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galaxyg

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    1/24 Cars

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    mfhughes.com

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    United Kingdom
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    Michael H

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  1. Thanks. It's a big A2 sheet of black paper, made by a company called "Canson", from the local art shop.
  2. Background: The 180SX is one of my top 20 Japanese sports cars, and Fujimi's kit of the Type-X version is the best/only option currently in production. Fortunatly it's a good one. Purple seems to suit a lot of Nissan sports cars, and there are (as yet) no other purple cars on my shelf. Pros: The body is incredibly cleanly moulded, with no seam lines, no flash or anything to clean up. The rest of the kit is reasonably simple but plenty good enough, and it all fits together perfectly. The moulded-in Type-X bodykit makes the car look better than the base model (Tamiya's out-of-production kit is the base model). Choice of LHD and RHD dashboards. Cons: No engine. The suspension is a little simplified. There are inexplicably two windscreens in the kit, one on the main sprue which is a little foggy, the other crystal clear. Perhaps an engineering/moulding problem with the former? The boxed wheels are not especially great and the tyres on them are not as low-profile as the box art would have you believe. Verdict: In this case I think the photos speak for the kit as a whole. It looks like a 180SX, builds easily and can give a great result without wrangling the kit. I've not built Tamiya's kit but I think this Fujimi one is comparable in the quality of the end result. Build notes: Built over 3 weeks in April/May 2022. Extras to the kit are: Aoshima Wedssport SA70 wheels, texture on the parcel shelf, an intercooler and mounting, and a Nissan emblem on the front of the bonnet. The car is painted in Hycote rattle-can Rover Amaranth purple, clearcoated with Mr Hobby Premium gloss.
  3. Looks good, nice colour choice.
  4. The recreated setup is below. The only difference is the original pictures did not have that patch of light across the car, as it was a less sunny day. The inset shows a photo from this exact recreated setup. The light patch makes it not as good but still nice. The main elements are: 1) A piece of black paper propped up against a box of cat food* to make an infinity curve. 2) A small light just to bring a little more light onto the front of the car (turned off in the setup image below but normally running at only about 20% anyhow). 3) A 35mm lens. When a 35mm lens is used about 300mm (12 inches) from a 1/24 car, it's a good approximation of the type of perspective when an eye sees a 1:1 car. 4) An aperture setting on the camera narrow enough to put the entire car into focus, front to back. Real cars when photographed are all in focus. And that's it! *other pet food boxes also work
  5. Thanks. When I get a mo I'll take a photo of the setup, it's deceptively simple. They're taken indoors but in a conservatory, so there's a lot of light. There just one piece of black paper as the backdrop.
  6. Great looking build of an uncommon livery.
  7. Background: I do like the Toyota Crown very much as a large saloon car, and this 14th generation of the Crown is my favourite from them all. The hard part was finding a colour which suited it. This is the 3rd Aoshima Toyota Crown I've built. Pros: Nice clean mouldings, good shape and proportions, good decals, plenty of details - for example a separate chromed crown emblem for the steering wheel centre. Window masks included. Fits together easily. Moulded in white so it's easy to make it any colour you wish. Great wheels. Adjustable ride height and camber, if that's your thing. Separate chromed door handles. Cons: The glue contact points for the front and rear bumpers are very very small, and needed reinforcement from the inside. The chassis is Aoshima's long-in-use spring/screw adjustable "large car standard" and is not representative of the real thing. The front grille's chrome part's attachment to the sprue could have been in a place less visible in the final build. Curbside - no engine. Verdict: Very very good. It easily builds into an excellent replica of the real thing. Build notes: Painted in Hycote Audi Dakota Grey, cleared with Mr Hobby Premium Gloss. The only addition to what was in the box is the Toyota emblem on the boot, which is a Tamiya item. The door mirrors are by some margin the largest I've ever fitted to a kit. At this point I'm certain I've found the sweet spot of model car kit photography, a few of these are amongst the best I've taken.
  8. Background: The French do make some very nice rally hatchbacks and I like the look of this WRC car a lot with its silver/red Total livery. Shame the road version of the 206 is so horrible. I bought this particular version of the kit as it included a driver and co-driver - slightly less faffing with seatbelts and buckles. I chose to make this as Marcus Gronholm's car, despite him not winning with this event or the championship that year. The car at least has a 1 on the door. Pros: Lots of quality mouldings, perfect fitments and detail as you'd expect from Tamiya. Decals were very easy to apply. Cons: It may be user error but I found the rear wing didn't locate very well, and the top part of the rollcage didn't sit well either. The painting instructions for the driver/co-driver helmets are incorrect if you choose Gronholm/Rautiainen. The steering wheel needed a little drilling before it'd fit over the shaft of the steering column. Verdict: Very very good. It builds into an excellent replica of the real thing. Build notes: I've added a P/E bonnet and boot catches, some seatbelts and a few other details around the interior. Mostly it's built out-of-the-box as what's in the box is so good. Body is Tamiya TS-17 Gloss Aluminium and parts of the sills are sprayed red rather than decalled. The only red decal down there are the ones on each door. Clearcoated with Mr Hobby Premium Gloss. Built over the course of two months from Feb-April 2022.
  9. Great build of a great looking car.
  10. Ooops. I posted this in the WIP thread earlier today when I meant here... Background: I'd always planned to build one of Tamiya's early kits, a boxy JDM car with actual wing-mounted mirrors. The 1970's looking Leopard TR-X Turbo was long my preference from the 8 or so I could have tried to find from the Tamiya catalogue. Pros: Very easy to assemble and very well moulded. Some conveniences right in the box as the front and rear lights are seperate and chromed, not moulded-in body colour buckets. Proportions look good and even a kit as old as this shows Tamiya's dedication to quality. "TURBO" decals are supplied both in white and in black, giving you body colour choices later on. There's a bonus Honda Tact scooter in the kit also, and a Driver figure. Cons: No engine. No brakes (not that you could see them anyway). No Japanese number plate decals, just dress plates. Wheels are unrealistically bright chrome. Interior floor is the reverse of the underbody floor pan and looks like it too. Some of the underbody parts like the exhaust are all moulded in. Some sink-marks to deal with. Verdict: With a low part-count It's not as detailed as a modern kit but it does build into a very good replica of a Nissan Leopard. Build notes: Built over 3 weeks in February 2022. The only extra details added are rear seatbelts, all-round seatbelt retainers and JDM number plates. Painted in Tamiya Titanium Gold (upper) and Ford Ginger Ale Metallic (lower), with an AS-22 Dark Earth interior. Cleared with Mr Hobby Gloss Premium. I didn't build the Honda Tact that comes with it yet. Looks like a lot of fiddly maskng with the way it's assembled.
  11. Background: I'd always planned to build one of Tamiya's early kits, a boxy JDM car with actual wing-mounted mirrors. The 1970's looking Leopard TR-X Turbo was long my preference from the 8 or so I could have tried to find from the Tamiya catalogue. Pros: Very easy to assemble and very well moulded. Some conveniences right in the box as the front and rear lights are seperate and chromed, not moulded-in body colour buckets. Proportions look good and even a kit as old as this shows Tamiya's dedication to quality. "TURBO" decals are supplied both in white and in black, giving you body colour choices later on. There's a bonus Honda Tact scooter in the kit also, and a Driver figure. Cons: No engine. No brakes (not that you could see them anyway). No Japanese number plate decals, just dress plates. Wheels are unrealistically bright chrome. Interior floor is the reverse of the underbody floor pan and looks like it too. Some of the underbody parts like the exhaust are all moulded in. Some sink-marks to deal with. Verdict: With a low part-count It's not as detailed as a modern kit but it does build into a very good replica of a Nissan Leopard. Build notes: Built over 3 weeks in February 2022. The only extra details added are rear seatbelts, all-round seatbelt retainers and JDM number plates. Painted in Tamiya Titanium Gold (upper) and Ford Ginger Ale Metallic (lower), with an AS-22 Dark Earth interior. Cleared with Mr Hobby Gloss Premium. I didn't build the Honda Tact that comes with it yet. Looks like a lot of fiddly maskng with the way it's assembled.
  12. There certainly is! Look out for the completed photos either late Saturday or sometime Sunday.
  13. Headlights and tail lights, the car gets it's face. These wheels are *very* chromy. A trick I've used before. Mr Hobby Flat Matt. Turns chrome into aluminium in one coat. The wheel centres are intended to be black with giant hex decals to cover the chrome (decals can be seen at far left of photo). But this seems not the best way. Mr Muscle soon gets the chrome off. and I'll trim out the badge part of the decal to use on semi-gloss black instead. What can't be seen on this image is the new *black* TURBO decals down the side. Turns out Black was the best colour after all, so happy accident. As is often the case with my builds, the mirrors are the final part to go on. In this instance Tamiya has even moulded in the small mirror wipers of the original car. How useful these are in real life, who knows but it's amazing the amount of great and/or weird engineering that used to go on with Japanese cars and also - how much of that cool stuff they kept in their domestic market only. This is the last photo in the WIP, completed photos will follow as soon as.
  14. What follows are a series of photos going from freshly clearcoated (top) to the first look at combined body/chassis. Via a lot of polishing and masking for the black parts and annoyingly - and on one side only, the TURBO decal I thought should be protected by clearcoat, pulled off by the mask. Shame BUT - the kit does come with a second set of these decals in black and for a while anyway I've been wondering if that would have been the better colour choice anyway. Now I'll find out.
  15. I've not seen the studio27 ones but the Haswgawa green is what I'd describe as "quite dark" and the real car photos look about the same to me.
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