Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

Force

Members
  • Posts

    3,704
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by Force

  1. I am the original poster.
    For the record, I have nothing against old topics, it's not that, I read them myself from time to time...but...I don't reply and with that dig them up to the surface if it's several months or even years since the last reply in the topic was written...and if I do, wich is very rare, it's to add important and useful information to the topic itself.
    The old topics are here to find for every one and it's for sure a treasure, but I prefer to leave them where they are as topics from down deep are "cold" for most people who has been members here for a long time...otherwise they would not be down there would they...because "hot" topics stay near the surface on the first few pages in the categories regardless of how old they are.
    Yes every topic you haven't read is "new" to you but for the people who have read them months or years ago they are quite cold and not worth digging up again as at least I have left them allready and moved on...on the other hand, some topics can be worth to reintroduce like if a project that has been sleeping for a while and came back to the bench and being worked on again or something like that, but most aren't.
    So most of the time I think it's better to start a new topic instead of digging up an old one from several years back where pictures in the thread may not work and are long gone, and the OP and others who has replied to the specific topic might not even be here on the forum anymore...if you want to ask the OP or someone else in a topic from several months or years back a question about something...send a PM to them instead of putting it in a reply wich automatically will lift the old topic from the down deep where it was to the top of the first page in that category.

    You don't have to agree with me but that's my view of the matter and lets leave it with that.

  2. 10 hours ago, ranma said:

    The only one real issue with this kit that bugs me is the Chrome suspension part's front and rear.

    It's easier to remove the chrome plating than to have to send the parts away to have vacuum chrome plating done and it comes in the box with no extra charge.
    So I prefer plated parts even if it's wrong because I have the freedom of choice depending on what I'm going to build, I mean if you build a custom car or maybe a lowrider you might want to have these parts plated and if you are building a factory stock just soak the parts for a while in some bleach or Super Clean to remove the plating and undercoat...easy as pie and really not much extra work.

  3. I find "like buttons" you click and it only shows a number of likes because so impersonal and don't show much engagement, it's more like click and forget and don't really show that you care.
    It's a lot more personal to take the time and really write something in the topic even if it only says like, great, nice or whatever, it shows the topic starter that you personally care a lot more than a "like button" will ever do.
    But that's me.

  4. On 5/4/2021 at 6:20 PM, Mark said:

    I don't think the top is chopped, so much as I'm thinking the windshield opening isn't tall enough at the top.  If you look at photos of 1:1 sedans, the top of the molding around the windshield is about level with the top of the drip rail over the doors.  It might be the molding is thicker than it needs to be, it might be that the opening could be filed open a bit higher (say, to the top of the existing molding) and a new upper molding added or scribed in.  Yes, it would be nice to not have to do it, but this doesn't look like a deal killer by any stretch of the imagination.

    Exactly my thought.
    It would look a lot better with that fix like on the AMT 1966 Ford Fairlane kits.

  5. On 5/4/2021 at 5:45 PM, 89AKurt said:

    Didn't know they built Euro spec cars!

    Of course they did, lots of US made cars were sold new over here in Sweden and other parts of Europe, the most notable difference is the kilometer scale on the speedometer/odometer instead of miles since most European countries converted to metric well before the 1960's starting with France 1795, otherwise the cars are pretty much the same as the US couterparts.

  6. Can't go there, Hot Rod is blocked.

    Due to the EU's Global Data Protection Regulation, our website is currently unavailable to visitors from most European countries. We apologize for this inconvenience and encourage you to visit www.motortrend.com for the latest on new cars, car reviews & news, concept cars and auto show coverage, awards and much more.

    I can't understand this BLAH_BLAH_BLAH_BLAH Motor Trend Group/Discovery Inc are keeping up with, the GDPR was legislated in the EU countries 2016 and the Motor Trend Group websites, except for the Motor Trend site wich I'm not interested in, are the only ones we can't get in to from Europe even now 5 years later, at least not what I have seen so far and I visit lots of US websites.

  7. Yes it's a bit strange NASCAR allowed the Boss 429 in the Ford Torino and Mercury Cyclone when these cars weren't available with this particular engine.
    I mean, Mopar did it fairly right because except for 1964-65 Race Hemi the 426 Hemi was indeed available to get for a customer in the car models used on track in NASCAR racing.
    Today it's different because the Ford FR9 they use now developed and built by Roush-Yates is not available in any car, it's not related to any other engine as they started with a clean sheet and designed it from scratch especially for NASCAR use

  8. The LS is a great engine but so ugly they have to hide it under a bunch of plastic covers like they do in the original cars. :rolleyes:
    I wonder why they can't design a good engine that looks nice nowadays, Chip Foose said one time that the engine is "a jewel in a jewel box and should look good when you open the hood".

  9. I presume you are after a modern LS7 based on the modern LS series engine...but there was a LS7 before that wich was a version of the 454 big block.

  10. It depends on what type of magneto it is, this one does.
    A magneto is a distributor like any with the difference that a Magneto produces it's own current for the spark, so if you get the engine going when you have a magneto you don't need a battery or charging system for it to continue running and it will do so until you short it out.
    Magnetos are widely used on air craft piston engines wich often have two separate magnetos, and other stuff where you need the ignition to work even if external power like a battery and alternator/generator fails.

  11. I think the old tool AMT 57 Chevy is quite good if you take in consideration when it was developed, I mean how many kits from 1963 is perfect.
    Of course it has it's flaws but it builds up good...at least after what I remember from when I built one last.

  12. Ehh...Car Craft...it was from another publisher, The Enthusiast Network, TEN for short and now called the Motor Trend Group, wich appearently is under the Discovery Inc. umbrella, yes the Kabel TV Network...and has noting to do with The Rodders Journal.
    TEN/MTG killed off most of their publications 2019.

    In TRJ case I belive it started with the headquarters move from California to Virginia and then the Covid thing came along...but other publications have had no trouble getting out their copys to the subscribers, I have a couple more magazines on subscription and they come as they should.
    The last thing I got from TRJ was the 2020 Holliday Catalog and a few email updates back in late January, nothing after that.

  13. That's the 7 litre 427 Mk II P/1047 entered by Shelby American at Le Mans 24 Hours 1966 and sister car to the winner P/1046 but retired from the race, it also entered the Daytona 24 Hours the same year and did not finish that race either.
    This car was later upgraded to Mk IIB configuration painted blue and entered Le Mans 24 Hours again 1967 by Shelby American and retired from the race, later Ford France entered the car in the Trofeo Frescobaldi Mugello race the same year wich it also retired from, and a couple of other races like the 12 Hour Reims race wich it won.

    This kit has a one piece body like all of the other Fujimi Mk II kits, the rear section can be opened but there is not much under there, the transaxle, rear suspension and the rear part of the exhaust are there but no engine and other stuff.

  14. 4 hours ago, TransAmMike said:

    No problem at all. Hope you understand about the wires. I don't know about the calipers. I'm thinking in scale the rotors are just too big for the 14 or 15" Camaro wheel. 

    Yes, the Pegasus brake rotors and calipers are for their own wheels wich are larger like 18-19-20" but they will fit other large wheels, so they are too big for smaller stock style 14-15" wheels.

  15. I wonder why they put grooves on the discs in the first place, there are no grooves on most of the disc brakes around and if there are meant to be grooves and holes they don't look like that because you want as much braking surface as possible for them to be efficient, so these should be flat smooth surfaced ventilated discs with no grooves.

    What I don't understand is if you make the effort to develop a model kit of something and don't bother to take the time and do the research to do it right while you are at it.
    Develop and cut the tool for a correct kit doesn't cost more than to do the same thing for an incorrect kit so it can't be that, and if you do a correct kit the good reputation and the positive reception from the market you get is worth a lot and boost the sales of mentioned kit, and that can't be a bad thing.
    I mean in this case there are lots of information and a gazillion pictures of GT40 Mk II's everywhere on the internet so it's not that hard to get most of the model kit right without doing too much work other than spend a few hours on the computer and see how things on the car should look, of course it's preferable if you have access to a real car because it will help a lot.
    When it comes to smaller details like wiring and plumbing there are lots of information on that too so it's not that hard to get right either, and it helps if you know what the purpose of the parts on the car are like the oil coolers, expansion tank for the cooling system, fuel tanks, fuel pumps, oil reservior, oil pumps and so on, so to have some basic knowledge about the car and how it's engineered is good because If you know how things looks and works it's a lot easier to understand what to do.

×
×
  • Create New...