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jaxenro

What grit do you sand primer to before applying color coats?

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Think the title says it all - i am using dupli-color perfect match scratch filler primer and a little putty and sanding it smooth but:

What grit do you sand primer to before applying color coats?

I am starting at 320 for the putty and primer but what should I take it down to?

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For sanding primer before applying color coats, I usually go over the primer lightly with 600 or 1000 grit and it seems to work just fine.

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If the primer's reasonably smooth, sometimes I don't sand it at all.

When I do sand primer, I use #800 (wet) or a well-worn piece of #600.

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I just lick mine.

Sure my paintjobs tend to be crappy. But it tastes sooooooo good.

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Just don't do the "wet coat" after a grape Popsicle ...

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1000 grit wet/dry or 1500 grit MicroMesh pad. This is Wet Sanded. Need just enough "tooth" for the base coat to better adhere.

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Guest

I just lick mine.

Sure my paintjobs tend to be crappy. But it tastes sooooooo good.

πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚that's pretty good!

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I think you'll be fine with 800-1000 grit ( wet or dry, wet being the better alternative πŸ˜‰) The issue, BEFORE, you start/add colour coats, would be to seal your final primer coats, after sanding ) From experience, putties, any type really, tend to shrink over time & in some cases become visible through the colour coats, especially true for "ghosting"... Areas where mold lines or emblems etc have been sanded off. Sealing will ensure that none of these problems will become visible through your colour coats, especially if you're using any type of automotive paints ( Duplicolor etc ) Hope this helps πŸ‘πŸ½

Edited by Hemified71

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Is that what's meant by a wet coat?

Wet coat? If questioning wet vs dry sanding, it's just what it says. Wet sanding is done with water. Keeping the sandpaper and/or the model wet when sanding. Finer grits work better wet.

Scott

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Personally, I have used 6000-grit polishing cloth from Micromesh for as long as those polishing kits have been in circulation. As I tend to use lacquer primers, this gives me a satin-finish surface, which is, in scale, about as close as I would come to a wet-sanded primer surface on a real car body.

Seldom have I ever had paint, either lacquer or even Testor's/Model Master enamels, thinned for airbrushing with lacquer thinner fail to adhere to such a surface-and in the bargain, I get a far smoother, thinner finish straight from the airbrush, requiring a lot less polishing to get a shine.

Art

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I think you'll be fine with 800-1000 grit ( wet or dry, wet being the better alternative ) The issue, BEFORE, you start/add colour coats, would be to seal your final primer coats, after sanding ) From experience, putties, any type really, tend to shrink over time & in some cases become visible through the colour coats, especially true for "ghosting"... Areas where mold lines or emblems etc have been sanded off. Sealing will ensure that none of these problems will become visible through your colour coats, especially if you're using any type of automotive paints ( Duplicolor etc ) Hope this helps

What do you seal it with?

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3200 Micro Mesh sanding cloth wet, works perfect.

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What do you seal it with?

Zero Paints ( UK ) sell a great sealer or try your local Auto Paint supply/parts store for some sealer or etch primer... πŸ˜‰πŸ‘πŸ½

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If you use an etch primer test it on something first. Some other them have some pretty rowdy solvents is them.

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