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Toner283

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About Toner283

  • Rank
    MCM Ohana
  • Birthday 05/24/1977

Previous Fields

  • Scale I Build
    1/24-25

Profile Information

  • Location
    Arthur, Ontario, Canada
  • Full Name
    Chris Tone

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  1. I know the owner of Perrys Resin and even I wouldn't do business with him unless I actually had the product in my hand. Decent guy but terrible businessman. I know he has taken $$ and delivered no product for a lot of guys here and on other boards. Do a couple of searches and you will easily see what kind of a reputation he has gathered. And it's really too bad because his quality was excellent and he had some stuff no one else had.
  2. I agree with Scott. Don't sell or give away your stuff just yet. Pack it up, step back and enjoy something else for a while and I think you'll find the bug will bite again. And if it does you'll be glad you still have all of your tools and kits. I know plenty of people that have sold or given away all their stuff and then regretted it later. I was getting frustrated with some of the detail builds and the stuff that was half scratch built, custom modifications and such so I went and built a few of the classic Monogram kits straight out of the box. Never destined for a contest or to be shown off, I just built them for me. I find found myself enjoying building again. And a lot of those old kits look great on the shelf when built with solid modelling skills. Cleaning up mold lines, fitting parts properly etc. I even built a couple to match the box art that grabbed my attention when I was a kid. They'll never win any awards, but they look good on the shelf and I like them.
  3. If you have an AMT Ertl 57 Chrysler the battery in it is very nice.
  4. Drag City Castings has a resin Fordor sedan body and a roadster pickup/bed combo cast that are extremely nicely done. Along with a couple of different chopped 3/5 window bodies. All direct fit for the Revell Deuce series of kits. Ed is one of the best casters in the business. I have a bunch of stuff from him and will buy a bunch more when funds allow.
  5. If they have one of those return postage guaranteed envelopes in the junk mail that you can mail to them for more information, you can get a little of your own back. Stuff the envelope full of whatever you can find making it as heavy as you possibly can even to the point of having to tape the envelope shut and then take it to the post office. Costs them money and gets you a little giggle. 😁 Just make sure there's no personal information in it that they could use to trace it back to you.
  6. Didn't get these today but just got my display case put back together this weekend. We moved into our new house almost three years ago and the case has been apart and all the cars have been boxed up since a couple of months before we moved. Lack of time energy and motivation were the biggest reasons they stayed boxed. Mostly Franklin Mint and Danbury Mint with a few Hot Wheels 100% And a row of West Coast Precision diecast 59 Chevy El Caminos and Sedan deliveries. There is also a few Promos in there for a good mix. The whole works is secured to the wall so that it cannot go anywhere and the bottom case is kept locked because I have two very curious toddlers who are very interested in Daddy's cars. That is also why the bottom cabinet is zip tied shut.
  7. I should add to my above statement that what were minor assembly irritations for me may be major assembly frustrations for someone else. (I'm no smarter than anybody else, I have just spent lots of time dealing with poorly manufactured stuff) I have spent quite a few years working with and installing automotive aftermarket parts. Stuff where "bolt-on" never does without being re-engineered and Universal fit just means not designed to properly fit any vehicle yet manufactured. Having to finesse stuff to make it fit is just an accepted fact of life. ?‍♂️
  8. I don't have one exactly the same as that but I did get the little speedster from Speedway Motors. Looks a bit like a Model A Roadster. I bought mine pre-painted as we were on a deadline for our wedding and my little guy needed something to ride down the aisle in because he couldn't walk yet. My observations on the kit that I bought were: Take all of the hardware (nuts bolts washers) that came with the kit, save yourself the aggravation and pitch them. They are twist and toss offshore garbage. You just about get them tight and they either strip or they skip. That and the cheapy Chrome that was on the ones that came with the kit - after the car sat outside overnight after the wedding were rusty already in the morning. Hate to see what they look like after they've been the summer outside. Replace them with good quality mild steel bolts or if the pedal cars going to get played with a lot and be outside a lot, replace them with stainless. Minimal cost for the number of bolts and nuts etc that you need to buy. The ones on my son's pedal car are getting replaced now that the wedding is over with. As an added bonus, quality stainless Hardware can be polished to a pretty nice shine. Don't expect any two holes to line up while assembling the pieces. If they do it's a bonus. Several of the parts that I had the holes were not a big enough diameter for the provided nuts and bolts to go through. In addition to this, most of the holes were not round, off center, or both. A couple of the pieces, the hole pitch was off causing me to have to re-drill 1/2 a hole to get things to line up. Other than those minor assembly irritations, the car looked really cool at the wedding and was a big hit with both people taking pictures and other kids taking it for a ride after the ceremony. I can't wait for my little guy to get big enough to be actually be able to pedal it. My biggest advice if you were buying an unpainted one, would be to totally assemble it and make sure everything fits properly and runs smooth then blow it apart to paint it. That would save any nasty surprises and having to drill holes in the freshly painted body.? I've been there and it's no fun. ???
  9. As an additional tip, I know you are wanting to Pro Street yours but for a stock/mildly modified car there is a better chassis available than the original one from the 69 Chevelle. The AMT 69 Olds W30 chassis is a direct drop in fit. Basically no modifications and it will go under the 69 Chevelle and give you a far better modern tooled chassis. Probably the 69 Hurst Olds will also work but I have never had one of those to be able to verify it.
  10. Don't use the search feature on the site. It's basically useless. Check out this thread that Ace Garage Guy posted and use the tips in it. Much better search results.
  11. The old monogram 40 Ford truck kit has a chrome fire extinguisher in it. It also has some Chrome tools and a first aid kit as well.
  12. Opening everything, poor/sloppy hinges, poor door to body fit and generally fiddly to build. Designed and tooled along the same lines as their 55 56 and 57 Chevy opening everything kits. A nice model can be built of it with a bunch of work but it can be very frustrating for a young or an inexperienced builder. Definitely not a shake the box and have a completed model fall out type of kit.
  13. A drop or two of clear paint works good as well for attaching PE emblems to the outer body of a model car or truck. Basically just enough to "glue" the emblem down.
  14. The "vents" on a 67 Chevelle SS hood are there for looks only, there are no actual holes through the hood. The only thing on the bottom of the hood is where the studs come through that the stamped steel nuts thread onto to hold the "vents" in place. They are slightly curved to match the curve of the power bulges or blisters in the hood. (depends on who you ask what they are called) FWIW, the vents on 66 and 67 SS Chevelles are phony and the 68 and 69 SS Chevelles are functional. On all of them the Super Sport hoods have the power bulges and the base model hoods are flat. This is first hand knowledge as my father has owned a 67 Chevelle since 68 (and still has it) and I have a 69 Chevelle.
  15. Thanks! I also spent several years professionally building hot rods and modified cars. Getting paid to work on other people's six and seven-figure cars was a lot of fun but I found that I got burnt out and as a result, I wasn't working on my own projects. The last thing I wanted to do when I got home was go out and work on my own cars after having worked on cars all day. Took a bit of time after I left the shop I worked at, but I've got my fire reignited to work on my own projects now and I'm slowly getting work accomplished on them again as time and money allows. With three young kids at home time can be the most difficult commodity to come across. Here is a couple of my toys.
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