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Bernard Kron

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    Seattle, WA
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    Bernard Kron

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  1. I just remembered this thread. Such a cool idea! I thought I'd give it a bump with this recent 100% pure Spare Parts build: scratch built chassis, homemade decals, leftover Revellogram '30 Ford Sedan body and spare-box motor and rolling stock used to build this Salt Lakes racer:
  2. Just finished this AMT-based channeled roadster. It's a tribute to David di Falco's Preservation-style '30 Ford Channeled Roadster featured in this 2016 Jalopy Journal post: A Fly in Amber: The di Falco Roadster. AMT body channeled over Revell Deuce rails with Revell '40 Ford Street Rod Flathead, Revell '40 Ford and Modelhaus 120 big 'n' little whtewalls.
  3. Thanks to you all for the kind words. As I may have mentioned elsewhere, I don't do weathering very often, maybe once every couple of years. It's partially because the proverbial Clean Build is something I admire so much in other builders and because the Clean Build is something that continues to elude me to some degree. Ironically, however, I seem to have a knack for weathering, and I certainly enjoy doing it. I think in the final analysis, clean or weathered, it's realism that floats my boat personally, even if I admire the ability others have to execute more "cartoonish" stylized projects just as much. Anyway, this was a fun project because it went so quickly for me and seemed to play to whatever strengths I may have as a modeler. Again, thanks for your comments and interest. It's greatly appreciated! B.
  4. This is a beautifully conceived and executed project. I'm very much looking forward to the results Under Glass. Bravo!
  5. Thanks everyone! Here's the completed model Under Glass with the final presentation photos:
  6. Thanks Bill. Here's the post Under Glass with the final presentation photos:
  7. Channeled 1929 Ford Roadster Hot Rod in Original As-Found Patina (More photos below) In 2016 Joey Ukrop wrote a wonderful piece for the H.A.M.B. entitled “A Fly in Amber: The di Falco Roadster” (see: https://www.jalopyjournal.com/?p=31244 ). Accompanying the article were some very evocative photos Ukrop took which captured the hot rod spirit of this marvelous ’30 Ford Roadster . David di Falco is a hot rodder, fabricator and artisan with a shop north of San Francisco. He built his roadster in the modern Preservation style where the car is completely gone through to rebuild, restore and where necessary replace the original parts to render the machine mechanically sound, reliable and safe, while maintaining the “as-found” patina and period correct parts wherever possible. In di Falco’s case the car originally had no radiator shell, interior or windshield and had some fairly serious rust perforation in front of the doors. Di Falco cleaned up the rust and covered the perforated areas with bare metal panels held with machine screws. For missing parts such as in the interior he endeavored to match the patina of the car as he had gotten it. The original patina is remarkably intact. The additions and changes are all true to the era of the original car and only serve to enhance its remarkable character. This is a composite photo showing the original state of the car as di Falco got it and the action shot that inspired me to do this project. Obviously this is more of a tribute than a replica. I left off the bare metal patch panels because I thought they were a bit exaggerated. The body is a ’29 Ford and not a ’30 and my dashboard and steering wheel are different, as well as the carburetion on the flathead. Here’s a breakdown on the parts used and the work done. Bodywork:AMT ’29 Ford Roadster with AMT ’34 Ford Truck grill. Paint is Tamiya TS-16 yellow over Duplicolor Metallic Silver lacquer and Brite Touch Red Oxide Primer, in that order. The paint was sanded and distressed to achieve the patina, then gone over with thin black wash and dusted lightly with light gray and rust weathering powders. Headlights are AMT ’32 Ford and tail lights are from the Revell ’32 Ford Street Rod Roadster kit. The windshield is from the AMT ’29 Ford Roadster. Chassis and Suspension:The chassis is based on Revell ’32 Ford Street Rod Roadster rails, pinched to fit under the ‘29 Ford body. The floor pan is also narrowed Revell Deuce. The rear suspension including the rear cross member, rear axle, and tubular shocks are from AMT ’29 Ford Roadster kit. The front suspension consists of a scratch built front spring and a 4 ½ inch deep drop front axle. It is a resin copy of the item found in the various Revell ’40 Ford Street Rod kits. It’s made by ThePartsBox.com and features a cast-in wire to prevent sagging over time. It’s my go-to beam axle for hot rod work. The steering, shock mounts and front shocks are Revell ’32 Ford and the radius rods are cut from the stock AMT ’29 Ford items. Motor and Transmission:These are from the various Revell ’40 Ford Street Rod kits (coupe and convertible) and is built straight out of the kit with the Edelbrock heads and twin carbs. Wheels and Tires:The front wheels are AMT ’40 Ford steelies with Modelhaus T120 whitewalls. The rear tires and whitewalls are from the Revell ’40 Ford Standard kit. Hubcaps and trim rings are from the AMT ‘40 Ford. Interior:The basic interior parts are fabricated using the AMT ’29 Ford bucket with the seat bottom cut down to accommodate the body channel, and scratch built dashboard and side panels. The instrument cluster and steering wheel are adapted from an AMT ’40 Ford. The shift lever is a straight pin with a yellow head. Thanx for lookin’, B.
  8. Thanks guys. Glad you all are diggin' it. I completed this project over the last few days. I’ll be posting the final presentation photos Under Glass in the next day or so. In the meantime here’s a composite shot of some of the final details. Thanks to all who followed along and… Thanx for lookin’, B.
  9. Modelhaus tires are generally proportioned to fit the o.d. of AMT 1/25th scale wheels. The wheels theysell are all to that size. There are some exceptions such as the 18" wheel 640 series (640, 647, 640 Plus, 647 Plus), and specialty tires called out for other manufacturers such as the 271 for the Revell 50 Olds kits, the 303 for Revell promos, the 400 Monogram '59 Cadillac tires, etc.
  10. Thanks to all of you for your interest and kind words. I’ve gotten the grill chopped and painted. Like the 1:1 it’s a ’34 Ford truck grill, this one from the AMT kit. I chopped it about 2 scale inches. I worked some more on the weathering on the main body, doing some additional sanding and detailing, the result being that the weathering is more visible and worn looking and yet the paint surface is more uniform and smoother. I’ll be doing similar work on the grill once the paint hardens. Hot rods like this are relatively simple machines so there’s not that much left to do, mainly completing the motor, lighting and suspension details, and then final assembly. Thanx for lookin’, B.
  11. An excellent series of comparison photos between the Stacey David Rat Roaster and the new Duvall windshield '32 Ford Roadster kit can be found here: https://newkoolestkruzers.forumactif.org/t8031-1-25-revell-32-ford-rat-roaster-vs-32-ford-roadster#240195 on the French Koolest Kruzers website. It's in French but there is so much "Franglais" English language jargon that it's easy to understand what's being said.
  12. Thanks for the pics! Much appreciated. Glad to see the chopped stock-style windshield included. Hard to see if the cowl indentations for the old windshield are filled in the photo, or indeed if the cowl has been otherwise reworked for the DuVall. The problem with the DuVall windshield is, of course, that it is highly stylized and specific, making it harder to make non-DuVall variants. But the Stacey David Rat Roaster was even worse in this regard with that horror-show perforated hood and the over-the-top stylized interior (both of which appear to have survived along with the guitar, the ribbon-mic shift lever, the chrome portholes and the Rat Roaster exhaust system - so for you Rat Roaster die-hards you probably can still build one from this kit...). Including the bucket seats is nice though. The new classic-style bench seat and interior sides, which are on their own new tree, (ditto the DuVall and the new exhausts) will help keep this kit closer to the great general purpose classic the original Street Roadster kit was. The cassette player and air-conditioning vents in the original release dashboard appear to be well and truly gone at last, LOL. Now if we could only do something about those airbags... And it looks like there will be a potential market for re-pops of the unchopped windshield and the old louvered hood sides...
  13. In 2016 Joey Ukrop wrote a wonderful piece for the H.A.M.B. entitled “A Fly in Amber: The di Falco Roadster” (see: https://www.jalopyjournal.com/?p=31244 ). Accompanying the article were some wonderfully evocative photos Ukrop took which captured the hot rod spirit of this wonderful ’30 Ford Roadster, This one in particular has stayed with me ever since: David di Falco is a hot rodder, fabricator and artisan with a shop norh of San Francisco in Petaluma California. The car he built is based on an old hot rod he bought which di Falco refurbished in the contemporary “as found” style where the car is completely gone through to rebuild, restore and where necessary replace the original parts to render the machine mechanically sound, reliable and safe, while maintaining the “as-found” patina wherever possible. In di Falco’s case he took some liberties since the car originally had no radiator shell, interior or windshield and had some fairly serious rust perforation in front of the doors. But the basic patina is intact. Di Falco cleaned up the rust and covered the perforated area with bare metal panels held with machine screws. Where he added missing parts such as in the interior he endeavored to match the patina of the car as he had gotten it. But these additions and changes are all true to the era of the original car and only serve to enhance its remarkable character. Here is the state of the car when David di Falco first got it: This project is informed and inspired by that wonderful hot rod. I’m using an AMT ’29 Ford roadster on Revell ’32 Ford chassis rails with the rear suspension from the AMT roadster. The paint is Tamiya TS-16 yellow. The front suspension uses the deep-drop front axle found in the Revell ’40 Ford street rod kits with a scratch built leaf spring. The interior is based on the AMT bucket and seat with scratch built side panels and dashboard with an instrument pod from an AMT ‘40 Ford. The flathead motor is from the AMT ’40 Ford convertible kits. The rear tires and wheels are from a Revell ‘40 Ford Standard and the front wheels are AMT ‘40 Ford with Modelhaus 120 tires. The hub caps and rings are AMT ‘40 Ford. I don’t plan on adding the sheet metal panels that di Falco used. The photos below show where I’m at so far. Thanx for lookin’, B.
  14. One of the Great Mysteries of Hot Rod Modeling is the lack of aftermarket louvered hoods for the 1/25th scale Revell ’32 Fords. After all, Revell themselves started the ball rolling with the louvered side panels on the original ’32 Ford Roadster Street Rod release of 1998. Then in 2011 they added the louvered deck with the release of their 5-window coupe variant. At that point it should have been obvious that matching louvered hoods were a logical complement to the series. So, besides wondering why Revell never offered louvered hoods (which would have helped drive sales of “parts kits” for Deuce modelers), one has to wonder why we’ve never seen them from the aftermarket. At last there is hope. The other week I was reading the most recent posts on the thread discussing the superb chopped Deuce 5-window coupe offered by Ed Fluck’s Drag City Casting from a master created by Dennis Lacy. When Dennis first announced the advent of the Drag City chopped 5-window he also showed a nice louvered hood. That was in 2019 and unfortunately it was never produced in resin. Recently some members inquired about this. This prompted MCM forum member Jason Lookabill (68shortfleet) to mention that he had “three different louvered hood for the Revell 32 Ford available”. Well it didn’t take much to get me to PM Jason asking about their availability. He sent me some pictures of three beautifully proportioned variations based on the Revell louvers – 3 row, 4 row with the stock center hinge, and 5 row. I arranged to have Jason send me one of each and was delighted to see that the photos did not deceive. The casting are absolutely top grade, the louver placements dead even and symmetric with each row of a proper length, and the fit identical to the styrene Revell kit hoods. I have several Deuces that are crying out for louvered hoods and I chose 3 roadsters where paint matching would not pose a problem. Each example was also chosen for their suitability to one of the 3 styles. First off here are 2 composites of the photos Jason sent me: Next up the 3 row hood applied to a 50’s style channeled roadster with the Revell louvered side panels. I think the symmetry and simplicity of the 3 row complements the side panels perfectly. Then the 4 row as applied to a matte black highboy. The hinge down the middle sets off the stock hood side panels and shows that this style should be particularly useful for resto-rods and street machines. A finally a Hemi powered bare metal highboy with an aggressive louvered deck treatment that has just been crying out for this full-dress 5 louver hood! Also – A work in progress Jason also sent me this tasty 6-row rood panel for the Revell ’30 Ford coupe. I don’t have a donor car for it (yet…) but I finished it in bare metal steel for this photo. Those of you with a discerning eye will notice the louvers were installed backwards, one of the many challenges facing those who take on grafting louvers. Jason also told me he’s still working at getting these to mold to a consistently high level of quality. So, consider this a work in progress. Jason has molded a small series of the louvered hoods he is making available. If you’re interested PM him here on the MCM board (68shortfleet) or email him at Lookabillj@gmail.com.
  15. Just to complete things, my order arrived today, the 13th as they said it would.
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