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Best selling cars (and truck) of all time


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#21 1930fordpickup

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 04:23 AM

The Model T still on the list with a short run compared to the rest of these. Impressive.



#22 Harry P.

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 04:24 AM

I was kind of expecting the Mustang to be on that list.



#23 CJ1971

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 03:31 PM

I was kind of expecting the Mustang to be on that list.


Funnily enough so did I Harry. It would have to make a Top 20 list, surely?

#24 Rob Hall

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 03:36 PM

I was kind of expecting the Mustang to be on that list.

Not really, it's been around a long time, but it's always been a low volume model compared to world cars like the Corolla...



#25 Harry P.

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:08 PM

Mustang sales 1964-2013: 4,319,500. Not even close enough to make the list.



#26 Rob Hall

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:21 PM

Mustang sales 1964-2013: 4,319,500. Not even close enough to make the list.

Yeah, to put sales #s in perspective, the Focus and Corolla sell over 1 million units annually worldwide.


Edited by Rob Hall, 08 July 2014 - 04:21 PM.


#27 Harry P.

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:24 PM

When you think about how relatively few cars there were in the 1910s-20s compared to today (and fewer people), it makes it all the more amazing that they sold over 16 million Model Ts.



#28 Rob Hall

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:26 PM

When you think about how relatively few cars there were in the 1910s-20s compared to today, it makes it all the more amazing that they sold over 16 million Model Ts.

And what's amazing also is there were far more car companies in the '10s-20s that today...countless small independent companies that often had short lives..



#29 Harry P.

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:29 PM

Right... there were dozens and dozens of car makers back then. Yet Ford had like a 90% market share. Well maybe not that high.... but they had the market cornered for sure.



#30 Rob Hall

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:31 PM

Right... there were dozens and dozens of car makers back then. Yet Ford had like a 90% market share. Well maybe not that high.... but they had the market cornered for sure.

Yes...and in the mid 60s GM had a majority market share, one year or two they built over a million full size Chevys..'64 and '65 I believe... fascinating to look at the numbers over time.


Edited by Rob Hall, 08 July 2014 - 04:32 PM.


#31 Harry P.

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:34 PM

A few tidbits I found...

 

 

1923

 

The Ford Model T accounted for just under 52% of cars produced in the U.S. There were 13 million cars on American roads. There were 108 firms manufacturing automobiles, but just 10 firms accounted for 90% of annual production.

 

1924

For the second year in a row, Ford production of Model T's approached the 2 million mark. The price dropped to $290. Over half the cars in the world were Ford Model T's.



#32 Mark

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:34 PM

I'll call BS on the Corolla. There have been periods (in North America, at least) where Toyota has sold "Corollas" on multiple platforms at the same time. Cars do evolve, but not with two or three completely different (front drive and rear drive) cars marketed with the same name at the same time. It would be like Chevrolet selling the Impala, and selling the Camaro alongside it as the "Chevrolet Impala Camaro"...

#33 Bennyg

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:36 PM

VW golfs are great. Would definitely get one of those (gti version of course) if I were looking for another car. What a great list. My grand father still has a model t. Needs to be restored though. Still runs.

Ben

#34 Rob Hall

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:39 PM

I'll call BS on the Corolla. There have been periods (in North America, at least) where Toyota has sold "Corollas" on multiple platforms at the same time. Cars do evolve, but not with two or three completely different (front drive and rear drive) cars marketed with the same name at the same time. It would be like Chevrolet selling the Impala, and selling the Camaro alongside it as the "Chevrolet Impala Camaro"...

Those were variations of the Corolla..in the mid '80s there were 2drs, 4drs, 5drs, etc.  Some were RWD, some were FWD.  All were part of the Corolla family. In some markets they may have had different model names. 



#35 Harry P.

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:46 PM

I'll call BS on the Corolla. There have been periods (in North America, at least) where Toyota has sold "Corollas" on multiple platforms at the same time. Cars do evolve, but not with two or three completely different (front drive and rear drive) cars marketed with the same name at the same time. It would be like Chevrolet selling the Impala, and selling the Camaro alongside it as the "Chevrolet Impala Camaro"...

 

Then I call BS on Impala, which has been a RWD and FWD car over the years. Completely different platforms, same model name.

 

How do you determine at what point a given model stops being that model and becomes another?



#36 Joe Handley

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 05:55 PM

What would make that different from the Lebaron or New Yorker of the same time period? The Lebaron name was on both front or rear wheel drive platform over a 15 year period with those cars being coupe, convertable, sedan, hatch sedan on cars that didn't really share that many of the body lines from one body style next. Same with the New Yorker, had it on compact, fwd, 4dr sedan as well as a "full sized", rwd sedan at the same time.

#37 johnbuzzed

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 02:40 AM

Back in the early '80s, the Olds Cutlass Supreme was one of, if not the best selling cars in that period.  There seemed to be a gazillion of those boxy, cranberry-colored cars all over the place.  I'm a bit surprised that it didn't make the list.



#38 Modelmartin

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 03:32 AM

I second the motion that these are the best selling nameplates of all time. The Model T was essentially the same car. Bodywork changed, wheels changed but mechanically they were essentially the same. You can swap mechanical parts throughout the years. The Beetle was essentially the same. They are the best selling cars of all time. Corollas? Try putting a 2014 Corolla engine into a 1970! They are different cars with the same nameplate. So are all the others on the list.

 

Mini sold over 5 1/2 million from 1959 to 2000. That does not include the new Mini/BMW. They also have a very high degree of interchange of parts over the years. Definitely the engines and gearboxs can be changed over the years. Beats the Mustang by over a million!

 

I drive a 2001 Passat wagon with 170,000 miles on it. It has been perfectly reliable. Do the maintenance and reap the benefits. They need synthetic oil and premium gas (1.8T). VW had problems with sludged up turbo motors because people were running dino oil and not changing it often enough.



#39 Modelmartin

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 03:40 AM

 

How do you determine at what point a given model stops being that model and becomes another?

 

I would think when nothing interchanges anymore.

 

I would say when the platform is changed it is a different car. One Example: A Chevelle is the same car from 64 through 77 despite wheelbase and body changes. They downsized it in 78.



#40 Harry P.

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 07:22 AM

 

I would think when nothing interchanges anymore.

 

I would say when the platform is changed it is a different car. One Example: A Chevelle is the same car from 64 through 77 despite wheelbase and body changes. They downsized it in 78.

 

I would agree. Which makes lists like this a little iffy... some of the cars on this list have nothing in common over the years but the model name. Too many changes over the years to be considered the "same" car. This list is definitely a list of best-selling nameplates of all time... not necessarily best-selling cars of all time.