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Art Anderson

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About Art Anderson

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    MCM Ohana

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  • Scale I Build 1/25

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Art Anderson's Activity

  1. Art Anderson added a post in a topic 1964 Studebaker Avanti   

    Except that Studebaker built no 1965 Avanti's, as Studebaker ceased all US production in December, 1963.  Those square "custom" headlghts, though are correct for a '64 Avanti, of which a few were produced. (and of course, most Avanti II's)
    Art
  2. Art Anderson added a post in a topic Revell Foose '48 Cadillac de-Foosed   

    Chevy and Cadillac in 1949--two different cars, two different body series.  While the major styling themes are very similar, Chevrolet used GM's A Body back then, while Cadillac used the GM C-body (which was longer and wider, with some curves and major contours being rather different. Fortunately, when we modelers do such conversions, "Plastic Surgery" can be relatively easy--no torches, no welding of sheet metal.
    Art
  3. Art Anderson added a post in a topic What's next from Moebius - How about a 70 F-100 4x4 and a 65-66 F-100   

    The center crossmember of the chassis is farther forward on the '65-66. right below the rear of the cab.  The transmissions have a much shorter tailshaft, with the driveshafts of both wheelbases being markedly longer (the long wheelbase--8' bed) has a "pillow block bearing" underneath the center crossmember, to support the 2-piece driveshaft.
    Art
  4. Art Anderson added a post in a topic What's next from Moebius - How about a 70 F-100 4x4 and a 65-66 F-100   

    I spent several hours yesterday (Saturday the 9th) helping to review the first tooling mockups of the '65-66 F-100's.  Once the little niggles are corrected (there are always those with first generation tooling mockups), they will be pretty cool indeed!  Lots of features there, numerous variants--so hang on folks!
    Art
  5. Art Anderson added a post in a topic Warped Promos   

    The problems will still be very much the same:  The original Acetate promo would have suffered shrinkage, unevenly, which lead to the warping.  Unfortunately, casting the warped promo in urethane resin will only serve to transfer those problems to a new medium.
  6. Art Anderson added a post in a topic OLD Johan acetone/acytate bodies   

    The problem with "Tenite" (DuPont's trade name for the acetate plastic they invented in the late 1920's or so) has always been that it's  prone both to shrinkage and to moisture, which in the case of injection-molding, is very uneven, due to the "locked in" stresses that happen when liquified plastic of any sort is compressed into a set of hard metal dies under tremendous pressure (injection-molding machines do this with well over 100psi!), and once that acetate body shell is removed from the mold, the elements around it do start to come into play.   Ever see a cracked automobile steering wheel that was made anywhere from the late 1930's to the early 1960's?  Those were molded around formed steel units, and over time, the acetate plastic would shrink, leading to noticeable cracks in say, the rim, sometimes even in the spokes.   About the only acetate promo's I have acquired which have no warpage are those I've bought way out west, such as NNL-West, even GSL, where the air is dry, which allowed the acetate to "settle" (or whatever!) without humidity.
    Why acetate plastic, you might ask, in those promotional model cars of the 50's?  The simple, and plain answer is that "plastic" had a very bad reputation then--early styrene was hard,  and as brittle as glass--when it broke or shattered, the shards were as sharp as glass--lots of little kids back then (and I was a little kid in the late 40's-early 50's) got cut fingers from broken, cheap styrene plastic toys.  For this very reason, most quality plastic toys (and promo's WERE seen as toys!) back then were molded in acetate plastic, for the simple reason of SAFETY.
    But, what about early model car kits?  Only a few kits were ever molded in acetate--Monogram's very first model car kits were first shot in acetate, but once they realized they were not making toys, but something just a bit more serious--styrene.  When AMT Corporation came up with the idea that really put them "on the map", that being their precedent-setting 1958 "3in1 Customizing Kits",  they wisely went to styrene, even though it was a fairly brittle material,  but with the material thickness of the body shells and chassis, they did survive a lot of handling.
    About 1960, ABS plastic (I'm not even going to attempt to type out that name in full text!) came on the scene, and by 1962 or so, all promotional model cars were being made from ABS--AMT, JoHan, and by 1965, MPC.   ABS had the toughness, and shatter-proof qualities of acetate, but the stability (warping resistance) of styrene, and can be far more easily bonded to a polystyrene part today.  On the flip side of all this about acetate promo's,  I have a gorgeous '57 Chrysler Windsor that Dean Milano did almost 40 yrs ago--and it's still straight as a die, to this very day--so not all acetate promo's (this model was done from an acetate promo) warp--but that's a very random thing.
     
  7. Art Anderson added a post in a topic Large OD styrene tubing?   

    Not since the British company, Contrails, went out of business about 20 yrs ago or so.
    Art
  8. Art Anderson added a post in a topic OLD Johan acetone/acytate bodies   

    CA or epoxy are pretty much the only glues that will join Acetate plastic to polystyrene.  Solvent-based cements will bond Acetate to Acetate, styrene to styrene, but the two plastics are way dissimilar, they don't dissolve and bond well to each other.
    Art
  9. Art Anderson added a post in a topic Sedan Deliveries   

    One can add to this list the Ertl diecast '39 Bantam Sedan Delivery (which is called a panel delivery in the original packaging, but it IS passenger-car based) in the slightly larger 1:22nd scale.  I also drew that tooling from Ertl's inventory when Johnny Lightning was bought out by Ertl's then parent company, RC2 in 2004, did it up in period-correct Coca Cola livery as part of a large series of Coca Cola diecasts.  I also developed the JL 1/24 scale '57 Ford Courier Sedan Delivery for that series--that was one very fun project indeed!.
    In addition, I developed, at Johnny Lightning, the 1/18 scale diecast '55 Chevrolet Sedan Delivery (a body style that is way overdue in 1/25 by the way!) as part of that same Coca Cola series.
    Art
  10. Art Anderson added a post in a topic Sedan Deliveries   

    Mark, the late Bill Harrison (from out in California) and I had a discussion on the MPC '33 Chevrolet kit:   Bill pointed  out that the bodywork is not standard Chevrolet light truck sheet metal, but rather a custom-built body on a 1932 Chevrolet passenger car chassis, with '32 Chevy passenger car front end sheet metal.  For that reason, Bill always maintained that this vehicle was a sedan delivery, of 1/2 ton capacity, built (like virtually all early Sedels) to comply with so-called "boulevard laws" in many cities (Detroit area included) which forbade the use of "ordinary" commercial trucks on certain high-dollar residential streets.  Given Bill's extensive reference materials (literally cubic yards of the stuff, or indeed hundreds of lbs of it) I tend to agree with his assessment.  Sadly, Bill passed away about 14-15 years ago though.
    Art
  11. Art Anderson added a post in a topic Caliper/micro-meter recommendations   

    A lot depends on what one plans to use a micrometer or calipers on, frankly.  If one is needing measuring instruments for say, precision machining of metals, then go with the highest-quality instrument your wallet can afford--the greater the precision needed,  likely the higher the price of a micrometer, for example.
    On the other hand, if one is just needing (as in my case) to make measurements when working on a styrene model project, absolute precision (down to that ten-thousandth of an inch) isn't likely to matter, as one swipe of 400-grit sandpaper can remove more than that much plastic.
    As I seldom have any need for NASA-like precision, but just to measure that bit of K&S brass rod, or a strip of Evergreen styrene--or simply to determine just what size that drill bit is, that I didn't put back in my "numbered-drill" index--then the $20 or thereabouts digital calipers I can get many pllaces, does JUST fine.
    Art
  12. Art Anderson added a post in a topic white freightliner [ AMT ]   

    That was the way of it with AMT kits, back in 1971, when the Freightliner kits were first released.  That said, the parts should be easily identifiable when looking at the instructions.   Thousands of that kit got built (even I managed to build one   )
    Art
  13. Art Anderson added a post in a topic What's considered the 'Honus Wagner' (rarest) of model kits   

    "Rare"  in the context of model car kits, can be a rather subjective term, IMHO.   Many are considered to be "rare" today simply because they did not sell at all well when they were made for sale in the open market, and thus were never reissued:   The Aurora "Mod Squad" '50 Mercury wagon fits this description to a "T"  That kit languished on hobby shop shelves (Oh I know--you bought at least one is a common saying), but in reality, that model kit was in "close-out" status from hobby wholesalers (that's how model kits were distributed to hobby shops back in he day--still are) within a year of it's release--and they gathered dust and "shopwear"on hobby shop shelves.  Two factors:  First, the model kit was made by Aurora, which company wasn't even close to the "mainstream" of model car kit manufacturing--in a time when the model car kit market was dominated overwhelmingly by AMT, followed by MPC and Revell,with Monogram a very close 4th place. Adding to the relative unpopularity of the Mod Squad Mercury Wagon at the time it came out was simply that by the time the kit was released, the actual car had been run off a cliff and totally destroyed per the script of the show, in addition to its not having any building options, which were the norm for the then-"Big Three" model car kit manufacturers.  Thus, its rarity today is the result, not of a deliberately short production run--but a sincere lack of enthusiasm on the part of kids ages about ten to fifteen at the time of its being produced.
    At the other end of the spectrum were kits such as the SMP 1911 Chevrolet:  That kit was tooled, and produced for Chevrolet as an exclusive promotional item in 1961--the 50th Anniversary of the founding of the Chevrolet Motor Car Company by William C. Durant and his partners. This model was produced both in kit form, as well as a ready-assembled promotional model (in raw black styrene with a dull metallic gold body, and gold-toned plated parts, curbside only.  However, this model was for distribution, on a "one-time" basis, to Chevrolet dealerships only, not for general mass distribution to all comers in the retail business (although some may have made it into hobby shops via a local Chevy dealership.  Once that production order was done at SMP,  the tooling  (ostensibly cut in aluminum) was destroyed, per terms of the contract with GM & Chevrolet.  As such, the vast majority of model car builders in 1961 (I would have been 16yrs old, going on 17 then) were completely unaware that the kit or promo even existed.  Also, quite likely, the model kit, if offered through the hobby industry distribution channel, would have died quickly, due to the obscurity of the subject (the '11 Chevrolet was a prototype only, the first production Chevrolet's only barely resembled it) and it was a kit of an antique car with absolutely no building options--which in 1961 were essential for the popularity of a model car kit.  That said, had I known of this kit or promo--I'd have hustled my buns to Horner Chevrolet (owned by a HS classmate's family!) at 11th and Main Streets in Downtown Lafayette in a NY minute, bought at least one, kit or promo at the time--but that's another story.
     
  14. Art Anderson added a post in a topic What's considered the 'Honus Wagner' (rarest) of model kits   

    "Rare"  in the context of model car kits, can be a rather subjective term, IMHO.   Many are considered to be "rare" today simply because they did not sell at all well when they were made for sale in the open market, and thus were never reissued:   The Aurora "Mod Squad" '50 Mercury wagon fits this description to a "T"  That kit languished on hobby shop shelves (Oh I know--you bought at least one is a common saying), but in reality, that model kit was in "close-out" status from hobby wholesalers (that's how model kits were distributed to hobby shops back in he day--still are) within a year of it's release--and they gathered dust and "shopwear"on hobby shop shelves.  Two factors:  First, the model kit was made by Aurora, which company wasn't even close to the "mainstream" of model car kit manufacturing--in a time when the model car kit market was dominated overwhelmingly by AMT, followed by MPC and Revell,with Monogram a very close 4th place. Adding to the relative unpopularity of the Mod Squad Mercury Wagon at the time it came out was simply that by the time the kit was released, the actual car had been run off a cliff and totally destroyed per the script of the show, in addition to its not having any building options, which were the norm for the then-"Big Three" model car kit manufacturers.  Thus, its rarity today is the result, not of a deliberately short production run--but a sincere lack of enthusiasm on the part of kids ages about ten to fifteen at the time of its being produced.
    At the other end of the spectrum were kits such as the SMP 1911 Chevrolet:  That kit was tooled, and produced for Chevrolet as an exclusive promotional item in 1961--the 50th Anniversary of the founding of the Chevrolet Motor Car Company by William C. Durant and his partners. This model was produced both in kit form, as well as a ready-assembled promotional model (in raw black styrene with a dull metallic gold body, and gold-toned plated parts, curbside only.  However, this model was for distribution, on a "one-time" basis, to Chevrolet dealerships only, not for general mass distribution to all comers in the retail business (although some may have made it into hobby shops via a local Chevy dealership.  Once that production order was done at SMP,  the tooling  (ostensibly cut in aluminum) was destroyed, per terms of the contract with GM & Chevrolet.  As such, the vast majority of model car builders in 1961 (I would have been 16yrs old, going on 17 then) were completely unaware that the kit or promo even existed.  Also, quite likely, the model kit, if offered through the hobby industry distribution channel, would have died quickly, due to the obscurity of the subject (the '11 Chevrolet was a prototype only, the first production Chevrolet's only barely resembled it) and it was a kit of an antique car with absolutely no building options--which in 1961 were essential for the popularity of a model car kit.  That said, had I known of this kit or promo--I'd have hustled my buns to Horner Chevrolet (owned by a HS classmate's family!) at 11th and Main Streets in Downtown Lafayette in a NY minute, bought at least one, kit or promo at the time--but that's another story.
     
  15. Art Anderson added a post in a topic AMT American LaFrance Custom Pumper Kit Review AMT1053   

    Your link works just fine!