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Richard Bartrop

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About Richard Bartrop

  • Rank
    MCM Ohana

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  • Are You Human?
    Yes
  • Scale I Build
    1/24-25, mostly

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  • Website URL
    http://bartrop.purrsia.com

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  • Location
    Calgary
  • Full Name
    Richard Bartrop

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  1. I remember their Porsche 928 kit didn't have any chrome, but the real car didn't have any, so it wasn't a big deal.
  2. Apparently to restore whatever cosmic imbalance that was created by car based pickups, Ford of Brazil created truck based sedans. It might be worth modelling one just to see the fuss over which section it goes in.
  3. I can barely put one colour on a model, so I have the highest respect for anyone who tackles a Watson style paint job.
  4. Animated French short about the 1955 Le Mans race.
  5. They're probably better known in model airplane circles, and they never sold their kits in US under the Frog name. They are noteworthy for basically inventing the plastic model kit. I had the AMT version of the Gullwing way back when it was released as part of their "Special interest" line. It's a nicely detailed kit with a fairly accurate shape. It is a '60s vintage kit, so some finessing will be required, though not as much as on the MPC classics. Lots of chassis detail that will never see the light of day once everything is buttoned up.
  6. Very nice. I'd say you nailed the look.
  7. According to Kustomrama, it was but over a three year period, and appeared on the Jan 1964 issue of Rod & Custom, so early '60s. It also shared an AMBR win with the Invader in 1968.
  8. I'm going to start off by saying that you should build whatever makes you happy, and don't worry about the opinions of some faceless mob on the internet. It would be sad if people thought they had to run a focus group every time they start a project. That said, there are two things that bug me. The first is setups that obviously won't work in real life. Show cars get a pass because they were seldom designed to be functional in the first place, but something like a blown hemi driving stock Model T wheels? Yeah, that won't be pretty. The other is when someone says they're making something from a certain era, and it's a mishmash of styles from five decades that I know is like nothing that was actually built then. You want to mashup different styles, that's great, but if you're trying to replicate a particular style, know what it is you're replicating.
  9. Richard Bartrop

    Modern Cars

    There are plenty of exciting cars being built today. The Charger and Challenger are just two of them. All those plain vanilla car kits back in the day had more to do with the marketing strategies of the Big 3 than the demands of the kit market. That the kit market is geared towards people who are mad that it's not the 20th century anymore probably doesn't help either.
  10. Same here. I'd love to see them do this one, in any scale.
  11. Oh, Exner loved his retro. Here's the Imperial for '61 : And of course he was responsible for the Revivals not long after he left Chrysler.
  12. "Here we have a look that combines the style of the Continental spare with modern practicality. Jet age styling that still evokes the classic cars of a more elegant time." Retro styling is nothing new, and just like now, your results may vary.
  13. I don't think it's a T-Bird because there's too much sheet metal surrounding that tail light. If you look closer, what looks like a fin at first is actually part of the background, and whatever that spot on the bumper is, it defintiely doesn't match the shape of the T-Bird exhaust. It's definitely some variation on an early Falcom. Looking at the taillight bezel, I think the closest match for US Falcon models might be a '61 model.
  14. That bezel looks a little thick for a Falcon, so I'm going to toss out that it might be a 1960 Frotenac?
  15. Oh, that was exactly the point. The annual model change was a key component of what Alfred P. Sloan termed "Planned obsolescence." That it drove out of business any competitor who couldn't keep up probably didn't hurt either.
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