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Jim N

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  • Scale I Build
    1/24 or 1/25

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  • Location
    Kansas
  • Full Name
    Jim Newman

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MCM Ohana (6/6)

  1. The “good ol days” of racing are old, and they are not very good. I have read about the supposed halcyon days of F1 when you could look at a group picture of the drivers before the start of the season and KNOW that 1 or 2 of them would die before the season concluded. I remember reading about drivers being crowned as champions posthumously. Those are not good ol days. I could not understand Jackie Stewart’s almost fanatical demand for safety, until I read about the time he raced, and then I understood his point of view fully. Dale Earnhardt, Sr. is not with us today because the good ol days were far too dangerous. Some of it was Earnhardt’s lack of understanding of safety. A driver seat that was not suited for racing and his insistence on wearing an open faced helmet, but car design, more specifically, front chassis design had changed to the point where the front ends were so stiff that a driver could not ride out the collision. The race cars looked like a 60’s crash test where the car crumples to the front wheels and then bounces back. I remember the 2000 season where a truck series driver, Adam Petty and Kenny Irwin, Jr. lost their lives. I remember members of Congress telling NASCAR after Earnhardt Sr’s death to get their act together and fix their safety problems, or Congress would gladly fix the problems for them. Reading about or seeing race car drivers in caskets far before their full number of years have elapsed is not a cause for celebration in my book and is why I will never view the good ol days as being anything but old days. Today's racing is very real, and thank God, not as openly dangerous as the good ol days.
  2. There are a couple of other considerations. Starting any hobby is hard. There are a lot of skills that have to be mastered and at each level frustration can set in that makes the person give up the hobby. There is a reason we see a lot of lightly used sporting goods at garage or yard sales. Model building is no exception. It can take 5 to perhaps 10 models before the person sees real improvement. There is the monetary cost, but there is also the fact that frustration may set in and the person does not want to stay with the hobby. The other point that I think is important is that the time a lot of kids have is highly regulated. They go to school and then are whisked away to an activity after school. Then they go home to eat supper and then either have to do their homework or they may be whisked away to another activity. My kids are in their 20's and we did this to a certain extent, but I hear some parents talk about how they run their kids around, and the kids don't have the time to start many other activities. The Playstation or the Xbox are easy diversions. The games cost about $60.00. They could have hundreds of fails learning the game, but the cost is still $60.00. Bluenote made a brilliant point about the sheer number of other options there are available to kids, but they are also available to adults. Times are vastly different now and there is so much more that can draw a person's interest.
  3. On Sunday went to the airshow in Kansas City and saw BOTH the Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds. The Thunderbirds were supposed to be in Michigan and their show must have been cancelled. They were added to Kansas City at the last minute. That airshow was spectacular!
  4. Impressive looking model Michelle. Great work!
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