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Longbox55

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About Longbox55

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  • Birthday 08/07/1971

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    Danville Il
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    Bill Burmeister

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  1. The Deserter would not be correct for a stock '60-'66 Chevrolet 4x4 suspension. GM made major changes to their 4x4s in '67, one of which was the use of a reverse arch tapered leaf spring in the front. The '60-'66 used a traditional arched spring. A much closer source for the correct springs would be the AMT '55 or '57 Cameo/Stepside kits, though you would need to add 3 leaves to the front to be 100% correct. The transfer case from the Deserter would also not be correct, as the NP 203 in that kit did not come out until '73. The closest in scale transfer case I have found to the Timken 221 would be the transfer case from the old AMT Thunderbolt One/Thunderbolt Two kits. Even then, it would need some alterations to accurate. I won't speak for the accuracy of the axle from the Bronco kit, as I have not seen one in person, but I can say that a Dana 60 would not be correct. GM did not use the Dana 60 as a front drive axle until '77, and then only in the K30 1 ton trucks.
  2. Wouldn't work for a correct panel truck. The sedan delivery is a passenger car based body, which is not the same as truck.
  3. James, the Full View window was available on all conventional and LCF cab trucks, even the larger models. The Deluxe cab, which is a separate option, could also be had, but would be rare to find it on a big truck. On the model names, Apache was the model name for 1/2 through 1 ton, regardless of drive configuration. The Viking covered the 1 1/2 ton and 2 ton models, and Spartan was the 2 1/2 ton. Chevrolet used those model names until '62, though they only appeared in advertising for '62. The early name used for the 4x4 models that used the Napco system was the Mountain Goat. That name was mainly used for trucks that were converted by the dealer to 4x4, not the '57-'59 with the factory installed system. Both 4x4 systems are identical, though.
  4. To answer the question, no, it does not bubble up in an ultrasonic cleaner. In fact, it actually works very well in one for stripping paint. The combination of the heat plus the ultrasonic action makes it work faster. However, you do want to use some caution doing this. One, don't leave the heat on once it's up to temp, as it will start to make vapors that you definitely do not want to breathe. Warm is fine, hot isn't. Also, if you use it with resin, either avoid using heat, or keep it very low. I almost toasted a Flintstone A 100 van body by leaving in with too much heat. Fortunately, I caught it and straightened it out. And finally, when you're done, empty the Superclean/Purple Power/Zep out of the cleaner and rinse it out good. While the tubs in the cleaners are generally stainless, and the ye base cleaners will not hurt them, it could potentially cause problems with other components of the cleaner if left in it.
  5. I can speak from experience that you do NOT want to soak styrene in denatured alcohol, as it will soften the plastic, or at least it did for me. The method that Ace quoted from the railroad guys should work fine, though. I would suggest testing first before you proceed to doing the whole body just to be sure.
  6. Just a quick check on the Drastic Plastic instructions site, it appears that it was in both kits. I can say, though, that at least the '80s and newer issues of the hardtop do not have it. I have several of those, and have never seen the tray, or several of the other parts shown in the original, in it.
  7. This truck is painted Skyline Blue. While does have more green in it that you would think, the color on the Corvair is definitely not Skyline Blue.
  8. Shouldn't be an issue on a Jeep, they use the Chrysler SKREEM system, which is the most user freindly TPMS setup being used. All it takes to reset is driving the vehicle for about 15 minutes at over 20 mph to reset. no crazy learn procedure (Ford is very bad about that) or special tools required..
  9. Shouldn't have to go to the dealership for that. any competent tire dealer will have the equipment to reset the TPMS, which not only need reset with a tire installation, but also any time the tires are rotated.
  10. You're right on target on this one. In addition to what you've stated, China is also notorious for not letting impoted vehicles to be sold in China. Subaru tries to break into the Chinese market a while back with cars that were built in their US plant, none of them were sold because the Chinese wouldn't allow them in. Last I heard, the cars that got shipped are still sitting on the docks, and the ones that are still here are being used as a windbreak fence behind the plant.
  11. Fortunately, the N series Ford tractors are very easy to get parts for. Most parts are even still available from the dealers, which in this case would be any Case-IH-New Holland dealer (they bought out Ford/New Holland a few years ago). Farm supply stores, like Tractor Supply, are another good source for parts.
  12. The basic suspension is the same on 2wd GM trucks from '63-'87, plus up to '91 for Suburban and some models of 1 ton. The '88 and up are completely different.
  13. I see that the box art has the same error that the Texaco version does. They have the truck illustrated with a vent window in the doors. A '50 would not have those, as they weren't used on the 1:1 until '51.
  14. The M2 was tooled in house, it isn't a repop of the old Danbury Mint die cast.
  15. You may want to contact the caster that made the body to find out what they suggest. I can't speak for all casters, but I do know that Modelhaus and Jimmy Flintstone resins both do very well with Superclean. Modelhaus even suggested Superclean in their instructions.
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