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Don Wheeler

Member Since 29 Sep 2009
Offline Last Active Today, 09:58 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Airbrushes

25 October 2014 - 05:05 AM

I don't know about the older Badgers, but the current models are just as solvent resistant as the Iwatas.  The only seal that isn't is in the air valve.  I clean my Badgers with lacquer thinner all the time.  There's no question Iwatas are fine airbrushes.  I just prefer the 155 for painting models, and it runs a little over $60.

 

Don


In Topic: Airbrushes

24 October 2014 - 05:30 PM

I'll add my 2 cents.  There are a lot of good airbrushes.  My favorite for all around use is the Badger 155.  Some people don't like it.  What feels good to me may irritate you.  And, different airbrushes do have different feels.  Some put out a whisper of paint, and others can blast out a lot.  The 155 and similar acting 175 seem like a good compromise to me.  The HP-C mentioned is a beautiful airbrush.  But, with its .3mm nozzle and gravity cup, it wouldn't be my choice for model cars.  The small nozzle means you might have to thin more.  And, I like the ability to attach a bottle and know I have plenty of paint for the job.  But, obviously some modelers prefer it.  You don't really need a fancy airbrush.  The proof of that is the fine work you see by people using the simple 350 or Paasche H.  A lot depends on learning to use the one you have.  But, if you lust after something like a Harder & Steenbeck CR plus Infinity 2 in 1 with gold plating, go for it.  It will certainly do the job.

 

Don


In Topic: Airbrush and Air Compressor

31 August 2014 - 02:09 PM

"That wont work on my gravity feed. It leaks paint past the needle seat if I do."

 

I'm not sure what you mean by needle seat, Paul.  If you mean the front end of the airbrush, yes, it can leak if you pull the needle back too far. Like I wrote, it's touchy.  If you mean the internal needle seal, the seal is leaking and needs to be adjusted or replaced.  But, this would be a problem even in normal use.

 

At any rate, it's probably better to develop trigger control rather than to depend on tricks like this.  And, that just takes some practice.

 

Don


In Topic: Airbrush and Air Compressor

31 August 2014 - 08:46 AM

"The thing I like about the 175 is that its dual action, but can also be set up to act like a single action.  Just pull the pin back slightly and it acts line a single action.  I actually learned to use it that way,  on the suggestion of someone here on the board. "

 

You can do this with just about any airbrush.  Just pull the needle back a little before you tighten the needle chuck.  But, it's a touchy setting.  Some airbrushes, like the Paasche VL and the Badger 100SF have an adjustment screw to make it easier.

 

The 175 is a good airbrush.  It's pretty much a 155 with a fat body.  And, it has an optional 1.0mm nozzle that can put out a lot of paint.

 

Don


In Topic: Airbrush and Air Compressor

30 August 2014 - 12:18 PM

I almost agree with Harry 100%.  But, I'm a nit picker by nature.

 

"But I will say that you should get the best airbrush you can afford right up front,"  What's best for the purpose?  it doesn't necessarily correspond to cost.  An Iwata micron is a fine airbrush, but poorly suited for painting model cars.  And it's very delicate and parts are expensive.  But, I do agree it's best to start with something from a main line manufacturer that will stand behind its products.  I know there are people who are happy with their Chinese no-names.  But, I've seen plenty who have had problems with them too.

 

"A cheap single action airbrush (single action being the type where you can't really adjust the ratio of air to paint."  Not quite correct.  A good single action has good control of mixture.  But, it is a threaded adjustment, and can't easily be done on the fly.

 

"You pull back on the trigger to spray air and you push down to release the paint."  Sorry, Harry.  You got this one backwards.

 

And finally, I don't know whether Harry is inferring this, but I don't consider the 155 a starter airbrush.  I have some really nice airbrushes, but the 155 is the one I actually use most.  As he says about good airbrushes, with reasonable care it will last a lifetime.

 

Don