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Why are there so many iconic cars that have never been kitted ?


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#21 Greg Myers

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 05:31 AM

...well. I'm an _enthusiastic_ car modeller, and I don't recognise any of those "icons", nor do I have any interest in building them...

 

A decent state of the art kit of an E-Type would be top of MY list, followed by any number of more recent Jaguars and Astons and Maseratis and Alfas and Lotuses and Lancias...

 

bestest,

M.

 

OK ? In for one of these ? Lola%20GT%202.jpg 'cause we really need some more Jags, kinda like '57 Chevys. ;)


Edited by Greg Myers, 06 July 2014 - 05:45 AM.


#22 Greg Myers

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 05:36 AM

and if you can't wait for Revell . . . 27_track_roadster.jpg from Bandit Resin http://www.banditres...k_roadster.html

 

jimnb175.jpg http://www.hobbylinc...sory_1:25_nb175

 

hendrix-1927-ford.jpg http://www.rocketfin...uct.cfm?id=3640


Edited by Greg Myers, 06 July 2014 - 05:43 AM.


#23 1930fordpickup

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 05:45 AM

!929 Roadster with a track nose. Hard to beat that combo, Greg. 



#24 Matt Bacon

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 05:53 AM

 

OK ? In for one of these ? Lola%20GT%202.jpg 'cause we really need some more Jags, kinda like '57 Chevys. ;)

 

Yup... forgot to put Lolas in my list list. And if you know of a kit of any regular street Jaguar that's been designed in the last 30 years... just point me at it...

 

;-P

 

bestest,

M.



#25 Greg Myers

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 05:57 AM

 

 

Yup... forgot to put Lolas in my list list. And if you know of a kit of any regular street Jaguar that's been designed in the last 30 years... just point me at it...

 

 My bad, silly Yank. Jag = XKE  :huh: Sorry. Here's a present , if you can find one. LolaGT.jpg



#26 38 Crush

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 06:02 AM

Well guys I really don't know what to say about your not being able to obtain most of the original cars in this thread. I must be missing something because I have most of them except the Manta Ray. and the Cheetah. But the Cheetah is available in resin. Most of these are not kits but Diecast from The Danbury Mint. I have the California Kid, The Little Deuce Coupe and the McMullen Roadster plus several others. Butttttt....The Danbury Mint is almost gone now so it could be somewhat difficult to pick these up in the future. :(



#27 Harry P.

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 06:08 AM

The Danbury Mint is almost gone now so it could be somewhat difficult to pick these up in the future. :(

 

More than almost gone. They're gone, at least as far as producing diecast model cars. The only way to get them now is on the secondary market.



#28 blunc

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 06:11 AM

 

Aurora  img281.jpg

that's the one. :)



#29 Greg Myers

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 06:12 AM

Well guys I really don't know what to say about your not being able to obtain most of the original cars in this thread. I must be missing something because I have most of them except the Manta Ray. and the Cheetah. But the Cheetah is available in resin. Most of these are not kits but Diecast from The Danbury Mint. I have the California Kid, The Little Deuce Coupe and the McMullen Roadster plus several others. Butttttt....The Danbury Mint is almost gone now so it could be somewhat difficult to pick these up in the future. :(

 

So maybe it's NOT a licence problem ?  :o



#30 Greg Myers

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 06:17 AM

 

 

But perhaps the biggest fly in the ointment here is market interest:  Seriously, how many model car builders would jump at the chance to buy a kit of the Manta Ray today?  How much interest would there SERIOUSLY be in a plastic kit of a Bill Thomas Cheetah?  My guess is, such subjects only appealed to a portion of the marketplace back 40-50 years ago, and any model builder under the age of say, 45, more than likely wouldn't know either subject if it hit them in the face (figuratively speaking, of course).  Just consider the rather limited interest in the original 60's Ford GT's--it was 50 years ago last month that the first GT-40's sat on the starting grid at LeMans--now how many modelers today would wear a groove in the pavement getting to their hobby shop (or wherever they buy kits) were a new kit of those cars were to come out (or say, The Little Deuce Coupe, Kookie's Kar?)

 

moebius-1953-hudson-hornet.jpg017.149141813_std.JPG

 

One never knows.  ;)


Edited by Greg Myers, 06 July 2014 - 06:18 AM.


#31 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 06:17 AM

Everything based on old Fords can be built from readily available kits and parts, should the desire be strong enough.

 

The Cheetah resin kits can be built full detail with some scratch-bashing. A great opportunity to develop new skills.

 

The Manta Ray?   'Twas done as a slot car by 2 companies, so there's a start...   j260_2.jpg

 

MPCMantaRay1.jpg  

 

or for the really ambitious, how about scratchbuilding?  


Edited by Ace-Garageguy, 06 July 2014 - 06:25 AM.


#32 Harry P.

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 06:23 AM

The Hudsons had appeared many times on modeler's "most wanted" lists, so there was a known demand. The others you posted? Not exactly a loud cry from the masses to see them in kit form.



#33 High octane

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 06:33 AM

I hafta agree with Art's comments as the money to produce this kit or that kit is "just not there" at least not in today's market. Model companies are VERY careful in what they have tooled up and produced. Just take what's available and run with it.



#34 Bob Ellis

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 06:49 AM

In the '60s, AMT was heavily subsidized by the auto companies through the promo business. When that dried up, the flow of new models slowed down. Today, you have to pick a winner.



#35 Art Anderson

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 08:24 AM

In the '60s, AMT was heavily subsidized by the auto companies through the promo business. When that dried up, the flow of new models slowed down. Today, you have to pick a winner.

I wonder if the term "subsidized" isn't a bit of an overused misnomer though?  By the 1960's, AMT Corporation's 3in1 Customizing and Trophy Series kit sales FAR surpassed their promotional model business--even when factoring in the sales of what began as promo's as flywheel motor equipped toy cars that were merchandised through hobby shops (alongside their kits), toy stores and variety stores.

 

Consider also that there were other companies producing 1/25 scale promotional model cars aimed at the auto industry and new car dealerships:  Cruver Plastics Company in Chicago, Product Miniatures from Milwaukee, Ideal Models (soon renamed JoHan), SMP in the Detroit area,  and the "Johnny come lately" Model Products Corporation.  While all of those outfits produced promotional model cars at some point in the 1950's onward, the only promo I can think of that was "subsidized" at the tooling level was SMP 1911 Prototype Chevrolet, which tooling was paid for by Chevrolet, and destroyed by the terms of their contract with SMP once the specified run of assembled promo's along with a supply of kits had been produced.

 

What did happen though, was a tremendous amount of cooperation between the automakers and the various model companies then engaged in the development, manufacture and sale of promotional model cars for distribution to car dealerships.  Consider the advantage of being privvy to what next year's new cars were going to look like, a year or so in advance, not to mention the tremendous trust that had to be established between automaker and plastic model manufacturer, to keep those new styling features confidential until new model introduction time!  That cooperation alone had to have meant a great deal in terms of costs not incurred at say, AMT.  But in any event, it was the model companies who (with the exception of the above-mentioned '11 Chevy) stood the cost of development of the tooling, against pretty much guarranteed sales numbers.

 

Another interesting thing is, AMT wasn't in the "driver's" where promotional models were concerned, prior to 1958-59--that position probably had to have been Product Miniatures (PMC), who had a much bigger deal for several years with Ford (producing not only Fairlane Hardtops, but also sedans, station wagons, even the first 1/25 scale Ranchero's), in addition to being pretty much the first (and only -- until 1958) supplier of promotional models to Chevrolet, then firmly ensconced as "USA-1".  Again, as with their Ford promotionals, PMC did multiple body styles, and was the first producer of 1/25 scale Corvettes, beginning in 1954-55.  Additionally, PMC produced their promo's for Ford and Chevrolet in a wide variety of paint schemes, playing into the need of dealers to be able to show quickly the range of colors and body styles in the days before mega-new car dealerships.  In addition to their promotional model car business, PMC had a long-standing relationship with International Harvester, doing promo's of IH pickups and farm equipment in plastic, and a similar gig with Allis-Chalmers, the then prominent Wisconsin farm tractor and implement maker.

 

JoHan, of course, was the smaller of the three, having to be content with doing promo's for Chrysler, Nash/AMC.  Hubley was still even smaller, manufacturing only a handful of subjects.

 

Of course, the big change came in 1958, when AMT's management bit on the idea of offering their promo models in styrene  kits, with the added customizing and racing accessories we young boys went for in a HUGE way when those first 3in1 kits hit store shelves in the late spring.  AMT had dabbled with kits before, offering promo's and flywheel toy car spinoffs as knocked down kits, but those had only limited success--they were more "build your own toy car" than anything like a model car kit, and weren't particularly popular.

 

But, the bottom line is still, from everything I have ever read or heard said to me, that there really wasn't any direct subsidizing of promotional model car tooling--those seem to have been an entrepreneurial game from beginning to end.

 

Art



#36 Art Anderson

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 08:38 AM

actually the Little Deuce Coupe was sold as a model kit even though the name "Little Deuce Coupe" or "Silver Sapphire" was not used on the box. The box art clearly shows a model of the Deuce made famous by being on the cover of a Beach Boys album.

 

Any guesses?

 

I have been trying to get one off evil-bay for a while but the bids keep going into the "stupid" range.

Aurora, in 1/32 scale?



#37 Art Anderson

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 08:44 AM

 

moebius-1953-hudson-hornet.jpg017.149141813_std.JPG

 

One never knows.  ;)

 

 

Greg, Mainly because it's taken almost 60 years for large numbers of now middle-aged and older model car builders to grasp the appeal of those Hudsons (and to an equal extent, the '55-'56 Chrysler 300's)?  Seriously though, were it not for the tremendous racing heritage of both of those subjects, I wonder if they'd ever have had the interest they do now.

 

Back when we 50-70yr olds were teenagers, you might have gotten some of us to buy a C300 or 300B kit, but a Hudson Hornet--I don't think so.

 

Art



#38 Brett Barrow

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 09:00 AM

I'd green light a kit of the McMullen Roadster in a heartbeat. Even easier today given the remastering and new tooling Revell did to make the Stacey David car.

And the Project X 210 is only a hop skip and a jump away from the Bel Air post sedan.

But hey, nobody wants to see more 32 Fords and 57 Chevys, amirite?!?! :-)

Edited by Brett Barrow, 06 July 2014 - 09:02 AM.


#39 unclescott58

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 09:17 AM

I'm surprised AMT or MPC did not do the Manta Ray back in the 1960's. They did most every other popular show car at the time, but the Manta Ray. I can understand Art Anderson's arguments of why they might not want to tool up a kit of it today. But, where was it when it was appearing in things like Beach Blanket Bingo?

There is some question by several people posting here that people under 45 would not be interested in a lot of the cars suggested by others here. I'm not so sure of that. A lot of cars that we found cool as kid, the younger crowd does too. Go to real or model car shows, see what interests them. I'm always amazed see people much younger than I excited over cars they could have not seen back in the day. Cool is still cool, no matter how old you are. I'm way too young for the late 40's and early 50's Hot Rods and drag cars. Hudson was gone just before I was born. I didn't grow up with Model Ts or As running around. Or classic Duesenburgs, Packards, and Cords. But, guess what? Just as earlier generations thought they were cool, so did I. Cool is cool no matter it's age. Heck there are things from antiquity that I think are cool.

Scott

#40 Luc Janssens

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 09:55 AM

A S&H Gran Torino looks do-able if one designs it together with '72 and maybe add a wagon with a drag race option....but the big question is, is the weekend modeler realy waiting for these?

 

http://ideas.revell....deas/item/2592/

 

slide_1.jpg

 

http://ideas.revell....deas/item/2893/

 

slide_1.jpg

 

 

Wslide_2.jpg

 

But for arguments sake what could be shared tooling or design wise?

 

Drive train?

Chassis and floorplate with engine bay?

Buklkhead (Firewall)

Gastank?

Windshield?