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Can brass tube be annealed for bending?


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#1 LDO

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 03:11 PM

I want to build a brass chassis and need to make a few full circles of 1/4" K&S tubing. It's a large scale lakester chassis.

Thanks. Lee

#2 Art Anderson

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 04:30 PM

Most certainly, any K&S brass can be annealed--just heat up to dull red, let cool, and it's softened.  But I would wonder, would it not be easier to anneal and bend 1/4" brass rod, seeing as how the very thin-walled K&S tubing is very prone to breaking (as in tearing apart) if bent at sharp angles.

 

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#3 LDO

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 04:44 PM

I'll find out.

Thank you.

#4 my80malibu

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 05:33 PM

You could fill the tube with fine sand, or table salt. After Anealing, to keep it from collapsing during bending. Just be sure to pack it full, and seal or cap the ends with wax. Or something suitable.



#5 jwrass

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 12:07 AM

I have bent larger tubing with the sand method and it worked well. I have also used spring type benders on larger refrigeration copper tube and that works great. I saw at Hobby Lobby smaller spring type benders made by K&S



#6 astroracer

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 03:24 AM

LDO, if you are painting the chassis use 1/4" copper tubing for your difficult bends. It will solder to the brass just fine.
Mark

#7 LDO

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 03:50 AM

The two main hoops will be close to 4.5" o.d. I'm hoping that will be a gentle enough bend for brass. Maybe copper for the smaller hoops. This is not a replica of an existing car, but a model of a lakester I would like to build.

#8 Pete J.

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 04:50 AM

I would go along with the brass rod recommendation. If there is no visible indication that it is hollow then why put yourself through the hassle of trying to bend tubing? It is like using wire for gas or brake lines. You can't see the inside so don't worry about it.

Edited by Pete J., 30 June 2014 - 04:50 AM.


#9 LDO

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 06:59 AM

It would definitely be easier to mill a fish mouth onto rod, rather than thin wall brass. My concern would be keeping the heat from melting nearby solder joints. I might need to come up with some sort of heatsink.

#10 jwrass

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 07:46 AM

Lee, Their used to be some really good products our there for heat sinks, however Gov regulations put a end to most of the good stuff. I think the Eastwood Co has a product.

 

On of my guys who works for me (HVAC) makes his own brew and most of his co worker have a container on their service trucks because it works really well, I have used it too and it really does work well.

 

Their is no magic recipe it's shredded paper and baking soda (Sodium Bicarbonate) S.B. is a fire retardant and is used in fire extinguishers. His Mix has the consistency of oatmeal or paper mache.

 

I can't take credit for this one, but it does work and it's cheep $$$$$$ jwrass



#11 LDO

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 08:57 AM

That sounds good. I was thinking of some sort of clip-on metal heat sink. No reason not to use both.

I have "Cool Gel"; a spray gel that we plumbers use when soldering. I suppose I could use it and mix in some shredded paper. I definitely need to get a smaller torch, though. Maybe even break out the resistance soldering outfit I got for a song on eBay. The seller misspelled "resistance" and I got it for $36.

#12 jwrass

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 10:49 AM

Lee, I have seen the gel, I have no experience with it but the trade rags tout it. If that's Weller you got for $36 do you sleep at night :D

 

I have a 260 watt Weller and that thing gets pretty hot, I have a small Weller butane (still in the package that's all I can tell you about it) I would try the resisthhhhjh first.

 

I am very curious about this subject, seems like each time I go to the hobby shop I grab some brass or copper of some description. I have sweat (brazed) many a refrigeration fitting and plumbing pipe too.

 

I have not played with any of the materials I have.

 

I have had good results with Harris Stay-Silv flux and Oatey paste (red) not so much with the self tinning stuff. keep us posted (me anyhow) as I am very interested. jwrass