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fyreline

Members
  • Content count

    13
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About fyreline

  • Rank
    MCM Member

Previous Fields

  • Scale I Build
    1/25

Profile Information

  • Location
    Syracuse, NY
  • Full Name
    David Reeves
  1. Isn't it time....

    Yes, I figured someone would chime in, eager to point out the other differences - which is why my original post said that "very little" would need to be included to do either year . . . Not that "nothing else" would be needed. I have owned both 1966 and1967 GTOs and I am well aware of the many differences. The point of the post is still valid, though. Many kits would lend themselves to being built as multiple years and/or versions with a minimum of additional parts and tooling costs.
  2. Isn't it time....

    That could easily work - as a very simple "for instance", offering a kit to build either a 1966 or 1967 GTO would involve very little beyond two grilles, an interchangeable tail panel, and two engine choices.
  3. Isn't it time....

    Crazy thinking-out-loud suggestion: We would all be foolish not to acknowledge that the bottom line for any scale model producer, regardless of nation of operation, is, well . . . The bottom line. It's all about the money, as is usually the case regardless of topic. Bearing that in mind, what about a return to multi-piece bodies allowing for easier production of multiple body styles, but utilizing 21st-century production techniques for better fit? This would allow more rapid amortization of tooling costs, increase potential for more sales at reduced investment cost, provide more versions of a given platform to increase appeal, and keep overall costs down (which the manufacturers would rather read as "keep potential profitability up.") I have been building model cars since the late 1950s, and I well remember the terrible multi-piece body kits of that era. I have no wish to return to that frustration, but I'm willing to bet we could do better today. What say you?
  4. Still waiting for the '73 Laguna, and everything I have seen and read tells me it will be well worth the wait. Just keep me in mind when the time comes.
  5. I can only imagine - the reviews are great, I'm sure you're swamped. More important to get things RIGHT than to get them RIGHT NOW. Good things take time. I'll wait.
  6. Any progress on the '73 Laguna? Been a while since I checked in.
  7. Hopefully work on the 1973 Laguna version is still progressing? Been a while since anything was posted.
  8. My brother's best friend had a rich Dad, who bought the kid a brand-new 1970 AAR 'Cuda, in the blue color that for some reason you rarely see. Quite a car for anyone, let alone a high school kid. It DID most definitely have the hood bulge. I always wrote it off to poor fit of a fiberglass hood on a steel body, as the few others that I saw when they were brand new all had the bulging hoods as well.
  9. The finished 1973 Chevelle kit looks excellent. Stll holding out for the companion 1973 Laguna . . . I know you have a lot on your plate, I'll wait. It'll be worth it.
  10. What do you drive?

    Here's my current ride . . . 2007 C6 Corvette convertible. Bought it new, as a present to myself. I've tweaked it a bit under the hood but it still looks stock. More fun surprising people that way.
  11. Great job - it catches the look and character of the car perfectly. I'm still looking forward to a 1973 Laguna version.
  12. Hanging in there for a '73 Laguna. What I see so far convinces me it will be worth the wait . . . . great job!
  13. OK, I'm another one who has read through this entire topic with great anticipation. My first new car was a 1973 Laguna . . . and I would certainly buy a few of these when they are available. Can't wait to see the finished product. Incidentally, mine had the bench seat so having that option would be nice . . . but not critical. Please keep us posted as to how and when to order, and THANK YOU to you and everyone who has contributed to make this model a reality. Outstanding work.