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Rotorbolt73

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About Rotorbolt73

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  • Scale I Build
    1/24 1/25

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  • Location
    tenessee
  • Full Name
    Matt McCain

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  1. Exactly. Thus exposing the achillies heel of everything in this current information age of digital computerized everything: Electrical power via the grid or batteries. All connected together wirelessly stored in a invisible virtual world that you physically cannot sense or even access without a computer. Everything in our world rests on that and that alone. Can be gone instantly quite easily..And that is VERY concerning.. At least with a physical book or magazine , I can still read and find information when the power is out. I keep a library of old car mags and technical manuals.. just for that reason. The knowledge and information in them is much better and more in depth than what is left printed today. Most young people today would not know what a Hollander interchange manual is.. Used to be mathematical equations were common in car magazines like hot rod..to calculate cubic inch displacements and cfm rates for instance ..geometry, physics, thermodynamics, mechanical engineering , electricty, hydraulics, even metrological things like atmospheric pressure and humidity etc...I learned a LOT as a kid on how to build , work on, modify and even paint a car from mags alone ..mags today explain none of that stuff anymore.
  2. 20th century world / culture we knew and grew up in is dying off. The good magazine writers are gone just about. Subject matter is less interesting. Too many advertisements. Prices too high. Younger people and kids do not read physical books, magazines anymore.. Etc. My favorite was car craft for years because it was more geared towards us regular broke guys on a budget. Hot rod got to where it catered towards subject matter and expensive stuff I can't afford..I got tired of seeing silver / bare metal cars with overhyped LS engines and stupid huge rims or blacked out cars with huge turbos and overkill NOS systems.. Or articles that were basically advertisements and instructions for products advertised elsewhere in the mags. Just not interesting or practical anymore. Last article series I got excited about, a few years ago, was a early 90s S10 V8 build in car craft by Jeff Smith using a swapmeet / junkyard 80s TPI system. Real world hot rodding that can be done by the real world average gear head on a budget.. I was hoping to duplicate that to use in my Nova one day. Only reason I resubscribed at the time. Sadly, the feature build slipped and skipped a few issues and I lost interest again..letting my subscription expire. Never knew if they ever got the truck done . Ohh well.
  3. I have this 66 Chevelle wagon roof and rear quarter section .
  4. Looking for the cardboard drive in diner display that came in the monogram "highway scenes " 37 Ford kit.
  5. Yeah. Having worked in the auto restoration field professionally , I've seen cars come in where things were replaced needlessly , sometimes well over 3/4 of the car would be new reproduction aftermarket parts...personally, I try to keep as many of the actual original parts as possible..flaws and all. Many cars are over restored..looking better than they were originally new. It's a misconception these things were perfect off the line..they were not originally show cars..but production cars. Next time you're at a car show and looking at those beauties, think and ask yourself: how much of what I'm looking at is original vintage stuff that physically existed back in that time is was made? How much of that car was recently manufactured and put together? It's possible now to build a new 55-57 Chevy and not one bit of the car even existed in the 50s. Same goes for a 32 Ford. So the " Lee 1" charger is actually gone. What's left is just some pieces of it on another car. What they should have done is kept it and preserving it as is. Maybe using other original general Lee pieces scavenged and saved from other chargers from the show used to fill in the blanks..like the missing door on it..keeping it as original tv car . By the way, you did an excellent job on your build here..especially that teal paint color..I've got a glue bomb general Lee that I've been considering re building in this version..just not wrecked up..
  6. Nice colors too. The stock flat hood is a unique touch.
  7. Man that turned out great looking . I've got several of these. Some from Ollie's too.. I can't see what you guys go on about them being a terrible kit..I see nothing wrong..it turns out great with some work..you showed it could be built . Just takes a thing called skill to do it. Which you have..I recently built the 72 GTO with no problem showing it too can be built. these kits are the same as they were when I was a kid 30-40 years ago. I've built the more recent revell 69 Nova..it was ok..but lacking in a challenge to my skills..given the choice, I would still buy the AMT kit here. Which I'm grateful that it is still available all these decades later. So you did a superb job on building this. It's a testimony to your building skills. excellent.
  8. Built this one a year or so ago for a club contest..got what was left of a cut up Lindberg 53 Ford victoria body shell from a friend . Pieced it back together and used a hood from a AMT 56 Ford and custom pieces from the AMT 49/50 Ford kits. Found a Revell 89 Thunderbird SC parts kit at our club show in Memphis . Kit bashed the two together based on an old early 90s SAE magazine feature of a light blue AMT 49 Ford using the same Thunderbird kit. The 53 is similar dimensions as a 49 and I knew it work just the same to build a updated version of a 53 Ford. I used the complete chassis, engine bay, wheels and interior from the Thunderbird kit . The fit require very little mods to work the two together..the t bird donor kit was missing some of the V6 engine parts..notably the factory supercharger setup..so I substituted it with a parts box Ford FI V8 from a mustang kit I think. I used the T- brid optional wheels with monogram tires with handpainted whitewalls. Color is Testors firey orange and duplicolor silver.
  9. This is the wooden ship kit I have..my uncle got a nice start on the hull. Looks likes it's all there but I don't know anything about these kind of kits..not my thing. So if interested, let me know.
  10. I have a wooden ship kit collecting dust. My uncle started on it but has since passed away..somehow I ended up with it. I don't build ships so I'll never do anything with it. I'll dig it out and get a pic later.
  11. Excellent work..I've considered this project as well , but wanted to do it as less damaged as it was before it was " wrecked" ..but can't figure out that wierd color. Looks like teal blue/green? They restored that real car ..which I thought was a mistake since so much had been replaced that little of the actual original car that to made that iconic jump is left. Shoulda left it as it was in it's "petty stock car" configuration .
  12. Thank you. That is neat. I had thought about scratch building my own. But that is a much more attractive alternative . It would cost that much just in evergreen material to build it.
  13. Man ,I dig the car crusher. You scratch build that? I've thought of doing the same..buy a bunch of old prebuilts and weather and wreck em up..much easier than using new kits since most of the paint and assembly is already done.
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