concentration of the carbon added.

 

Camera film, even the black & white emulsion used on glass plates for photography back then, tended to photograph otherwise colored objects with very stark contrasts between light and dark, mostly due to the slow speed of exposure.  That made those buff-colored tires stand out as starkly white in photographs, while the colors of cars, regardless of how bright, came out very darkly, some almost black.

 

Now, over time, with exposure to sunlight, those old latex tires would bleach out nearly white, but by the time they did that, the rubber was so dried out, deeply checked, that the tires were unusable anymore.

 

Art



#79 Art Anderson

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 07:40 AM

That is neat! Looks like the steering wheel rim and spokes are molded separately! It could be a challenge just to get the rim out of the tree without breaking it  :wacko:

 

I also note that the tires are made out of off-white (I suppose) soft plastic. I applaud having new manufacturers venture into car territory bringing with them new ideas on how to do it.

As for any difficulty removing that steering wheel rim from the sprue--the Opel Admiral kit steering wheel is made in the same manner, but I had absolutely no problem removing the rim from the sprue surrounding it.

 

This feature will make painting the steeering wheel correctly very easy, BTW.  Very early Model T's had steering wheel hub and spokes in a one-piece brass casting which was later replaced by a forged iron unit.  The brass spokes and hubs needed regular polishing, where the forged iron unit was painted black.  The wheel rim itself is made from segments of wood, glued together with dovetailed joints,   I'm not quite sure how the wooden rim was finished, but at any rate, they ended up a pretty dark brown in color.

 

Art



#80 charlie8575

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Posted 20 December 2014 - 04:32 AM

Impressive.

 

Charlie Larkin