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1/18 Duesenberg wire wheels


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#21 slusher

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 03:51 AM

Wheels are very impressive...



#22 dino246gt

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 04:09 AM

Stunning!  You ARE crazy, just like most of us!  Awesome work!



#23 ewaskew

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 04:12 AM

That's some great detailing there, looks very nice.

God Bless



#24 Skypower

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 07:20 AM

Beautiful work you do, very talented we are blessed to now have another exceptional builder in our mist. I love learning from builds like yours thanks for sharing.



#25 58 Impala

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 09:59 AM

Nice job on your build, the wheels look great. They make the whole model really pop. I would be the type of person to try doing the wheels like that. I find doing tedious details relaxing.

Edited by 58 Impala, 08 March 2014 - 09:59 AM.


#26 ChrisBcritter

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 10:53 AM

As others here have, I've considered this same method for improving wire wheels, and this proves it can really work! The rest of that chassis is amazing as well. Hope to see the finished car here soon.

 

I found normal modeling tools such as files, chisels, bench grinders, and sledge hammers worked well.  :wacko:

Now I don't feel so bad about the fistfight it took to put together one of their Model A kits when I was eleven...


Edited by ChrisBcritter, 08 March 2014 - 05:03 PM.


#27 TomN

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 12:13 PM

Hi Bob

Beautiful work on the wheels...inspiring too! So inspiring I just bought the same kit on eBay!

 

It will have to wait a while, into armor modeling at the moment. I remember your Stuart from AMPS in Indiana,

what an amazing model! I took lots of pics.

 

I'm assuming you painted the whitewalls, may I ask what you used? It looks perfect!

 

Any chance you will be at AMPS 2014?

 

Thanks for the inspiration!

Tom



#28 BSteinIPMS

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 06:22 AM

Hi Bob

Beautiful work on the wheels...inspiring too! So inspiring I just bought the same kit on eBay!

 

It will have to wait a while, into armor modeling at the moment. I remember your Stuart from AMPS in Indiana,

what an amazing model! I took lots of pics.

 

I'm assuming you painted the whitewalls, may I ask what you used? It looks perfect!

 

Any chance you will be at AMPS 2014?

 

Thanks for the inspiration!

Tom

 

Hi Tom,

 

Thanks for the kind words regarding the wire wheels and my 1/6 scale M5A1 Stuart; much appreciated! I wrote a book published by Schiffer on that build which you may be aware of and which is still available:

http://www.amazon.co... armor modeling

 

And yes, the whitewalls were masked off and airbrushed with White Ensign Models White. This paint comes in the little tinlets that Humbrol uses and may very well be the same paint. I carefully selected this particular white since it was the first white paint I laid my eyes on when I looked at my paint shelf. Not any more scientific than that, I'm afraid.  :unsure:  To keep the paint from cracking while I flexed the tires over the Chrome-painted rims, I sealed the white with an airbrushed satin mixture of Testors Glosscote and Dullcote. So far, so good.

 

I won't make it to AMPS in 2014, I'm afraid. I'm too busy teaching two teenage drama queens how to drive. It's okay to feel sorry for me.  :lol:

 

Cheers!

--Bob



#29 LWBNomad

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 08:33 AM

Fantastic work!!!!  I, too, am building one of these old Hubley Duesenberg kits and I have been planning to make wheels much the way you have just done (I just purchased .015" music wire & drills yesterday). Thank you for sharing your results - and blazing a trail for me. I can't wait t see the final results of your build.

 

It's taken many hours of labour to clean up these horrid old metal castings, and I'm not finished yet. I'm sure my wife thinks I'm crazy. But the results will be worth it. 

Attached Files


Edited by LWBNomad, 22 March 2014 - 08:35 AM.


#30 Mizozuman2

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 10:14 AM

Duesenberg SJ LeBaron Dual-cowl sweep panel phaeton.

 

If that's not a mouth full of a car name, I don't know what is! LOL

 

Great looking wheels too!



#31 ChrisBcritter

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 02:06 PM

Got my .015 wire today too; probably will try to do the stock wheels for my Monogram '34 Ford cabriolet. It'll either look good or it may just put me in the room with the rubber walls once and for all.



#32 BSteinIPMS

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 03:17 PM

There's a lot you can do to the underside as well if you want to invest the time. You can always cut the hood lengthwise and install working photoetch piano hinges that operate realistically. You just have to decide if: 1.) You want to spend the time and effort, and.....2). You come to the realization that you're really not very well....

:wacko:  :lol:

 

018-Copy_zps31d39172.jpg

 

024-Copy_zps3e1f3735.jpg

 

025-Copy_zps17012b91.jpg

 

026-Copy_zpsd8e24d4f.jpg

 

Cheers!

--Bob


Edited by BSteinIPMS, 22 March 2014 - 03:22 PM.


#33 lanesteele240

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 04:37 PM

Man you have a awesome build going on. Looks great.

#34 TomN

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 09:27 AM

Hi Bob

More amazing work for sure!

 

Hope you don't mind lots of question...

 

I was going to ask if you had any plans to hinge the hood, but I see you are already there. How did you attach the hinge to the hood?

 

What photo etch did you use for the mesh on the hood?

 

Is that an aftermarket grill? Or the kit part?

 

Are you writing a book about this?

 

Oh, and please stay not very well, lol!

 

Thanks,

Tom



#35 LWBNomad

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 02:15 PM

I'm wondering if there are drawings somewhere for a Duesenberg that might have dimensions for the details you've added to the chassis? Since acquiring this kit, I've been sort of struggling with how far to go with improvements to the basic Hubley architecture. I think they got the proportions and stance correct but, of course, they abbreviated the detail as it just was not expected in the early sixties, not to mention price point and all the commercial considerations. Correcting the wheels is a major step, but I should like to go further than that. How far is the question.

 

I had this kit when I was about 15 or 16; built it out of the box, painted it green just like the box illustration and loved the car. But it was too big to go with me when I left home and that one is lost to history. I bought the phaeton AND the town car kits on ebay just a while ago. Doing the Phaeton first.


Edited by LWBNomad, 23 March 2014 - 02:15 PM.


#36 BSteinIPMS

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 10:06 AM



Hi Bob

More amazing work for sure!

 

Hope you don't mind lots of question...

 

I was going to ask if you had any plans to hinge the hood, but I see you are already there. How did you attach the hinge to the hood?

 

What photo etch did you use for the mesh on the hood?

 

Is that an aftermarket grill? Or the kit part?

 

Are you writing a book about this?

 

Oh, and please stay not very well, lol!

 

Thanks,

Tom

 

Hi Tom,

 

I don't mind questions at all, so fire away. To answer your current ones:

 

1. The piano hinges were glued to the three hood panels with CA glue, then strips cut from the photoetch fret were cemented along each side of each hinge to clean them up visually as well as to more firmly anchor them down to the hood panels. I used JB WELD to fill in depressions in the casting and also to blend in the hinges to the hood. Despite cleaning up the hinges visually, they aren't visible from the inside when the hood panels are open on the model, just visible on the outside. Where I think they look very good.

 

027-Copy_zpsc1219dd8.jpg

 

2. The brass photoetch mesh/screening/grill work is from Plano Model Products, found in the railroad section of my hobby shop. Or you can find their various photoetch products online.

 

3. If you are referring to the grill on the hood panels, the chrome side screens given in the kit had their centers cut out and replaced with the brass screen for better visual appeal. It's not a perfect pattern match for the real Duesenberg, but it looks close and is far better than solid plastic. If you mean the main radiator, it's the kit part with the chrome plating stripped off.

 

4. I'm not writing a book, but I am hoping to interest Gregg Hutchings at MCM in an article on this build.

 

5. I haven't been very well all my life, and it's much too late to change now!  :lol:

 

Cheers!

--Bob


Edited by BSteinIPMS, 24 March 2014 - 10:19 AM.


#37 BSteinIPMS

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 10:17 AM

I'm wondering if there are drawings somewhere for a Duesenberg that might have dimensions for the details you've added to the chassis? Since acquiring this kit, I've been sort of struggling with how far to go with improvements to the basic Hubley architecture. I think they got the proportions and stance correct but, of course, they abbreviated the detail as it just was not expected in the early sixties, not to mention price point and all the commercial considerations. Correcting the wheels is a major step, but I should like to go further than that. How far is the question.

 

I had this kit when I was about 15 or 16; built it out of the box, painted it green just like the box illustration and loved the car. But it was too big to go with me when I left home and that one is lost to history. I bought the phaeton AND the town car kits on ebay just a while ago. Doing the Phaeton first.

Hi Stan,

 

There are several avenues open to you for dimensional data on the Duesenberg. One is the ACD (Auburn Cord Duesenberg) Museum in Auburn, Indiana. Their reference library is stuffed with blueprints, drawings, photos, and data. It can get a bit spendy purchasing items from them, though. If you're a member - like me - you'll get a 10% discount on anything you buy from the store.

 

http://www.automobilemuseum.org/

 

Another avenue is the ACD Club (online forum): http://forums.acdclu...hpbb2/index.php

 

Next, you can do a google image search for whatever you're looking for, and this can be used to good effect.

 

Last, if you have the stomach for it, check out Louis Chernot's 14-year build of a Duesy at the Internet Craftsmanship Museum:

 

http://www.craftsmanshipmuseum.com/

 

http://www.craftsman....com/Chenot.htm

 

Cheers!

--Bob



#38 LWBNomad

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 11:22 AM

Thank you for the information, Bob! I love your work! Please post more as you progress.



#39 TomN

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 11:38 AM

Hey Bob

 

Thanks for the info, Plano huh, never thought of them...and I'm into trains too!

 

Was cutting the top of the hood a difficult job? Hint, hint...how did you do it?

 

I picked up the Duesenberg town car on eBay for a good price, now I see that the radiator is the kit part. Are you planning to use Alclad for all the chrome?

 

I'm thinking I'd like to do the Packard Roadster, if I ever get around to building on of these, keeping my eye on eBay.

 

Looking forward to more of your progress,

 

Tom



#40 BSteinIPMS

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 07:14 AM

Hey Bob

 

Thanks for the info, Plano huh, never thought of them...and I'm into trains too!

 

Was cutting the top of the hood a difficult job? Hint, hint...how did you do it?

 

I picked up the Duesenberg town car on eBay for a good price, now I see that the radiator is the kit part. Are you planning to use Alclad for all the chrome?

 

I'm thinking I'd like to do the Packard Roadster, if I ever get around to building on of these, keeping my eye on eBay.

 

Looking forward to more of your progress,

 

Tom

Hi Tom,

 

I cut the hood longitudinally (lengthwise on my miniature table saw, a 30-second job. A hacksaw would make too wide a kerf, but an X-ACTO razor saw might do the job if the teeth on the saw blade hold out.

 

Yes, Alclad II Chrome for all the stripped chrome parts in the kit. You can check out Alclad's Website for lots of good information.

http://alclad2.com/

 

The Chrome requires an airbrushed gloss black base coat for best effect, and an airbrushed top coat of Alclad II Aqua-Kleer Kote Gloss is suggested if you're going to handle the Chrome-painted parts much.

 

Cheers!

--Bob