Jump to content


Candy Paint Jobs/Hot Rods..


  • You cannot reply to this topic
20 replies to this topic

#1 10thumbs

10thumbs

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 323 posts
  • Location:Florida Boy, living in Europe..
  • Full Name:Michael Dalton

Posted 02 July 2014 - 06:23 AM

Hi guys,

 

Since my 64 Color Me Gone Dodge is just about finished (needs decals), I'm planning my next model.  Since I need some simple hands on refresh time, I want to do a kit that pretty much OOTB.

 

So, a Revell 32 Ford gets the call.  I'll use a different engine though, but I want a real snappy paint job.

 

Is candle apple red a possibility for an average Joe type painter like me?

 

Any hints from painters here?

 

Thanks,

Michael



#2 High octane

High octane

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,720 posts
  • Location:Midwest
  • Full Name:Nick

Posted 02 July 2014 - 06:32 AM

Yes, I just finished a "candy paint" job 'bout a week ago using "rattlecans" and it came out great. I'm havin' trouble postin' pics on this site, so no pic. Use a base coat over your primer such as silver or gold and let it dry for a day or so. Then apply your candy color coats in LIGHT coats and go a bit heavier on your final coat. TOO many coats will come out a solid color and your basecoat will not show through. I've seen a candy red paint job come out maroon because the builder put on too many coats of candy red. I hope this helps.

 

You could send me a PM with your e-mail addy and I could send you some candy pics if you'd like.



#3 10thumbs

10thumbs

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 323 posts
  • Location:Florida Boy, living in Europe..
  • Full Name:Michael Dalton

Posted 02 July 2014 - 07:29 AM

Hi Nick,

 

I've tried a bunch of plastic spoons, great tip by the way. The spoons are white.  I've  tried different shades of primer, or in this case just a covering coat of paint, grey, flat red, 3 different golds, and just using the white plain plastic without any pre-painting.

 

You write "use a base coat over your primer"...and let it completely dry out.  What is the color of the base coat?  Do you mean silver or gold as a backgound for the candy color to be used?  Be it blue or green or red.  Just asking to clear up, and to get detailed info.

 

I'm not even sure I need a primer, or is the primer a must, even if the plastic is flawless?

 

Michael



#4 High octane

High octane

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,720 posts
  • Location:Midwest
  • Full Name:Nick

Posted 02 July 2014 - 07:46 AM

I did say base coat of silver or gold, and I usually use a light coat (like Tamiya) of white primer over the bare plastic. I only use grey primer if I'm spraying silver or black over it. The primer will make the next coat (base) grab onto it.



#5 10thumbs

10thumbs

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 323 posts
  • Location:Florida Boy, living in Europe..
  • Full Name:Michael Dalton

Posted 02 July 2014 - 08:03 AM

OK....got it.

 

Michael



#6 jwrass

jwrass

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  • Location:Waterford
  • Full Name:James W Rasmussen

Posted 02 July 2014 - 09:34 AM

Michael,

 

I have done many full on 1:1 Kandies (I like Hoks nomemclature for Candy) and some models when I was kid with rattles. If you go with rattles that's up to you!!! I'm sure many get good results with them but I wouldn't go down that road if you want jaw dropping results. I guess the first question I would have to you is do you own a airbrush or small touch up type spray gun?

 

One of the first things you need to know about Kandies is that it's formula is clear and toner (color) nothing more nothing less.

 

My approach on a model would be the same as 1:1

 

Lay down your base coat, Silver, Gold, Pearl Black, Pearl White and this is one that I rarely share Copper!!! Any color can be used as a base the most traditional are Silver and Gold.

 

Larry Watson and Dean Jefferies ( west coast painters) were known for their deep rich Kadie Apple Red paint work, No one could figure out how they were doing it, their secret was in the copper base coat, it gives kandies a warmth and depth like no other base coat especially red.

 

I know this will sound like arduous task but this is what I would do to get a show winner.

 

1) Lay down your base to get full and even coverage 2 to 3 coats should do it. Adhere to recommended flash times between coats. Tack between coats 

 

2) Lay down 2 wet coats of intercoat clear, again adhere to flash times and let that dry for a few days. Tack between coats

 

3) Wet sand ( with Ivory dish soap classic scent in the water, this is pretty much the standard soap used by custom painters as the scent is organic and not a perfume, perfumes contain oils, oils equal fisheyes) the intercoat clear with 800-1000 grit paper. dry the surface and follow with a grey scuff pad dry to make sure the surface is dull. CAUTION is a must in this step as you don't want to sand into the base coat, you can fix it but it's a hassle, just take your time it's not a race 

 

4) Clean the surface with a pre paint prep product.

 

5) Lay down 3 to 4 medium coats of Kandie paying attention to gun control and overlap, overlap should be 50 to 75 percent. Adhere to flash times

 

6) Now cut your mixed Kandie 50% with a reduced compatible clear and lay down one medium wet coat. Adhere to flash times.

 

7) Now cut your mixed  Kandie 75% again with the reduced clear and lay down one medium wet coat and let that flash.

 

8) Lay down two wet coats of Clear over the Kandie. Adhere to flash times. I use a two part clear but that's not necessary for a model.

 

9) Wait a few days wet sand with 1500,2000,or finer and buff. don't forget to add the soap to the water

 

There are many more steps in the finishing process of 1:1 and I will share that if you are curious, but this should be good for a killer Kandie on a model 

 

You can get different shades and tones with Kandies with various techniques however, Kandies have what's called a ceil level, meaning that once you get to a certain level there will be no change in color. I have never seen or heard of a kandie going to a solid color in my 30+ years of applying this product.

 

I hope this helps!!!! jwrass


Edited by jwrass, 08 July 2014 - 07:27 PM.


#7 10thumbs

10thumbs

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 323 posts
  • Location:Florida Boy, living in Europe..
  • Full Name:Michael Dalton

Posted 02 July 2014 - 06:46 PM

Thanks JR,

 

I know that you wrote all of that in English.  But I don't comprehend. So, hold on, I'll take an English Course for Ongoing Spray Painters and I'll get back.

 

Let me read it a couple of more times.

 

Michael



#8 Ace-Garageguy

Ace-Garageguy

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,010 posts
  • Location:Down two, then left.
  • Full Name:Bill Engwer

Posted 03 July 2014 - 02:54 AM

jwrass has it down, so try to interpret what he's said...it's all sound procedural advice.

 

A couple of things to emphasize...as stated, candy top-coats are only tinted clear. It's EXTREMELY important to  watch your number of coats and overlaps of the spray pattern to insure you'll get even color. Any runs or buildup of candy on edges will be much darker than the surrounding area, so practice is a must to get good results.

 

Candy is about the most technically demanding paint job you can do, but don't let that stop you. Work carefully, and PRACTICE on a spare model body BEFORE you shoot the one you care about. You may have to strip your practice body and try it over a couple of times, but the value of practice and the experience you'll get can't be overstated.

 

You need a good smooth base to work over too. Any imperfections in your base will show through your tinted topcoat, so make an effort to get as perfect-as-possible uniformity of metallic flakes in your final base coat. (Again, as stated, bases are typically metallic silver or gold, though you can experiment with others to get unusual and interesting results).

 

Using a white primer for your final primer coat will make your color a little brighter than if you shot it over gray, or something darker.

 

Use good overall prep and primering techniques, and get your bodywork as perfect as you can. Candy tends to emphasize flaws.

 

Good luck, and remember, its fun to challenge yourself and develop new skills.



#9 blunc

blunc

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,112 posts
  • Location:phx, az
  • Full Name:mike cassidy

Posted 03 July 2014 - 04:36 AM

Here is something a little different you can try...

I have experimented in the past with different paint base/candy coats and found the following:

A coat (or two) of candy over the same/similar solid color yields an interesting variation of the commonly used solid color, I sprayed primer then insignia red followed by two coats of candy apple red.

The same build got primer, then metallic red followed by two coats of candy apple red. this was done on this 34 Ford:

red-34-1.jpg



#10 jwrass

jwrass

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  • Location:Waterford
  • Full Name:James W Rasmussen

Posted 03 July 2014 - 05:22 AM

Mike. That is a perfect example on working outside the box with base coats! As I stated in my post "any color can be used as a base. Awesome paint and build!!!!jwrass



#11 jwrass

jwrass

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  • Location:Waterford
  • Full Name:James W Rasmussen

Posted 03 July 2014 - 05:58 AM

Michael,

 

I tried to answer your question the best I could without getting to technical ( it's actually more technical than I described ) my bad, I apologize. I also failed to mention prep with primer and body work as Ace (Bill) pointed out. Body primer and prep are your foundation for a killer paint work, without a good foundation all he rest is for naught, again my bad. I guess I pee-ed before the water came. jwrass



#12 ZTony8

ZTony8

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:Eastpointe,Michigan
  • Full Name:Tony Buglione

Posted 03 July 2014 - 06:09 AM

Quick and dirty method(I use Tamiya paints):Spray a gold,silver,or copper base.Silver lightens the color,Copper deepens the color(see the Mazmanian Willys gasser).Then use transparent red over the base color in very light coats so as not to make the paint run(I found out the hard way)-the transparent paints are VERY thin.



#13 10thumbs

10thumbs

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 323 posts
  • Location:Florida Boy, living in Europe..
  • Full Name:Michael Dalton

Posted 03 July 2014 - 08:18 AM

Thanks guys.  JR and Bill-Ace GarageGuy, some very good information and I'm working on sorting the info out.  Terminology for instance, flash and the various coats, intercoat and all of these things is new to me.  When you two come up to bat, I'm looking closely!

 

Here's the scoop;  I've just recently, let's say in the last few weeks figured out how to use my AirBrush successfully.  Any paint I try, Acrylic from a Hobby and Crafts Shop (no model kits there, just Hobby and pro artists' stuff), Revell Acrylic paints, even my beloved Humbrol Enamels, I've learned to do them well.  I'm set to move on!  I can safely say I can handle my AirBrush, this doesn't mean I'm a good painter, but I'm progressing.  The biggest problem I have is dust, and hard small particles that love to land on my wet paint!  If three particles are in the room, two of the bastar...s land on my wet paint.  That's another problem.

 

I've in the meantime kind of figured that such cool paint jobs, and cool colors are more for the advanced model builder, or for an experienced real world paint pro.

 

I saw recently a model car that blew my mind.  It was so shiny and smooth I could see the new cavity on my tooth!   Plus the car had pinstripes on the hood and trunk as a novelty.  This is over my head.

 

But Tony's method above is sounding more and more like a hit. 

 

JR, do you have a candy paint job you can show us?  Or some cool pin striping?

 

Thanks,

Michael



#14 jwrass

jwrass

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  • Location:Waterford
  • Full Name:James W Rasmussen

Posted 03 July 2014 - 12:44 PM

Michael,

 

First lets address the dust problem, when you rub the surface of plastics, fiberglass, composites you create a static charge (through sanding rubbing it off etc) we have this problem on helmets, fiberglass and composite race car parts. the static acts like a magnet to pull all the trash in the air onto your nice paint work. Their are commercial products that will kill the static however this is a lettering, pinstriping recipe that has been around for as long as I have been pinstriping (stone age) It's 20% Isopropyl Alcohol (rubbing alcohol) and 80% distilled water mixed by volume. (put this mixture in a spray bottle) Right before you start to apply any paint to your model mist this solution onto the project and gently wipe it off with a micro fiber towel or paper towel will do. It will kill the static charge and you will have much cleaner paint work.

 

I know the nomenclature is different but it's pretty simple really, but I work with it on a daily basis. I have a ton of custom paint books, some good some bad, I'll go through them and give you a few recommendations. I don't have to dig to hard as I have them in the den/library/art studio/what ever she wants room!!! 

 

As  Ace said it is one of the most difficult paints to apply, but it can be done easily with practice. I know this is modeling and what I do is a whole different kettle of fish. but the basic mechanics are the same!!!

 

If you want to go down the Kandie land road I would suggest either the rattle can route or the airbrush route, pick one and learn that and then you can cross over! You have a airbrush, I would choose that route as you have much better control. That's a decision you can only make.

 

I say yes anyone can do it, it just takes practice and experimenting. My mixes and application may not work for you!  As yours may not work for me! Don't be afraid to give it a try it can't hurt you, It will frustrate you!!!! but it can't hurt you. It doesn't have to be for the advanced modeler. I saw your CMG car that thing is off the hook!!!! You have the skills!!!

 

I have been trying to post pictures for the last week. I have had several people send me how they do it (thank you all) but either I'm a complete moron or the system won't take my photos. maybe I'll get the seven year old from across the street to help me. I have sent some of my work to certain members on the site via email and that worked. If you drop me a pm I would be happy to share!

 

I need to get my butt in gear as I have much to do for a annual party I have on the forth.

 

I hope things are clear as MUD now.

 

Cheers, jimmy "Rass"


Edited by jwrass, 08 July 2014 - 07:34 PM.


#15 10thumbs

10thumbs

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 323 posts
  • Location:Florida Boy, living in Europe..
  • Full Name:Michael Dalton

Posted 03 July 2014 - 06:50 PM

Thanks JR, your words are encouraging!  I'm gonna give it a try. 

 

The static thing makes sense, although I'm surprised that plastic can act like this.  I'll wash it next time.  I have a boatload of plastic spoons that are a wonderful testing ground.  Even those small surfaces get dust!!  I can't wait to try your method.

 

I have lots of model kits coming my way, and I'm going to do hot rods and altereds, and those 33 Willys just kill me.  I have 2 already in boxes.With practice, some of them are getting candy paint on them.

 

Now, go and find yourself a kid who can fix your PC!  Don't pick him up though in your fuel altered, Mom/Dad  may want to ride instead.

 

Michael



#16 blunc

blunc

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,112 posts
  • Location:phx, az
  • Full Name:mike cassidy

Posted 03 July 2014 - 09:05 PM

Mike. That is a perfect example on working outside the box with base coats! As I stated in my post "any color can be used as a base. Awesome paint and build!!!!jwrass

Thanx James.

 

If you're not using photobucket, flickr or fotki to host your images (and if no one else has suggested it...) you should consider one of those options. After trying to upload a photo to this forum, I found it much easier to copy a link that photobucket thoughtfully lists in a menu next to photos I have uploaded and paste it into my posts here, a simple post preview shows me if it's working or not.



#17 jwrass

jwrass

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  • Location:Waterford
  • Full Name:James W Rasmussen

Posted 04 July 2014 - 05:06 AM

Michael, Did you get the photos I sent? You can perform this technique (Kandies) if you need any help just ask!

 

Mike, You are welcome! The paint is very impressive (so is the build) and a great example of not using the traditional norm of silver and gold as a base. A few years ago I painted a crotch rocket lime gold kandie over a silver white pearl base and it makes a stunning yellow.

 

Thanks for the picture issue advice, I have a photobucket account I'll give that a try.

 

thanks guys jwrass



#18 10thumbs

10thumbs

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 323 posts
  • Location:Florida Boy, living in Europe..
  • Full Name:Michael Dalton

Posted 04 July 2014 - 09:27 PM

JR, no pics.



#19 10thumbs

10thumbs

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 323 posts
  • Location:Florida Boy, living in Europe..
  • Full Name:Michael Dalton

Posted 05 July 2014 - 09:37 AM

I went downtown today and bought a can of Tamiya Clear Red.

 

Monday, after cleaning a plastic coffee cup the correct way, guess what I'm shooting?

 

Yep, Humbrol copper enamel on a plain white and smooth plastic coffee cup.

 

Another cup gets a real cool gold.

 

I even have a silver I can try out.

 

Then.....enter Tamiya Clear Red.

 

Jeez, if it doesn't work out half way decent, I'll go nuts for sure.  The Tamiya paint costed me $13 !!  But I had it quick, no delivery/package/customs charges.  No waiting either.  Just hope it lasts for a couple of trial jobs and a small car model.

 

Michael



#20 carrucha

carrucha

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 592 posts
  • Location:San Jose, CA
  • Full Name:Hector Sanchez

Posted 06 July 2014 - 08:34 AM

Thanks for the tips Jimmy.  Really helpful.