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DustyMojave

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About DustyMojave

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  • Scale I Build
    1/24-1/25

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  • Location
    Mojave Desert...SoCal
  • Full Name
    Richard Parcells

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  1. I have no thoughts of moving the rear axle back. I would shorten the tail of the bodywork.
  2. I'm a little confused what you're saying Harry. These are the Firebirds raced by TG racing in 1969. 1st at Wolverine, then at Riverside: I see none of what you refer to here: " a google search will show pictures of the rearward facing pair of scoops". But the Jon Ward built 68 Camaro/Firebird raced at Daytona in early 69 did have rearward facing "scoops" that were fairings over the lights for the side numbers. Yes, you have the terminology correct as to "Trans Am" and "Trans-Am". I am WELL aware that there was NO "Pontiac Trans Am" model in the 1968 model year. The 1st Firebird Trans Am I ever saw was at Riverside Raceway and was driven by Jerry Titus. It was NOT a race car, but I believed at the time that it was a pre-production prototype for marketing purposes. I knew Jerry in those days, having grown up involved in Cal Club sports car racing, and knowing a number of other staff members of Sports Car Graphic magazine, such as Jean Calvin, Denise McCluggage and ... oh what's his name with the mustache... Jerry lived not far away in the San Fernando Valley then. Jerry's son Rick was a co-crew member with me on Ron Dykes' Tiger that was garaged in my home for the '68 season. Rick Titus, Spike Krick, me and the crew chief, my dad, Jack Parcells were the crew for that. Jerry was a driving teacher in Shelby's driving school, and also taught in the Cal Club/SCCA driving school sessions where I worked as an official as well. He was a guy I encountered many times a year in those days. Maybe you can post a picture with the scoops you are referring to circled?
  3. "On my work table right now, I already have 6 Cobras, 2 Cougar IIs, a GT350R, a Toyota Celica Turbo Group 5 and a Toyota Celica Coupe racer. So I'm not in a real hurry to start another project right now. But the T-Bird would fit right in with the Cobra group. I have a Tiger kit to build too. Another Shelby project, and I was on the crew of a famous one of those in full scale back in the 60s. Then I have a 68 GT500 that will get chassis, front inner fenders, etc. from a 67 kit. Then another 67GT350 to build like a full scale 67 GT350 that I was on the crew of many years ago. So I have plenty of such projects lined up over here. And that's not counting the dry lakes cars, sprint cars, midgets, hot rods or off road racers. " I think they're cool. I had intended to post up about a couple of them on another site...Had started a thread on another build, a 69 Barracuda phantom A/Sedan...But... I'd rather NOT air someone else's dirty laundry on this site. Race cars are fun and exciting, but skidmarks are not pleasant to see, especially someone else's.
  4. Over a decade ago, Jairus Watson wrote this thread in SlotBlog forums about building a static model of a rail frame post war midget using the Monogram Kurtis-Offy. But In his thread, he refers to another article in a Rod & Custom Models magazine from June of '64 about building a V8 offset sprint car by Joe Henning. http://slotblog.net/topic/11995-1947-midget/ This is a 1952 Kurtis "Big Car" aka "Champ Car" (so named because they were used in competition for the AAA (later USAC) National Championship Series. This is another 1952 Kurtis Big Car: This is a Kurtis Champ car This is a Kurtis-Offy midget, as in the one modeled by Monogram. Note the proportional differences. A midget typically has a wheelbase of about 6'. 70-72". A sprint car wheelbase is about 85-95". A Big Car, or as they are known in the more modern USAC series "Silver Crown" car has a wheelbase of 99"+. Note that Joe Henning used a wheelbase of 85", which is a real short sprint car, typical of those built to be used on short tracks of 3/8 mile or less. Most sprint car racing takes place on 1/2 mile dirt or paved oval tracks. So 95" is more typical for a sprint car. I'm curious what the wheelbase scales out to with the converted Monogram midget kit here. I believe it was stretched, but how much and how are not discussed in this thread. I DO want to make sure that in no way am I ever saying anything is "wrong" with this model. There's a million ways to skin a cat or build a sprint car. This is one of them. I'm just providing more relevant information on the subject.
  5. Very nice job on the fuel filler neck and cap! OTOH, most such cars when used for short track racing, as this car appears to represent (in spite of your title on the thread that refers to it as a "big car", which is a long wheel base car used for long tracks such as 1 mile dirt ovals and paved ovals of 1 mile or more per lap) have the fuel filler under the snap down leather at the very top of the headrest fairing. To fuel up a Sprint car or a midget, one unsnaps the leather skirt at the top to find a round hole with the cap inside the bodywork.
  6. I'm not aware of any "vents" below the A Pillars. I DO see sheet aluminum fairings over the pair of license plate lamps used to light the number for night racing so the pit crew and the Timers and Scorers can keep track of who is in what place in the race.
  7. I've never run across these 1/43 AMT kits at all. I do have a Monogram Cobra 289. I also have a couple of Testors with die cast bodies, a 40 Willys and a Corvette GS. Those might be a source of wheeels and other parts for you. I haven't looked them up on evilbay lately to know availability or typical price though.
  8. On my work table right now, I already have 6 Cobras, 2 Cougar IIs, a GT350R, a Toyota Celica Turbo Group 5 and a Toyota Celica Coupe racer. So I'm not in a real hurry to start another project right now. But the T-Bird would fit right in with the Cobra group. I have a Tiger kit to build too. Another Shelby project, and I was on the crew of a famous one of those in full scale back in the 60s. Then I have a 68 GT500 that will get chassis, front inner fenders, etc. from a 67 kit. Then another 67GT350 to build like a full scale 67 GT350 that I was on the crew of many years ago. So I have plenty of such projects lined up over here. And that's not counting the dry lakes cars, sprint cars, midgets, hot rods or off road racers. I had hand written out those notes above back in the late 1960s. I found the paper a few years ago and transcribed it to the computer. I even had lined out that one suspension idea and copied that in the Word document. I even saw the thing back in the 60s with a paint scheme of either blue with white stripes as shown in that drawing you show, or white with blue stripes. I think my concept would wind up looking a great deal like a Sunbeam Tiger. And maybe that was inspiration for the Sunbeam body (originally the Sunbeam Alpine) design came from. The Tiger I crewed for was fast. Beat Corvettes and even Cobras in it's day. But it didn't handle as well as a Cobra due to the engine being mounted much further forward between the front wheels, so it pushed in corners, unlike the better balanced Cobra. Compare this Tiger I crewed on with a T-Bird:
  9. You see my avatar. That's my Hi Jumper race buggy I built back in the 70s and raced to a championship. At its1st race, near Barstow, California, in the 115° heat, there was a wedding ceremony at the start line just before the 1st racer got the green flag.Scott Gilliland married Louise Van Trease. And immediately after kissing, the bride and groom both put on their race helmets and got into Louise's Bill Stroppe built Edsel to start the race. VERY MUCH like this one and perhaps the one in the magazine article. There were actually a few Edsels built for offroad racing by various people. I even saw the picked over bones of one down along a race course in Baja once. Not much left but the main body shell, frame and roll cage slowly rusting away in the desert. And that was many decades ago. Very good job on this. From a long time offroad racer.
  10. I've imagined something like this since the mid 1960s. I have long bemoaned the direction Ford took the T-Bird. I have a file in my computer with a list of similar projects. SCCA used to call their most radical racers "Modifieds". The concept came from the 1950s when the most radical racers might be found on the street in between races. And many of them were built with parts from daily driver cars. So they were in many ways "Modified". Like an MG with a Chevy V8. Or a 52 Plymouth frame with a Dodge Hemi engine and a fiberglass sports car body (I worked on one of those a while back). Or Max Balchowski's O'l Yallers built with a variety of junk yard parts. By the mid 60s, race cars in the Modified class were full on purpose built race cars with only the basic engine from a daily driver car. Lolas, McLarens, Coopers, Chaparrals, etc. So the class for the most radical cars became "Sports Racer". And "Modified" went away. At the same time, there was then no real class for cars like GS Vettes. Because a GS Vette was no competition for a Cooper Cobra, even if it DID have nearly 100ci bigger engine (377ci GS Vette vs 289ci Cooper Cobra). Here's my T-Bird Concept: Thunderbird Phantom Sports Car What if Ford decided to divert the T-Bird towards more of a smaller true sports car, instead of growing into a personal luxury car? Potential Modifications: Wheelbase under 100” Same width V8 Engine moved back Standard 312 V8 engine with early T-bird hood scoop 427 Version with more bulged front and rear fenders and teardrop hood scoop Perimeter frame based on early T-Bird Maybe Unit body? Shorter tail, more like Cobra, still with trunk Wing at rear mounted to rear fender fins or to trunk lid, but extending to fins Front fender side engine compartment outlet vents Rear axle moved forward to right behind the seats IRS with 9” center Rear hub on unequal length radius arms with trailing lower link from frame under seat and leading upper link to end of frame rail. Rear Semi-Trailing Arm with hub on end of arm With 2 pivots. Near driveshaft and outboard. Double A-Arm suspension front with Coilover shock mounted to lower arm. Armstrong Coilover shock units Front clip looks like 55-57 T-Bird. Grille opening, less grille - preferably 55-56 - minus the massive bumper of the 57 Rear Clip similar to early T-Bird, but shorter Bumperettes instead of big chrome bumpers -- OR -- bumper-free Roll bar Removable hardtop in 3 versions: short top like regular 55-57 top Fastback hatchback top Double headrest rear deck I have a T-Bird kit and some Cobra parts set aside, but it's never been built. So the artist, you and me have all had much the same idea.
  11. A neighbor up the block from me shortly after I bought my '61 F100 bought a '62 long bed Custom Cab Integral Cab. '62 version of my '61. I bought the aftermarket side saddle auxiliary gas tanks from it and put them in mine. His had a grille different from all of those shown, but most like the '63 shown in the "Quick Guide" above. IIRC, small rectangles instead of the long bars. My long time best friend had a 63 Short Bed Styleside (like the green one shown above with the 57-60 style bed). It had the same grille as the '63 shown in the guide. But painted white with black accents instead of chrome. After some fool ran a red light and he rammed the side of the car, he replaced the whole front clip with pieces from a '64 Custom Cab. That grille was aluminum with the recessed areas painted black.. I've seen photos of the '62 grille shown in the guide with the slender horizontal bar, but I've never encountered one in person. Maybe Ford was still doing with pickup grilles what they did with sedan grilles in the late 30s. Differences in the grille to signify different sub models. It was quite common in Detroit in the 60s. I used to have a neighbor around the corner who had a '67 Dodge Coronet with mis-matched grille halves. Both halves were '67 Coronet, but different sub models.
  12. Ain't it interesting and fun to find a picture of an LA area racer, in a San Fernando Valley built car, sponsored by a San Fernando Valley business, racing 2,100 miles away in Milwaukee Wisconsin? I have a vague memory of meeting Sam Hanks when I was a little kid in the company of my dad. IIRC, it was at an event for other than circle track racing. I think at a sports car race. Sam and my dad were old acquaintances/friends from racing midgets and such back in the day. As I said in the build thread, I love this model. It came out great and the graphics, in particular are impressive.
  13. Nice. I'm Xtra fond of these trucks. I bought my '61 F100 long bed Custom Cab in 1976. A couple years later I replaced the original 292 with a mighty 390 with a cam, Edelbrock manifold, Carter AFB carb, long tube headers and US Mag slots. Nearly 400,000 miles later, the 390 got replaced with a 428 Cobra Jet. Repainted in original color. Note that in the AMT 1962 F100 kit, and for that replacement grille you got, they used a 1961 grille. In spite of the 1962 license plates on the bumpers. The real 62 grille looks a lot like a 63 grille without the 2 heavy bars of the '61, but with a more complex grille.
  14. Yeah, I get what you're saying. I was NOT saying that you should take your model apart and "FIX" the issue. Just pointing it out for you and others who may be wanting to build an even MORE accurate model in the future.
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