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building a spray booth in a dusty environment. need some serious advice


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#41 Pete J.

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 06:20 AM

One piece of advise.  MOVE!  Man that looks like photos my grandparents took in the 40's of the dust bowl days.  That must be heck on everything especially the real deal cars.  You probably don't have to worry so much about rust with a free daily sandblasting.



#42 Quick GMC

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 06:33 AM

I can't move. I work for my dad's business which has been anchored down here for almost 35 years. I'm pretty much here forever. There is a large desert on the other side of those buildings, which goes for miles and miles, all the down and past my house, near the windmills.

 

 

 

So my wife told my parents I was looking at a spray booths, i was showing her the one I wanted. before I could explain I was going to build my own, they ordered it for me for my birthday. I got it last night, a week early. So here I am with the Artograph spray booth. It may be an overpriced exhaust fan, but this thing is built WELL. I am working with James to figure out how to make it even better. We have a good plane to make it fully enclosed.

 

I was going to build an enclosed box from a cabinet, but I think I can do the same with this booth. I don't have the heart to return it, and I really like it, so I'll make it work.



#43 10thumbs

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 09:00 AM

That's some serious dust.

 

All other dusty places are just wimpy.

 

Maybe spraying models is not that important.  I'd be worried about breathing in a place like that.

 

Michael



#44 Quick GMC

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 12:24 PM

I work in a granite shop. The dust outside pales in comparison

#45 JohnU

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 01:06 PM

That's some serious dust.

All other dusty places are just wimpy.

Maybe spraying models is not that important. I'd be worried about breathing in a place like that.

Michael


Dito man!
I think you got bigger problems in that environment than just painting little model cars!

#46 tbill

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 04:07 PM

wow, ya, you got some dust!

 

i'm thinking paint whatever you are going to paint, set it outside, and let mother natures sand paper smooth it out [sand storms].

 

 

again, you were not kidding when you said dust!



#47 Quick GMC

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 04:19 PM

It's nearly impossible to keep out of our AC system. It's not a breathing hazard or really that bad, but when trying to lay down a nice paint job, it does have an affect.

 

One thing I was thinking is putting a filter over the vent for the air coming into the room, that would limit the dust flying around.

 

the other problem with my other booths was I had to open the window to place the vent board outside. Well dust would get into the room between the little crevices. I'll be cutting a hole in the wall to have a permanent vent outside with a door on the other side to make it a one way vent. These two should help tremendously.



#48 10thumbs

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 06:36 PM

Cameron, you mentioned above working in a granite shop.  So, I suppose theres some cutting and polishing going on, and I'm sure the abrasive materials are water cooled, as well as having the fine dust reduced.  So, using this type of water system to reduce dust would be the way to go, or not?  When i see the environment you live and work in, I can't readily imagine that filteringalone is going to produce the best results.  Some kind of thicker plastic sheet in conjunction with water running down the sides would perhaps be a good thing.  No?  Air and filters, ain't gonna get it.  Water.

 

Don't paint shops work with water running down the walls?  I know Mercedes Benz in Stuttgart does, that would be good enough for me.

 

Michael



#49 Quick GMC

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 07:38 AM

Cameron, you mentioned above working in a granite shop.  So, I suppose theres some cutting and polishing going on, and I'm sure the abrasive materials are water cooled, as well as having the fine dust reduced.  So, using this type of water system to reduce dust would be the way to go, or not?  When i see the environment you live and work in, I can't readily imagine that filteringalone is going to produce the best results.  Some kind of thicker plastic sheet in conjunction with water running down the sides would perhaps be a good thing.  No?  Air and filters, ain't gonna get it.  Water.

 

Don't paint shops work with water running down the walls?  I know Mercedes Benz in Stuttgart does, that would be good enough for me.

 

Michael

 

 

If it were a full size booth I would consider that, but we're talking about a bench top booth in the bedroom of my house.

 

As of right now, this is the plan I am working on

 

1. Artograph spray booth

2. 5 sided box made of acrylic to go over the Artograph spray booth and completely seal it up.

3. Cut holes in the acrylic box to stick my arms through, possible add the built in gloves

4. Permanent hard ducting from the booth to the wall, through the wall with a one way flap. This will be about 24" of tubing, very short.

5. Filter incoming air

 

 

I have successfully painted 1 (ONE) single body in 6 years in this house. I believe it was because I used a very fast drying lacquer. I have completed two other bodies with paint, but literally two days of sanding and polishing each to get them to that point and there was still rub-through. I have laid down one perfect enamel paint job from my airbrush, only to have it ruined with dust and hair.

 

I have spent all the money I am willing to spend. I bought fancy new compressor and airbrush, I buy the best paints, I practice, etc. I have gotten better over the years, I know it, but I am always questioning myself. I have never addressed my work environment properly. Either this works or I'm done. Which would be very devastating to me at this point, but it frustrates me more to put all the detail into these cars that I do and not be able to finish them or put them on a shelf.