Jump to content


Pocher Rolls Sedanca


  • You cannot reply to this topic
390 replies to this topic

#41 Pocherphile

Pocherphile

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Location:North Carolina
  • Full Name:Rick Hensley

Posted 08 March 2014 - 10:27 AM

If I were to build a Pocher RR today, the above mentioned parts would be the 1st parts I purchased, but then again, that is me.

The Pocher kits @ todays cost and effort invested to build.........deem all one can do to make them as strong as one can and as correct as can be done.

But again, I stress, this is just my idea and it is not my wallet taking the hit..........f/this reason, Pocher Rolls or Benz is way back on my burner @ this time because of the amount of funds required for such a project.......I have not even hit upon a display case! :o

Rick


Edited by Pocherphile, 08 March 2014 - 10:28 AM.


#42 Harry P.

Harry P.

    MCM Ohana

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,334 posts
  • Location:NW suburban Chicago
  • Full Name:A mere layman...

Posted 08 March 2014 - 11:47 AM

These are examples of the endless flash, stubs, sinks and holes that need expanding or you break screws. They take a long time to get prepped...

 

The Pocher screws are very brittle, and trying to force them to go into the hole will result in a snapped-off screw head about 90% of the time.

 

Much easier to use the "melting" method. You start the screw in the hole, just enough to get the thread started, then touch the screw head with the tip of a hot soldering iron while gently pushing. The screw will heat up enough in just a few seconds that you will be able to use the tip of the soldering iron to push the screw home. You eliminate reaming out about a bazillion holes to accept the kit screws, yet the screw can still be removed if necessary (the hot screw melts its own threads into the plastic).



#43 Harry P.

Harry P.

    MCM Ohana

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,334 posts
  • Location:NW suburban Chicago
  • Full Name:A mere layman...

Posted 08 March 2014 - 11:52 AM

As far as the kit tires go... if you are buying Marvin's replacement set because you think they look better, that's your call. But if you're buying them because of their advertised flexibility and ease of installation (Pocher kit tires are notoriously stiff and almost impossible to slip onto the completed wheel), you can get Pocher tires to behave very easily. Put a tire into a small bowl of water and zap it in the microwave until the water starts to boil. Depending on the size of the bowl and the microwave's power, about a minute and a half.

 

The tire will be very flexible and soft, and can be easily pulled onto the rims. Better to go with a shorter time in the microwave to start... if the tire is still too stiff, back into the microwave for another 20-30 seconds or so. 



#44 Cato

Cato

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,526 posts
  • Location:Eastern East Coast
  • Full Name:See below:

Posted 08 March 2014 - 12:09 PM

Great tips Harry-keep 'em coming.

Yes I went for the tires because I didn't like the Dunlop sidewalls. And yes, I followed your (and Paul Koo's) earlier advice to melt the screws in. It's only tedious but yields perfect results every time. Haven't broken a one or cracked the brittle plastic.



#45 Harry P.

Harry P.

    MCM Ohana

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,334 posts
  • Location:NW suburban Chicago
  • Full Name:A mere layman...

Posted 08 March 2014 - 02:13 PM

Tedious? You don't know tedious until you start building those wire wheels!



#46 f1ford48

f1ford48

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 308 posts
  • Location:northern california
  • Full Name:Frank Schaeffer

Posted 08 March 2014 - 02:30 PM

YIKES- these Pochers don't sound too builder friendly.



#47 Cato

Cato

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,526 posts
  • Location:Eastern East Coast
  • Full Name:See below:

Posted 08 March 2014 - 02:41 PM

YIKES- these Pochers don't sound too builder friendly.

Only to talent-challenged guys like me. :(



#48 Cato

Cato

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,526 posts
  • Location:Eastern East Coast
  • Full Name:See below:

Posted 08 March 2014 - 02:57 PM

Tedious? You don't know tedious until you start building those wire wheels!

I did six of 'em on the Alfa remember?

But that was when I could see straight... B)



#49 Pocherphile

Pocherphile

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Location:North Carolina
  • Full Name:Rick Hensley

Posted 08 March 2014 - 02:58 PM

Do not let what you read make you afraid of a Pocher kit, I have seen 12 year olds build them and if they can, you can.  Of course I am talking back when you could buy them @ K-mart f/$35.00, does anyone here remember that.  If only I had of know then what I know now!

Story goes, Pocher is about to shut their doors.........a certain person gets wind of this, orders everything he can get from them (Pocher), seem he filled up a warehouse with Pocher kits.  Something happened, he had to move this warehouse full of Pocher kits, he sold them to a buyer from K-mart f/pennies on the dollar.......K-Marts stocked them and sold them dirt cheap.  Bought a Rolls, a Benz and a Alfa for alittle over $100.00 + tx.......... :o

If I had a Time Machine, I would buy them out @ every K-Mart I could find, and put them babys back for a investment.

Now to add to the insult of this, Pocher was still mfging kits and for along time, no Pocher kits were imported to the USA until Model Expo convinced them to let them sell the kits again........that was the last time you could order a Pocher kit from here in the US.

I believe Polk's of NY also sold them during the early 80's.

I keep reading this and that, Pocher kits are coming back......yadda, yadda.....albit, you can buy the new kit hawked as Pocher, but is really from a mfger in Spain that bought the rights to Pocher's name!  Or so the story goes.  Anyway, Pocher kits are not for everyone, that is for sure.......but, if you love modeling, classic cars and working with multi-type materials......do yourself a favor and @ least, try one......I bet you will love it.  PS: Spoke wheels, are they daunting, yes, impossible, no.......and when you are done, you will set and smile from ear to ear that you beat those suckers........MMC's Builders Guide has a great tip on them as well.

Rick   aka Pocherphile B)

 

tip: stubby screwdriver, works wonders for setting spoke nipples w/o damage, and sets the nipple DC.


Edited by Pocherphile, 08 March 2014 - 03:05 PM.


#50 Cato

Cato

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,526 posts
  • Location:Eastern East Coast
  • Full Name:See below:

Posted 08 March 2014 - 03:29 PM

Great history of opportunity missed. When I bought the Alfa, I think it was $139.

Great tip too-download your tips here. Not just for me but hopefully this thread will convince some guys to try one.

And yes, sadly, the cost of admission is high these days. but I did OK on the 'bay last year when I bought this.

Luckily, it was as advertised minus some minor corrosion.

But no warps!!!



#51 Pocherphile

Pocherphile

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Location:North Carolina
  • Full Name:Rick Hensley

Posted 08 March 2014 - 04:06 PM

Great history of opportunity missed. When I bought the Alfa, I think it was $139.

Great tip too-download your tips here. Not just for me but hopefully this thread will convince some guys to try one.

And yes, sadly, the cost of admission is high these days. but I did OK on the 'bay last year when I bought this.

Luckily, it was as advertised minus some minor corrosion.

But no warps!!!

One went this week on eBay for less than $400.00, (RR) mint, un-started in box..........was on my watch list and sold before I had a chance to check and see what it was doing, if not, that bad boy would be coming to NC. :(



#52 Cato

Cato

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,526 posts
  • Location:Eastern East Coast
  • Full Name:See below:

Posted 08 March 2014 - 04:10 PM

One went this week on eBay for less than $400.00, (RR) mint, un-started in box..........was on my watch list and sold before I had a chance to check and see what it was doing, if not, that bad boy would be coming to NC. :(

Yikes-I paid a bit more last year and it wasn't mint but complete and unassembled. Still happy I got it.



#53 Harry P.

Harry P.

    MCM Ohana

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,334 posts
  • Location:NW suburban Chicago
  • Full Name:A mere layman...

Posted 08 March 2014 - 04:40 PM

The best kit for someone wanting to try their first Pocher classic kit is the Fiat. Relatively simple to build, yet looks pretty good. No wire wheels to build, no doors to hinge, etc. And fairly cheap (by Pocher standards). The toughest part is building the drive chains link by link, just like a 1:1 chain. Definitely the "entry level" Pocher classic kit.



#54 Pocherphile

Pocherphile

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Location:North Carolina
  • Full Name:Rick Hensley

Posted 09 March 2014 - 08:59 AM

The best kit for someone wanting to try their first Pocher classic kit is the Fiat. Relatively simple to build, yet looks pretty good. No wire wheels to build, no doors to hinge, etc. And fairly cheap (by Pocher standards). The toughest part is building the drive chains link by link, just like a 1:1 chain. Definitely the "entry level" Pocher classic kit.

I agree 100%, but I have also noticed a trend taking place on eBay.........a FIAT can go for as much as one of the bigger kits, so for a 1st time build, yes the FIAT is outstanding as a introduction to Pocher kits, but @ the same time, if I can buy a RR for what a FIAT cost.......... ^_^

I once had a 1st production run of the FIAT and it was the only one I ever got this way, it came with the chains assembled from the factory.........they were in their own little plastic case, assembled and covered in what looked to be a thin coat of oil.  The next kit came with the chain to be assembled w/a metal plate to hammer the parts on, 3rd and this current kit came with chain to assemble, but the metal plate is now plastic........ <_<

Just funny how things change!

Rick



#55 Harry P.

Harry P.

    MCM Ohana

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,334 posts
  • Location:NW suburban Chicago
  • Full Name:A mere layman...

Posted 09 March 2014 - 09:04 AM

The Fiat generally goes for around $400-500, sometimes less. Way less than any of the other Pochers kits. There's one there right now for $500 or best offer.

 

I built the version where the chain parts are metal and you have to assemble every single link and roller... just like a real chain. I remember that being a somewhat less than enjoyable process... :lol:



#56 Pocherphile

Pocherphile

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Location:North Carolina
  • Full Name:Rick Hensley

Posted 09 March 2014 - 09:26 AM

The Fiat generally goes for around $400-500, sometimes less. Way less than any of the other Pochers kits. There's one there right now for $500 or best offer.

 

I built the version where the chain parts are metal and you have to assemble every single link and roller... just like a real chain. I remember that being a somewhat less than enjoyable process... :lol:

Yes sir, there is one f/$500.00 or BO, but if one watches, other kits can and do go for lesser amounts..........a Rolls just went w/ship for less $300.00, complete and un-started, in box!  Its just being @ the right place @ right time.  I agree w/you, the FIAT is a better choice f/1st build, but I am a working blue collar and I like to get the most bang for the dollar........so I do look for the better deals, if a FIAT is going Buy Now f/$500.00 and a RR or Benz is available for the same or lesser amount (agree, not very oft, and yes there are none @ this moment, though some good buys are there if one watches and keeps up with them).......then its a no brainier! :lol:  I also now look for started/built examples, these can be had for a song and parts can be sourced.    I guess I am a bottom line guy when it comes to Hobby Dollars.

Rick



#57 Cato

Cato

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,526 posts
  • Location:Eastern East Coast
  • Full Name:See below:

Posted 09 March 2014 - 09:51 AM

The Fiat generally goes for around $400-500, sometimes less. Way less than any of the other Pochers kits. There's one there right now for $500 or best offer.

 

My Sedanca came for $535. Holding the parts in hand and seeing condition of this early version car, I'm pleased I got a decent deal.



#58 Cato

Cato

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,526 posts
  • Location:Eastern East Coast
  • Full Name:See below:

Posted 09 March 2014 - 12:17 PM

When working on a long, drawn-out project like this, I get a psychological boost seeing the main frame all in primer.

After thorough dry, mock-up again and a rub with 600 grit:

17Medium_zps2ce2f4f4.jpg



#59 Pocherphile

Pocherphile

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Location:North Carolina
  • Full Name:Rick Hensley

Posted 09 March 2014 - 02:26 PM

Look'n good there ole buddy.  Looks like you took care of all the wonderful sink marks that Pocher kits seem to just be full of.

Keep it coming,

Rick B)



#60 Harry P.

Harry P.

    MCM Ohana

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,334 posts
  • Location:NW suburban Chicago
  • Full Name:A mere layman...

Posted 09 March 2014 - 02:54 PM

Look'n good there ole buddy.  Looks like you took care of all the wonderful sink marks that Pocher kits seem to just be full of.

Keep it coming,

Rick B)

 

Of course, once the kit is built, you'd never see any of those sink marks. They'd all be hidden from view by the fenders and running boards. Just sayin'...

 

With a Pocher kit (or any kit, for that matter), you have to pick your battles. Spending endless hours tending to things that won't be seen on the finished model isn't my idea of time well spent. For me, I'd spend my time and effort on getting the body panels aligned, the interior looking good, etc. Stuff you see when the model is on the shelf.

 

But that's just me. Your opinion may vary...  ^_^