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About Alfa158

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  • Scale I Build 1/25 to 1/20

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  • Location Southern California
  • Full Name Mario Liegghio

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  1. Alfa158 added a post in a topic Stainless Steel versus Chrome Trim   

    Good advice. The only older cars I have detailed experience with are my old '57 Fairlane and '68 Dart so I remember from afternoons of washing and polishing that the 60's Dodge had a lot more SS than the 50's Ford .
    I think what I might do is use Ace's info on how the material used may be driven by the techniques needed to make that shape. In cases where I can't get the research material I will probably assume thick, rigid, complex shapes such as headlight and taillight bezels and bumpers are chrome and items like window and side trim are most likely SS.
    Thanks everybody!
  2. Alfa158 added a topic in Model Building Questions and Answers   

    Stainless Steel versus Chrome Trim
    OK this is kind of a nit-picking issue but I tend to suffer from AMS (Advanced Modelers Syndrome; I still shake my head over the time I fabricated homemade wire wheels for a $5 swap-meet SMER Alfa-Romeo kit).
    I know that the large shiny trim parts on cars, such as bumpers are usually hard chromed pieces but some of the smaller trim such as drip rails and window frames are actually polished stainless steel. I know how to simulate either one; for chrome I use Bare Metal Foil and for stainless steel I use a Pilot extra fine point silver marker (SC-S-EF).The Pilot makes it easy to apply paint to narrow surfaces and it dries hard to a finish that gives you that shine of stainless steel that is just short of the sort of hard deep shine you get with chrome.
    The question I have is what are the guidelines for which to use where? I can't always rely on having access to a 1:1 that I can inspect, and I can't tell from reference photos which goes where on which cars. I have a vague idea that the SS trim did not become common until around the 60's and I think it was usually used on pieces that are thin and have to flex such as window trim.
    Any suggestions on guidelines?
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