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smellyfatdude

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About smellyfatdude

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  • Scale I Build
    1/25

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  • Location
    Toon Town
  • Full Name
    D.W. Graves

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  1. Like the ones on the box, that's what I'm after. I believe the stock wheels in the ' 74 truck kits were the same. If interested, I can offer in trade the unused stock wheels from the AMT ' 68 Galaxie. Or perhaps you need the custom hood from the AMT ' 67 Galaxie. I have quite a few leftover parts from some other old annuals, as well.
  2. Whatever this kit’s flaws, there’s absolutely nothing lacking in your skills. There’s some nice detail in these Trumpeter Falcons, and you captured every bit of it. Then add the perfect color choice, for the win. 😉
  3. I love Pontiacs, I love those old AMT annuals from that era, and above all I love that color combo! The detail was there in those kits, you just have to bring it to life. I'd say, mission accomplished . . . and then some! 😎
  4. I used to have much the same issue, and yes some paints are indeed more prone to chipping. Especially on builds that didn't get clear coated. So, this became my method. After pushing the foil down with my finger, I take a q-tip moistened slightly between my lips, and push the foil down some more with that first. Then I use the wide end of two flat toothpicks, a blunt one and a fine one. The blunt one on the left is one I picked out of the box 'cause it has a nicely rounded end and was just the right thickness. The fine one on the right has been trimmed with an xacto, to give the one corner a bit of an angle. Viewed from the side, you can see the difference in thickness. I use the blunt one lightly along the edges of what's being foiled. Then I run the fine one over the edge, and give it a good push down. Not hard enough to crack the toothpick, but because it's wood and not metal, it has a slight "give" to it. Going slowly and patiently along that edge, several times, believe it or not it will actually cut most of the foil, and a light pass with the blade does the rest. I use two xacto knives, one for cutting the foil from the sheet and the other strictly for trimming. As noted, a light pass with just slightly more pressure than the weight of the knife should do it. When I trim the foil away, if I notice a few places where I cut slightly wide by a hair or two I simply run the fine toothpick over the edge again, slowly and that usually trims the stragglers away.
  5. Speaking strictly for myself, that is without question the nicest looking truck build I have ever seen! 😎
  6. I worked as a molder in a foundry, for many years. In metalcasting, those are known as risers. As already noted, they are there to ensure that as the plastic cools, the part in the mold cavity doesn’t shrink. That little bit of plastic pushes against the part until it solidifies.
  7. That's a $20,000 paint job, in 1/25 scale. Simply gorgeous!
  8. Better than a picture, which is why I love replicating a car from someone’s past. That’s a gorgeous Impala, and the interior is stunning. My ‘ 62 Impala four door was that exact color. Looks like you could get in it and drive away. 👍
  9. I once bought an AMT ' 57 Chevy Pro Shop kit from fleabay, the one with the yellow car on the box still sealed for $0.99. Definitely worth the $12 or so for shipping.
  10. Great build, jr! Always like your tri-fives and it's nice to see you post it here. You should take some fresh pics of this ' 56 you built, from that kit I sent you. Still hard to believe you took that flash covered piece of junk and made this out of it.
  11. Nice save, and the two cars look great together!
  12. Looks good. Now, you just need to build the shuttle to go with it!
  13. "By Design, for ' 79". That was Chrysler's advertising slogan that year, here in Canada. And yes indeed, your build captures the look of those cars perfectly!
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