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traditional

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About traditional

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  • Location
    Ottawa, Canada
  • Full Name
    Clifford Read

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  1. Daytona 500

    I did not watch the race (I'm a sprintcar fan only) but I read some comments from the post race and here is what the fellow who was blocking and got wrecked at the end said. His comment is quoted below (Jeff Gluck was the interviewer) Jeff Gluck ✔@jeff_gluck I asked Aric Almirola if Dillon was being too aggressive with that move: "Ha! He's not driving too aggressively, he's trying to win the Daytona 500 -- just like I was." https://twitter.com/louis_wagner/status/965373811574165505 … 6:57 PM - Feb 18, 2018
  2. I took these pics in answer to a post in the 'general' forum so since I have them, they might as well be on here as well: The D-type Jaguars were one of my favorite sports racecars (from an era when style mattered and racecars were easily identified). As well as building models, I also collect some diecasts and this 1/18 metal model (mostly stamped metal body) from EXOTO back in 2011 was without a doubt the most I've ever spent on a model (even though it was on sale at the time of my purchase), but It remains, however, the most absurdly detailed model I've ever acquired. Although some versions of the Exoto D-types are still available from Exoto, the prices are now in the stratosphere. Because of the extensive detail, the model is quite fragile and just about every time I remove it from its display case, there's some part that I have to fasten back in place. This particular car evidently won the Reims 12 hour race in 1954, driven by Whitehead and Wharton.
  3. Someone say "D" Type ?

    The d-types were one of my favorite sports racecars (when style mattered and racecars were easily identified). As well as building models, I also collect some diecasts and this 1/18 metal model (mostly stamped metal body) from EXOTO back in 2011 was without a doubt the most I've ever spent on a model (even though it was on sale at the time of my purchase), but It remains, however, the most absurdly detailed model I've ever acquired. Although some versions of the Exoto D-types are still available from Exoto, the prices are now in the stratosphere. Because of the extensive detail, the model is quite fragile and just about every time I remove it from its display case, there's some part that I have to fasten back in place. This particular car evidently won the Reims 12 hour race in 1954, driven by Whitehead and Wharton. I hope my photos do it justice. This post on D-types seemed like a good time to finally take a few pics of the model.
  4. I've gathered reference of 1959 to 1967 VW Double Cab Pickups over many years and planned a full feature model (opening doors, steering, etc). Wanting to build a '60 to '61 version, I've opted to rework a 1/24 MotorMax '64 diecast toy for durability. My previous attempt to modify a plastic VW bus model (Revell) 25 years ago was less than successful. It became fragile and unstable as I added many working details and features. The MotorMax toy, though interesting, is very basic with no opening doors, no steering, no engine, very limited interior and under floor/chassis detail, and disproportionate rear side windows, wheels/hubcaps, etc. I had also acquired a badly damaged donor VW Bus toy that was reasonable starting material for floor/chassis, engine, etc. My project got underway as I stripped the paint off the MotorMax, and carved open all doors and access panels using my rotary tool, razor saw and files. I scratch-built the complete styrene '61 style interior (including folding seat access to spare tire and storage bin), door jams, brass window frames, spare wheel, brass and styrene steering, assorted engine details, wiring, brass canvas rear cover and hoops, brass door and panel hinges, brass gate panel retainers, styrene wheel rims, brass and styrene European style bumpers, etc. As well as adding details such as inner and outer door handles, wipers, chassis jacking points, inner gate structure, etc., the model now features opening front and rear doors, opening gas filler door, opening action for side gates, opening engine access panel, full chassis, and full engine detail. I've filed off the '64 era directional signals and substituted my own '61 style units. Paint details: -Main body, correct Dove Blue (basecoat/clearcoat) -wheels, bumpers, correct Silver-White (automotive touch up) -hubcaps, correct grey with white inserts (enamel) -interior fiberboard panels, satin grey (automotive Duplicolor primer) -assorted details, (Testors, Tamiya, Humbrol paints)
  5. Mid '70s Hino HE 345 tractor and container trailer

    Hello, Evan, Although I'd never seen the real trucks from Japan in that era, I found the following info translated from a Japanese site and just assume that it was accurate. This is where I got my timeline info for the change to set-back axle. Perhaps the change just became a complete change at that time while the non-set-back was available up until then as well. I have no first-hand knowledge about that era of Japanese trucks: Hino HE 345 information In 1971 Hino introduced a totally new version of its heavy tractor HE, produced since the beginning of sixties. Projected both for internal market and for the great exportation, it was equipped with the same cab shown in 1970 for the vehicles of the medium range KB. Because of the larger dimensions of the engine, the cab was mounted on a higher position, with a very particular look produced by the short frontal overhang and by the larger width at the mudguards height (2490 mm) compared to the cab width (2140 mm at windscreen height). The HE series was available only as tractor: in Japan and other Asiatic countries was available with Hino engines from 235 to 415 hp (a real record for that time). It was produced in two basic versions: HE 445 (with 270 hp EF100 V8 aspirated engine) and HE 435 (with 235 hp ED100 six cylinders in line engine). For models with right hand drive the code names were HE 345E and HE 335E. The HE remained in production up to 1982: in 1980 it was renewed with a longer front overhang now at 1270 mm and a cab completely renewed inside. The renewed HE was available also with 260 hp EK 100 engine. From 1971 to 1982, the HE was produced, in the various versions, in almost 12.000 units, of which near 4.000 sold in Japan. It was also sold in different countries of Central and South America, in Mediterranean Africa (particularly in Algeria with almost 5.000 units), in all the Eastern Asia and in many European countries such as France, Portugal, Greece and Ireland. This last was its best European market with 1833 units sold.
  6. '33 Ford Sedan Delivery...Traditional hot rod

    There's a plate of aluminum epoxied into the back before the styrene finish detail was added, and a strip of brass sheet is epoxied around the exterior of the window area to give it structure as well.
  7. sorry....double post

    The pics wouldn't appear in this post
  8. I seem to be in a bit of a rut doing mostly Sedan Deliveries this winter. I've just completed this hot rod project using a Speccast '34 Sedan Delivery body that only had a rear door opening coin bank. The doors and hood areas were cut away using my rotary tool and ' two-door' doors from a derelict '33 diecast sedan were shortened to fit (sedan delivery doors were 'four-door style) as well as its hood/grille area. new hinges were made for the rear door and the window area cut out with the rotary tool. The 283 fuel injected small block engine was modified (finned valve covers and handmade air cleaner) from Revell's Black-Widow kit and detailed with fuel lines/vacuum lines as well as the usual plug wires and cooling plumbing. The complete interior (seats, door panels, floor, cargo area) was scratchbuilt from styrene and fine plated wire, etc.), and the underside modified and opened up (to fit an engine), coin-bank filled in, and the whole chassis finished with a later model rear axle and handmade aluminum leaf springs/shackles, radius rods, etc. The painted 'chrome reverse' wheels are from Pegasus with the front ones narrowed slightly and fitted with larger rear tires as well as the standard Pegasus ones in front. The small ford caps are from the Revell/ Monogram Deuce Roadster kit. Paint is custom mixed basecoat and a fine orange pinstripe added before the two-part clearcoat, and the simulated carpeting is felt. My two Sedan Delivery projects this winter
  9. These two 1/18 resin models traveled from one end of Canada to the other before finally arriving in Ottawa. I'd bought them in plenty of time to have them for Xmas, but due to lots of post office blunders in both Germany as well as Canada, they finally showed up yesterday.They're both beautifully proportioned and finished, but the real surprise was how attractive the Studebaker's color looks compared to the color shown on the web sites. Judging by American Excellence's as well as Car Model World's pictures I expected the Studebaker's 'Rose Mist' color to be less than ideal, but the real thing is stunning.
  10. Motormax 1960 Ranchero mods.

    Hi Geno, Those Rancheros are so nicely proportioned and you've done a gorgeous job on yours. Just a quick hint: when photographing metalic finishes, try taking the pics on an overcast day....the paint will look a lot more natural. Actually, overcast days make the details show up nicely since there is less hi-contrast. Have a great Xmas my friend Cliffo
  11. I really like microcars (my brother and I have restored a few over the years) and when Schuco introduced a 1/18 Isocarro pickup I was so disappointed that they'd copied an example that used a kluged pickup box instead of the original sheet-metal version. I took a chance that the box could be removed (it could, luckily) and I then made a facsimile of the original box using sheet styrene. I'll now be pleased to see a more accurate model of the Isocarro under the Xmas tree this year. The original Schuco version with the inaccurate wooden box An example of a restored Isocarro with the stamped sheetmetal box sides
  12. Four enjoyable builds this year

    Four seems to be my standard number every year. These builds were all lots of fun and the modeling makes me actually look forward to winter season. Wishing you all a Merry Xmas and a Happy 2018 Cheers, Cliff
  13. This mid '70s HINO HE 345 tractor/trailer combination was modified from a 1/32 Aoshima kit of a later Hino He version (from 1980 on, they had, what I consider, a less attractive set-back front axle and different fender/step shape, different diesel air intake, side safety rails, grille surround shape, etc., etc.) A lot of the changed details were scratchbuilt (using brochure and internet reference). One frustration that I found was that no two factory pics or actual examples ever showed exactly the same details or options. Strangely, after all the effort Aoshima went to in detailing the chassis and the EF100 V8 diesel motor, they made no provision for tilting the cab. The lift-off cab's original underside detail was simply the under-molding of the seats, etc. I fabricated the undercab detail from sheet styrene, the step detail from soldered wire, the front wheel splash/mud guards from styrene, and the tilting mechanism was formed from sheet brass for durability. I also wound up fabricating my own front axle from brass to correct the sloppy, molded styrene kingpin negative camber. The grab handles and mirror brackets were formed from wire (through drilled holes) for durability. The trailer and container were built just as Aoshima suggested with my only effort there in the painting as well as the trailer's simulated air and electrical connections.
  14. The inspiration for this factory stock ’57 Chevy 150 Sedan delivery came from a toy 1/24 ‘West Coast Choppers’ 2-door wagon. There were some reasonable body parts on the toy but the fender openings were oversize, the grille was dis-proportionate, and the chassis was strictly a low-rider. There were two additional donor cars involved in my sedan delivery build….the Revell ‘57 Chevy 150 ‘Black Widow’ kit as well as a Unique Miniatures ‘57 Chevy Nomad coin-bank toy. Sedan Deliveries were part of the basic 150 series, intended as work-horses, and the vast majority of stock ’57 Chev SDs came from the factory with six cylinder motors and three speed standard transmissions. They were based on the 2-door wagon body but without the rear side windows and with a simple, slightly raised flat cargo floor. Seats were non-sporty simple buckets with the driver’s back rest hinged to fold forward for cargo access and the entire rigid passenger seat hinging forward from front hinges. The unique Replicas Nomad coin bank supplied the entire front clip (fenders and hood) as well as a section of rear fender opening detail. I also wound up modifying the coin-bank chassis for accuracy…..completing the spare tire receptacle, adding a hand-made (Renshape modeling resin) wagon style fuel tank, as well as a completely scratchbuilt parking brake detail. The rear axle came from the Revell ‘Black Widow’ kit, and the exhaust is aluminum tubing. Following lots of research, the interior structure for my model was entirely fabricated from sheet styrene, including the spare tire access towards the rear and the headliner. The stock-style folding seats were hand fabricated using Renshape. I made my own tight-swing door hinges to replace the original dog-leg hinges on the wagon toy In the engine compartment, the 235” six- cylinder block came from the WC Choppers wagon toy to which I added a stock style air filter, fuel and vacuum lines, heater lines, and to the engine hood, I added hood-hinge/spring detail, etc. I used slightly larger wheels (parts bin) and the Revell ‘Black Widow’ tires, and had to enlarge the rather undersize stock Revell dog-dish hubcaps. The photo-etch grille mesh and Chevrolet nameplates are all from Model Car Garage and the stock upholstery pattern is from Scale Motorsports. The paint is basecoat/clearcoat depicting factory available Tropical Turquoise. Since all non-undercoated ’57 Chevies used red oxide as the underside color, I chose that instead of body color or black.