Art Anderson

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About Art Anderson

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  • Scale I Build 1/25

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Art Anderson's Activity

  1. Art Anderson added a post in a topic New project: 1932 Duesenberg Model J, Berline coachwork by Le Rouge   

    Did some work on the engine this week:  First up was to correct some deficiencies in my exhaust manifold casting (note: the original Model J exhaust manifold is quite different from the SJ supercharger manifold, and different from later-year manifold as well--having it's "exit" at the center rather than at the rear end of the casting)  Done, but not visible in this picture of the unpainted engine is my "defining" of the cam covers.  
    Even though a DOHC engine, a Model J straight 8 has THREE cam covers, due to the distributor being driven off the middle of the intake camshaft, and non of the cam covers are at all defined on the model engine.  So, my trusty razor saw to the rescue, to scribe the joints between cam covers and cylinder head, which will show up once the engine is painted (Apple Green for all the cast iron parts, varying shades of silver for the aluminum parts.

  2. Art Anderson added a post in a topic Will we ever see their like again?   

    My experiences and memories of those times EXACTLY!
  3. Art Anderson added a post in a topic New project: 1932 Duesenberg Model J, Berline coachwork by Le Rouge   

    No, not directly!     I did cast, from a Lee Baker master,  the Judkins 3-window Model J coupe, and for that one, Lee used a Monogram '30 Model A coupe "greenhouse" as the basis for that portion of the Judkins body--but it bears no clear resemblance to anything Ford ever did.
    Art
  4. Art Anderson added a post in a topic New project: 1932 Duesenberg Model J, Berline coachwork by Le Rouge   

    LONG out of production, unfortunately.  I stopped resin casting in late 1999, when I reluctantly took on a full time job at the University here.
  5. Art Anderson added a post in a topic 32/30 Ford front suspension options?   

    Pretty much the way many cross-torsion bar setups work on oval track dirt cars.
  6. Art Anderson added a post in a topic New project: 1932 Duesenberg Model J, Berline coachwork by Le Rouge   

    Working on the engine right now!
    Art
  7. Art Anderson added a post in a topic New project: 1932 Duesenberg Model J, Berline coachwork by Le Rouge   

    Uh, finally someone nailed it!  That body was done, by the late Lee Baker, out of Chattanooga TN back in 1997--from FOUR AMT 1932 Ford Tudor Sedan bodies!  Great call, Richard!  
  8. Art Anderson added a post in a topic New project: 1932 Duesenberg Model J, Berline coachwork by Le Rouge   

    Keep thinking, and you will discover where this body shell came from!
  9. Art Anderson added a post in a topic New project: 1932 Duesenberg Model J, Berline coachwork by Le Rouge   


    Uh keep working on the derivation of tha coachbuilder's name--you'll slap your forehead when you stumble on to it!   As for color, not finalized, but I am leaning toward Clay Rust, which was a Cord 810 color, but still good for 1932.
     
     
  10. Art Anderson added a post in a topic New project: 1932 Duesenberg Model J, Berline coachwork by Le Rouge   

    Le Rouge?  VERY prolific body builder!  
     
  11. Art Anderson added a post in a topic Printers plate developer   

    And, soft aluminum in the bargain!
    Art
  12. Art Anderson added a topic in On The Workbench   

    New project: 1932 Duesenberg Model J, Berline coachwork by Le Rouge
    This is a resin body I cast about 20 years ago, under the name All American Models.  The body was mastered by the late Lee Baker, of Chattanooga TN.   It will be a non-supercharged Model J--a few engine modifications had to happen there!
     

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  13. Art Anderson added a post in a topic Why the variety in scales?   

    OK, here's some food for thought:
    1/72 scale seems to have begun with WW-II "recognition" models of aircraft, used widely in both the US and the UK to train anti-aircraft gunners and spotters as to "Friend or Foe".
    1/40 scale was chosen by Revell for their military vehicle and artillery kits, as they could fit the kits into their then-standard series of model kit boxes.
    1/48 scale became a popular scale for model aircraft kits, beginning first with Lindberg and then popularized by Monogram.   Foreign kit manufacturers, seeing the sheer popularity of Monogram's military aircraft simply followed that company's lead
    1/43 scale model cars were first introduced to match the scale that diecast toy car mfr's such as Corgi, Dinky, and Solido were producing--and the scale stuck around.
    1/32 scale is the scale first used for plastic model car kits--Hudson Miniatures plastic antique cars, and of course, Revell's Highway Pioneers. It became a somewhat popular aircraft scale by the early 1960's, with Monogram leading the way with their Grumman F3F carrier-based biplane fighter, and some tank kits followed soon afterward.
    1/25 scale makes a lot of sense, as in this scale, 40-thousandths of an inch is one scale inch on the model.
    1/24 scale was popularized by Monogram, probably given that there designers and pattern-makers were comfortable with 1/48, and 1/24 is simply twice that size.
    1/20 scale has had a small following, popularized by MPC's founder, George Toteff who supposedly wanted a line of model car kits in a larger scale, but not as large as what others were doing
    1/18 scale has had only a handful of plastic kits produced in that size--notably the Tamiya McLaren M8A kit.
    1/16 scale was popularized by Revell, who wanted to do larger scale model car kits, but not so large that modelers would only buy one or two due to space considerations, as well as cost/price.
    1/12 scale came into its own when Tamiya introduced their line of Formula 1 kits in this scale--again as a way of producing larger, much more detailed kits at the time.
    1/8 scale happened simply to grab attention, and Monogram's 1/8 scale model car kits certainly did that in spades in the 1960's.
    Art