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Best selling cars (and truck) of all time


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#61 Brett Barrow

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 05:50 AM

VW brochure from 1970, earliest one I've found that uses "Beetle", though a few earlier made mention of "bug" or "Bug".

 

http://www.thesamba....cdnfullline.php

 

page2.jpg

 

By 71 with the introduction of the Super Beetle it was pretty much in all English VW literature. But I'm sure in Germany they were always officially "Type 1" or whatever...  

 

http://www.thesamba....hatyearisit.php

 

2_3.jpg


Edited by Brett Barrow, 10 July 2014 - 06:00 AM.


#62 johnbuzzed

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 06:06 AM

 

I would think when nothing interchanges anymore.

 

I would say when the platform is changed it is a different car. One Example: A Chevelle is the same car from 64 through 77 despite wheelbase and body changes. They downsized it in 78.

Consider the different Charger variations or "generations" through the years.



#63 Skip

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 10:58 AM

I am quite surprised that the Mini is not on that list. With a production run from 1959 to 2000, badged under several different BMC nameplates like Austin, Morris, Rover and variants Riley, Woolseley... Nearly every British driver during that run either had one, or drove at least one. Imported through-ought the United Kingdom, U.S. (Until 1967), Japan. All four Beetles, Enzo Ferrari, Peter Sellers, Twiggy, Steve McQueen, Clint Eastwood, Paul Newman, James Garner, Jackie Stewart, Britt Ekland all owned Mini's. Not to mention the bazillion other non-famous owners. Have to wonder also if the 5 - 6 million production numbers were for the domestically produced Mini's excluding those produced in Australia and a few other foreign market countries.

I can see the Model T on that list, Ford's high volume assembly and long production run saw to that, same with the VW Beetle. The Passat?

#64 1930fordpickup

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 03:06 AM

As long as they do not sell a front drive and a rear drive in the same year they still count. As long as the auto evolves into something new acrossed the board with the name let the numbers roll.  If it is the same car in every market  you can count the total sales numbers as the same running total, but if you are selling last years cars in a different country I think not. 



#65 Art Anderson

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:28 AM

All of this thread is interesting, of course, but let's take a look at some numbers that really tell the tale, as to which car was truly the best selling car of all time.  Some things to ponder here:  

 

1)  The number of cars on the road.

 

2)   Yearly automobile production.

 

3)   Percentage of annual sales achieved by the best-selling car in a given year.

 

1) By 1910, there were 458,500 automobiles on the road in the US, far more than in any other single country on the planet.

 

2)  Ford Motor Company sold 32,053 Model T's that year. By  1912, and the opening of their Highland Park MI plant, Ford had a production capacity of 26,000 cars a month, or in excess of 300,000 cars a year, and by year's end, fully 75% of all cars on the road in the US were Fords.  In 1914, Ford sold 308,313 Model T's, all produced in Highland Park. (GM very nearly went bankrupt in 1912, Ford announced the industry's first rebate --$50 to each buyer of a new '14 Model T if the company sold at least 300,000 cars that year, and Ford sent out a $50 check to each new 1914 T buyer, my grandfather got one of those checks).  In 1915, the US automobile production to over 800,000.  The number of cars in the US reached 2,000,000.  In 1915, Willys-Overland was the 2nd largest US automobile company, producing 91,780 cars.  In 1916, US automobile production passed the 1 million mark and Ford sold 734,811 Model T's.  (by 1917, the total number of cars on US roads was 4.8 million, the rest of the World combined had just 720,000 cars.

 

3)  In 1921, Ford held what was to be the largest share of the US market of any automaker since--some 61% of all cars built in the US were Model T's  (GM had just 12%, and once more, was nearly driven into bankruptcy).  By 1924, the production of the Model T was just shy of 2,000,000 cars, and held the highest market share of any car, all over the World, with more than 50% of all cars everywhere being Fords.

 

I would submit, that while other specific models of cars have surpassed the production figures above, as the worldwide production and sales of cars grew since 1924, no single model of automobile has ever achieved anything like the percentage of total production (in the mass production era which still goes forward) nor the market penetration and market share achieved by the Model T Ford.  And all of this happened in a time when there were vastly more companies/makes of automobiles than at any time since.

 

Art

 

 



#66 Harry P.

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:35 AM

The most amazing stat is that at one time, more than half of all cars on earth were Fords!

 

Now that's dominating the market!  :D



#67 Danno

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:38 AM

That's dominating ALL the markets!

 

 

Yeah, I'd say the Model T deserves the all-time title.  Art makes a compelling argument.



#68 Harry P.

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:42 AM

Did you know that Ford continued to manufacture Model T engines until 1941?



#69 Harry P.

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:49 AM

Model T American market share:

 

http://web.bryant.ed...arketshare.html



#70 Art Anderson

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:51 AM

Did you know that Ford continued to manufacture Model T engines until 1941?

Yes--Ford produced Model T engines all the way out to our entry in WW-II, in part due to Henry Ford's insistence that replacement parts be readily available for the Model T (and subsequent cars as well), apparently in his mind, in perpetuity  (Ford of Canada continued to offer the 21-stud 85hp flathead V8 through the late 1980's as well!).

 

Another major reason for such longevity of production was the use of Model T, Model A and flathead V8's for industrial purposes (saw mills, feed mills, even small narrow-gauge railroad locomotives--primarily in logging) for years, even decades after the cars they were designed for had ceased production.

 

Ford wasn't alone in this, either.  As late as 1960 (possibly later), Chevrolet was still cataloging parts for virtually every era of Chevrolet engine ever built, all the way back to the early 'teens, now a good century ago.

 

Art



#71 sjordan2

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 06:23 AM

 

 

Ford wasn't alone in this, either.  As late as 1960 (possibly later), Chevrolet was still cataloging parts for virtually every era of Chevrolet engine ever built, all the way back to the early 'teens, now a good century ago.

 

Art

 

However, as of six years ago, Chevy no longer had the parts to replace the nose and hatch on my '93 Corvette. Plus, the dealer put me in a Catch-22 -- they could only use Genuine GM Parts and not salvage parts, but there were no GM Parts. I eventually tracked down the parts on my own.



#72 Brett Barrow

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 06:24 AM

Another major reason for such longevity of production was the use of Model T, Model A and flathead V8's for industrial purposes (saw mills, feed mills, even small narrow-gauge railroad locomotives--primarily in logging) for years, even decades after the cars they were designed for had ceased production.

 

 

Art

 

My grandad used to have a flathead Ford V-8 powered portable welder, but I believe it was built contemporary to the flattie's production.  



#73 Harry P.

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 06:27 AM

 

However, as of six years ago, Chevy no longer had the parts to replace the nose and hatch on my '93 Corvette. Plus, the dealer put me in a Catch-22 -- they could only use Genuine GM Parts and not salvage parts, but there were no GM Parts. I eventually tracked down the parts on my own.

 

Hey, at least it hasn't been recalled. Yet.   :lol:



#74 Art Anderson

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 08:39 AM

 

My grandad used to have a flathead Ford V-8 powered portable welder, but I believe it was built contemporary to the flattie's production.  

I was very intrigued by the aircompressor I saw at the Towe Ford Museum in Sacramento in 1998--it was a Ford flathead V8, with every other cylinder converted (through the use of ingeniously designed cylinder heads) to compressing air!  One head had spark plugs in it's front and rear cylinders, the opposite head using sparkplugs in the two middle cylinders.

 

While it would have run quite well, with a regular, evenly paced firing order and exhaust note, it had to have been one vibrating SOB!

 

Art



#75 Mark

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 11:39 AM

 

However, as of six years ago, Chevy no longer had the parts to replace the nose and hatch on my '93 Corvette. Plus, the dealer put me in a Catch-22 -- they could only use Genuine GM Parts and not salvage parts, but there were no GM Parts. I eventually tracked down the parts on my own.

I remember a few years ago, a lady I knew owned a '99 Impala and GM couldn't supply a hanger for the exhaust system.  I'm not sure if an aftermarket part was available.  This was a while ago, the car was about five or six years old at the time.

The manufacturers only have to supply body and trim parts for a certain length of time.  My niece's '03 Cavalier was hit hard in the front when it was two or three years old.  Even at that time, the choice was between a used front fascia or an aftermarket piece that didn't look exactly like the OEM piece.  GM couldn't/wouldn't supply a new one.  And the used one was hard to find, because most salvage yards wouldn't break up a complete front end to sell the bumper.  If I remember right, they did locate a used one.

If the dealer will use only GM parts, that sounds like a self-imposed rule to me.  As far as I'm concerned, if they want the job they can supply the parts to do the job. 

Insurance companies are another matter.  Someone nailed the rear bumper on my '04 Dakota when it was about two years old.  Insurance company can specify used parts (in NY) if the vehicle is not the current model year, and/or has more than a few thousand miles on it.  Unfortunately for them, they couldn't find a used one in good condition, so they had to spring for a new one in my case.



#76 Tom Geiger

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 03:44 PM

The most amazing stat is that at one time, more than half of all cars on earth were Fords!

 

Now that's dominating the market!  :D

 

Couldn't happen today. The government would've broken it up as a monopoly!   :D

 

The volume they managed to build is amazing considering that there was no computer automation at all.  Just making sure the cars got shipped to the right places was a major paper effort!



#77 Harry P.

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 03:50 PM

And even more amazing is that people were able to find their destination without GPS, and survived the drive without AC, cupholders, or backup cameras!  :lol:



#78 sjordan2

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 04:19 PM

And even more amazing is that people were able to find their destination without GPS, and survived the drive without AC, cupholders, or backup cameras!  :lol:

 

Of course, when the Model T came out, it was amazing to think that average people could afford such an amazing piece of technology.



#79 unclescott58

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:56 PM

At first I wasn't that surprised by this list. But the more I think about, somethings do not make sense. Were are the full-size GM pickup trucks on list? Up though the 1970's Chevrolet CK series trucks out sold the Ford F-series most years. When Ford did take over sales leadership, the Chevy were always still close in sales. In some cases if add Chevrolet and GMC together the GM truck outsold the Ford. This also brings up the Toyota Hi-Lux pickups. Not sold here under that name in many years. But, a very big sell still in other parts of the world. And I don't know, is the smaller Toyota pickup truck sold in the US really a Hi-Lux under a different name?

Scott

#80 Art Anderson

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 08:07 PM

 

Of course, when the Model T came out, it was amazing to think that average people could afford such an amazing piece of technology.

Well, consider that in 1908, when Model T was introduced, they sold for nearly $900.  What took place was first, the constant re-engineering of production processes, cutting the number of individual pieces of many components, and then simply "economies of scale", wrought mainly by the introduction of the first truly constant moving assembly line conveyor systems, along with various other means of achieving the mass production numbers that Ford did evenually achieve.  As a result, by 1925, a bare-bones, stripped down Model T roadster sold for just $290.00 FOB Dearborn, and that after serious inflation brought about by the rather short but fever pitch of wartime production in 1916-early 1919.

 

Art