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kenlwest

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About kenlwest

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    MCM Regular

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  • Location
    Lake Orion, Michigan
  • Full Name
    Ken West

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  1. This reminds me a lot of the 66 Coronet RT convertible I had in the mid 70's. Similar color, but black interior. My dad sold it for 500 dollars after I enlisted in the Army. The car is worth a fortune today! Oh well, thanks for the memories Michelle!
  2. I redesigned the heads with an additional 4 degree front view angle, and remodeled the intake manifold. Here are some before and after pictures.
  3. I found some very good photos of the correct bellhousing for 1972. I finished modeling it this afternoon and printed it. Also, I attached a picture of what I used for reference.
  4. Nice! I always liked the silver anniversaries.
  5. Yes. The process of creating an accurate model involves many design iterations. The order in which the parts are designed will minimize the number trials.
  6. I assembled the parts together. Just for fun, I placed the valve covers from the 78 kit on the heads. I noticed 2 issues right away that will need to be corrected before the final print. The intake is too shallow, and the heads need to be angled more in the front view. More to come..
  7. There are many variations of 350 Chevy intake manifolds that were used over many years. I modeled mine after the spread bore manifold that was used in model years 72 and 73. Here you can see both the printed part, and the intake/carb part that came in the 78 kit.
  8. I printed out the heads this morning. I temporarily mounted them on the block - I couldn't help myself. Notice the spark plug holes... the plug wires will be attached to boots and plugs, to be printed later in the process. Next: intake manifold. Stay tuned.
  9. I started working on the engine. Just pulled this off the printer. I got a little carried away with details that won't be seen after the engine is assembled, but it will provide a preview of where the project is going. You can see the comparison between the monogram engine and the detailed block.
  10. The printing method used for the trial is called FDM. It is an inexpensive way to make quick prototypes and fitting trials. The final prints will be using a process called SLA or FDM. But that is ways down the road. Many trials will have to be made along the way. Here is the hood, fitted to the opening. Next, the structural cage..
  11. Hello to all. I have been a lurking member for a few years, and I enjoy looking at the many fantastic models that are showcased here. I thought it was time to share a project with you for a change. I recently purchased a Monogram 1/8 Corvette, and I know most of you are familiar with the Monogram 1/8 Scale subjects. I have had a couple of real Corvettes over the years, and the C3 is my favorite. I decided to design and build a 72 Corvette, and use the 78 as a basis for it, and 3d print the parts for it. Although they may appear very similar, there are significant differences between the 72 and 78. In addition, I will try and correct some of the inaccuracies that are present in the 78 body shape as the project progresses. What you see here will not be used in the model. It is what I call a "Surface and Highlight" test print. This will be used to analyze the reflections, shapes, and scale. Next step will be to incorporate the slight changes into the computer model. This project will take a few months to complete. I hope you enjoy the journey, and PLEASE. comment as appropriate for anything you feel needs to be pointed out!
  12. Awesome! I owned a 66 Coronet RT convertible (maroon) back in the early 70's. Torqueflite tranny quit and my Dad got tired of seeing it parked in the barn, so he sold it for $125.00. I was only 17 back then, but I still knew that somebody got way more than they paid for. I would give ANYTHING to get that car back! Anyway, thanks for the memories!
  13. Are your parts printed from ABS or PLA? I print with PLA, then use superglue for assembly. I use oil-based kilz primer (several coats) to fill in the layer grooves, then sand the parts. Works great. I can tell by the way you explain splitting your parts and using a dremel to remove support, and your points about fiddling with the printer, and printing larger scales, tells me that you have been experimenting with this for awhile. One of these days I'll post some of my printed models. I specialize in Brass-Era cars, and I have several; all done in 1:12 scale. I have hesitated to show them on this forum, since most members are polystyrene builders. I should also add that I am in complete AWE of the scratchbuilding and detailing that goes on here! Stunning! If some of these scratchbuilders ever get a handle on CAD and 3d printing, no telling to what heights they may take us. Mike is what I would call an electronic scratchbuilder. Amazing stuff!!
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