Bernard Kron

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About Bernard Kron

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    MCM Ohana

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  • Scale I Build 1/25th

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  • Location Seattle, WA
  • Full Name Bernard Kron

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Bernard Kron's Activity

  1. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic '32 Ford High-Bolster Roadster - 8-23 Update   

    Thank you, Tom.
    The technique I use is pretty straightforward. If there's a "secret" it is only about what kind of paint I use and what to do with it as you apply it. I use Testors Acryl acrylic paint. Other acrylic paints will work but the important thing is to make sure it's not too thin and watery. Makes sure it's thoroughly mixed. You want plenty of pigment in it and you want it to thicken as it dries. It should dry fairly quickly, too.
    What I do is apply the paint with a moderately broad brush, covering the area I'm working on completely with a medium thickness coat - enough so it covers thoroughly with no low spots but not so thick as to slow the drying time. Now what you want to do is purposely introduce brush strokes into it - exactly the opposite of what you'd do to brush-paint the exterior of a car body. As the paint dries continue brushing it, first cross hatching vertically and horizontally, then at 45 degree angles. Use light surface strokes, just enough to leave brush marks but not enough to dig down into the paint. If you do this for a minute or two the paint will take on an irregular "leathery" texture, but still remain relatively smooth. The longer you do this the rougher the texture you'll create. This is the key. Then, after the paint dries, apply a light, thin dark contrasting wash to emphasize the texture, wiping away virtually all the residue immediately after you apply it. Do this two or three times depending on the effect you want to create. Along with the texture you established in the previous step, the amount of contrast and darkness of the color wash you apply will determine the amount of distress or "dirt" in the :leather". The final touch,  if you want a slightly shiny "leatherette" look, is to apply a light coating of skin oil, such as that found along the side of you nose, with your fingertip. For a more dull look omit this step.
    You can use any color acrylic that you want, The color above is Testors Acryl Leather.  Below are a few additional examples. The important part is controlling the texture and the amount of contrasting wash.
    Testors Acryl British Crimson to simulate distressed Oxblood Leatherette(lots of texture and black wash):

    Testors Acryl Tan for the darker surfaces and Duplicolor Wimbledon White for the lighter ones. No wash was applied and only the tan surfaces were given the "leather" treatment.

    Testors Acryl Guards Red  with dark red wash:

    Testors Acryl British Crimson, heavily textured with red and black washes and light sand and rust weathering powders:

  2. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic '32 Ford High-Bolster Roadster - 8-23 Update   

    Thanx Kerry!
    It’s a roller! The front suspension is assembled, almost entirely from a Revellogram ‘29/’30 Ford Pickup/Sedan kit. I split the wishbones, stripped the kit chrome and substituted Krylon Chrome paint for a duller, more period look. I really wanted to include the posable steering feature but the layout of the ’32 Ford frame interfered with the tie rod, rendered the whole setup impossibly fragile, and forced me to glue the whole thing solid. Bummer… The wheels & tires are now glued in place so the stance is set. It’s got a subtle rubber rake and sits fairly high despite the dropped front axle – very much like early postwar rods did. And I think those narrow Herb Deeks rear truck tires are just about perfect for this era hot rod. So here’s the chassis with the body mocked up into position. The motor is from a Revell ’40 Ford with the early-style dual intake from an AMT ’34 Ford 5-Window Coupe kit (special thanks to Vince and Paul for helping me out on getting hold of this period –critical part). The fuel log is scratch built but the dual lines aren’t hooked up yet, nor are the air cleaners installed. Now for fettling the hood, grill, and then cleanup and touchup on the body work, lighting, windshield (the stock height windshield is just mocked into place), and final assembly. Next week for completion?
    Thanx for lookin’,
    B.

  3. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic '32 Ford High-Bolster Roadster - 8-23 Update   

    Thanks Misha!
    I’m very near to the final assembly stage. The chassis and rear suspension are done, the front suspension fabricated and painted and ready, the motor about half way there (parts painted, block, heads and ignition assembled including wiring), the interior completed and installed in the body. This leaves intake and carbs to do on the motor, the grill, windshield and lights, and putting it all together. The color and the upholstery are definitely already giving it that 40’s vibe. Can’t wait to see how the stance works out and what the Kelsey Hayes wire wheels do to the look…
    Here’s a composite showing the Revell ’40 Ford rear suspension, the interior and the finely detailed stock style firewall courtesy of Replicas & Miniatures Co. of Maryland. The rear suspension arms were shortened and relocated to account for the narrowed track and shorter driveshaft. The steering wheel is a Monogram ’37 Ford truck item and the instrument panel is the Revell kit item, cut out, thinned and foiled.
    Thanx for lookin’,
    B.

  4. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic Wanted: 1/25th scale Vintage Flathead Dual Carb Intake Manifold   

    Hi David,
    The carbs would be cool too, but its the early style dual carb manifold (with the two carbs next to each other towards the middle). But it turns out that I have some coming. So I think I'll be OK.
  5. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic '32 Ford High-Bolster Roadster - 8-23 Update   

    The Columbia was introduced in 1932 on the Auburn Speedster and was a vacuum operated unit. Here's Hemming's summary of the unit:( see http://www.hemmings.com/magazine/hmn/2006/06/Columbia-two-speed-rears/1280603.html )
    "The Columbia two-speed offered a low gear ratio for low-speed pulling power and fast acceleration from a dead stop. It could then be shifted into a higher ratio on the fly to give the vehicle a smoother and more efficient ride for highway speeds. The higher ratio also allowed the engine to run at a lower rpm once the car was moving fast enough to utilize the second speed or ratio. The two gear ratios were achieved by engaging and disengaging planetaries within the rear end housing by means of a vacuum-controlled canister that was mounted to the differential. The shift mechanism for the overdrive unit was a control valve that was attached by a special clip to the unit's bellcrank to the clutch pedal. The control valve was connected to a plate below the carburetor, which supplied engine vacuum on the intake side and sent this vacuum to the "motor" on the rear axle on the exhaust side. The vacuum canister or motor was connected to the control valve by copper tubing and a rubber vacuum line that ran the length of the driver's side of the undercarriage. A cable-operated activation switch was installed on the dash to engage the two-speed unit."
    Here's a company that rebuilds them and sells repair parts, etc. for them today: http://www.columbiatwospeedparts.com/Pages/default.aspx
  6. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic Wanted: 1/25th scale Vintage Flathead Dual Carb Intake Manifold   

    Yep. None finer, and some very hip offerings at that. I was just hoping for something less than Norm's 6+ week turnaround. But you're right, I should place an order with Mr. Veber before too long. Running out of flatty dual carb manifolds should tell me something! LOL...
  7. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic Wanted: 1/25th scale Vintage Flathead Dual Carb Intake Manifold   

    Thanks for the hedz up, Chris. I didn't notice the difference (it's just below this section but I stopped here - duh...). I'll post it there.
  8. Bernard Kron added a topic in Wanted!   

    Wanted: 1/25th scale Vintage Flathead Dual Carb Intake Manifold
    Ideally the one from the AMT '34 Ford 5-window kit (non-street rod version - on the chrome tree), but the somewhat later dual carb manifold from the Revell '40 Ford Street Rod Coupe or '48 Ford Custom Coupe kits will work, too. Will buy, sell, or trade. I have tri-carb manifolds but have used up my last twin-carb setups.
    Thanx,
    B.
    • 6 replies
    • 121 views
  9. Bernard Kron added a topic in Trading Post   

    Wanted: 1/25th scale Vintage Flathead Dual Carb Intake Manifold
    Ideally the one from the AMT '34 Ford 5-window kit (non-street rod version - on the chrome tree), but the somewhat later dual carb manifold from the Revell '40 Ford Street Rod Coupe or '48 Ford Custom Coupe kits will work, too. Will buy, sell, or trade. I have tri-carb manifolds but have used up my last twin-carb setups.
     
    Thanx,
    B.
    • 2 replies
    • 138 views
  10. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic ferrari 250 california   

    Welcome to the forum.
    A beautiful model. The 30 years experience is evident in every detail. And what a delight to see classic "kit bashing" applied to this subject - with such a stunning result. Bravo!
  11. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic '32 Ford High-Bolster Roadster - 8-23 Update   

    Just a quick update. I’m making good progress and have gotten some basic housekeeping out of the way. I determined the color of the car and shot a test shot to make sure it looked like I wanted. The body and chassis will be Tamiya TS-11 Maroon over red oxide primer. Here’s a quick test shot with just one coat of color and one coat of clear, but it’s a close match to Ford Mandarin Maroon and what I thought would be appropriate for a 40’s era hot rod.

    Here’s the interior, finished in Testors Acryl Leather over red oxide wth flat black carpeting. The basic leather texture is in place but there’s still some buffing down and weathering left to do.

    And finally, I did the final chassis prep before primer and color coat. I separated the Revell kit shocks from the brackets/headlight mounts, stripped the brackets of their chrome, and glued them in place before paint. This is something I always promise myself I will do but manage to overlook and land up having to paint the brackets by hand after the fact. This time I finally did it right. I also made small brackets for the split radius rods I’ll be using at the front. The main chassis will, of course, be body color, but I masked out the floor pan so it will remain bare plastic. It will be painted Testors Metalizer Gun Metal once the chassis is fully painted and cured hard enough to mask.

    The Flathead V8 block is painted and the motor ready ready for final assembly and detailing. Meanwhile I’ll start primer and paint on the chassis and main body parts.
    Thanx for lookin’,
    B.
  12. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic '32 Ford High-Bolster Roadster - 8-23 Update   

    Thanks guys!
    The bolster was part of the upholstery, an integral part of the seat back, sometimes extended into the door panels. It was not a cover for the top. Indeed most cars didn't have top, the bolster often interfering with mounting one. The hanl negley car's bolster stop just short of the bodywork, I believe it used snaps mounted to the body to mount the top over the bolster. Some cars extended the bolster to a full wraparound aling the door sides. A very famous example of this is the Eddie Dye '29 Roadster built by the Ayala Brothers in 1950-51. The doors on the cra were welded shut and molded in. You simply vaulted into the car. It was extremely low.
    The Eddie '29 Ford Roadster:



  13. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic '32 Ford High-Bolster Roadster - 8-23 Update   

    Thanks Tom!
    Now for the progress report. I got the bolster finished up. The larger cracks and seams were filled with more styrene stock, the whole thing sanded to final shape, and then a skim coat of putty applied and finish sanded. I think it came out with a nice rounded continuous shape that suits the car.

    Trying to keep this firmly in the 40’s time frame requires a considerable number of detail changes to the venerable Revell Deuce kit. First off was installing a ’30 rear cross member from a Revell ’30 Sedan kit. I’ll be using the buggy spring and shocks from that kit as well. I decided to go with the Columbia 2-speed rear axle from the Revell ’40 Ford Standard Coupe kit, which will contribute it’s flathead as well. The Columbia rear axle was a popular hop up in the 30’s and early 40’s since it allowed extra high gearing using the axle’s overdrive 2nd speed for dry lakes speed runs while permitting good street driveability for daily driving. I had to cut down the width of the axle to fit the Deuce, so while I was at it I adapted the rear axle ends from the Deuce kits.
    Besides the rear end the chassis required some detailing and clean up. I used the Revell ’32 Sedan. flathead motor mount, so I removed the standard Revell motor mounts for the small block Ford V8. I also filled the notch in the frame for the modern cross steering as well as the bumper bracket notches on the ends of the frame rails. I also applied a strip of 010 styrene around the frame horns to represent the channels on the stock frame horns. The front suspension will be from the Revell ’30 Sedan kit using the dropped front axle and preserving the posable steering.
    The wheels will be the Kelsey Hayes style wires that come in the Revell ’32 Ford sedan kit. I’ve figured out how to narrow them to fit 40’s era narrow tires while still preserving the kit chrome. Like the Hank Negley roadster referred to above, I’ll be running chrome rims and hub caps with black painted spokes. The front tires will be plain old AMT Firestones while the rears are the very cool period correct truck tires that I get from Herb Deeks every year at the NNL West (you can buy them from him on eBay as well).
    The stock firewall is one of Norm Veber’s incredible castings from Replicas & Miniatures Co. of Maryland. So thin, so smooth, so styrene like! How does he do it? It even comes with a matching hood with a relieved rear edge for a perfect fit. The hood comes smooth so I glued some .030 half-round stock down the middle to represent the hood hinge.
    And finally, I hogged out the inside of the Revell Deuce Roadster kit dashboard to remove the 8-track cassette player (?), radio and air conditioning vents. I substituted a blank panel and hope to be able to apply a range of p/e gauge rings and decals from Model Car Garage.

    Next up, suspension engineering, then the flathead, primer and paint.
    Thanx for lookin’,
    B.
     
  14. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic '32 Ford High-Bolster Roadster - 8-23 Update   

    Thanx everyone! Yeah, a big bolster can definitely get in the way. How about the one on this '27T seen at the lakes around '48:

    It's just about the whole seat. But as you'll see below there seems to have been a way to accommodate them!
    I made quite a bit of progress in the past week or so, but before getting to that I thought I’s share a bit more hot rod lore since it seems to have been so well received. I finally trackd down the car that is inspiring this project. It’s one that I’ve noticed quite often in various books and on line but I only recently was able to put a name to the pictures. It’s the Hank Negley roadster, sometimes referred to as the Hank Negley C-Class roadster because of its success at the dry lakes after WWII. Negley started it in 1938, put it in mothballs for the duration during the war, and raced it on the lakes throughout the late 40’s. It was also the inspiration for the far more famous Joe Nitti Roadster. Nitti was a close friend and Negley helped him build his version.
    This is the Negley car as it looked immediately prior to Negley shipping out to war, presumably in 1942 or so. It already has a nice rubber rake, but sports Kelsey Hays wires and a stock hood. The b&w photo makes it look black but it was in fact a deep purple for which it was well known among California hot rodders. This will be the version my build will most closely resemble.

    This is the best known photo of the car, in its classic post-war version complete with louvered hood and tubular shocks, ready to go 123.79 MPH on the dry lakes in 1947.

    Home from the war the roadster was also Hank’s daily driver, including a trip to Denver across the continental divide Somehow he managed to fit a top to the car despite the fairly pronounced bolster and the by-then chopped windshield. This was one classy ride, no doubt about it!



    Next, my progress so far…
    Thanx for lookin’,
    B.
  15. Bernard Kron added a post in a topic 1940 Ford Sedan delivery Deluxe.   

    Thanks Tulio. I never realized Tamiya paint was so mild. It's sure smells strong! LOL Was the underlying plastic the usual AMT medium gray?