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Every new build I try to stretch my skills and add more detail. I just put a oil pan drain plug on a Ford V6 and started considering putting on starter and alternator wiring.

Can too much detail go too far over the top and detract from the build?

Do you draw a line on where to stop or is there a line for you ? 

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Every new build I try to stretch my skills and add more detail. I just put a oil pan drain plug on a Ford V6 and started considering putting on starter and alternator wiring.

Can too much detail go too far over the top and detract from the build?

Do you draw a line on where to stop or is there a line for you ? 

I don't think it can detract from the view unless it's poorly done... if it keeps all the new wiring relatively similar to actual wiring, then in my opinion, it can only enhance the model. However, the problem I have with so much of this detailing is NEVER seen by anyone, including the builder who could easily display the model with the hood down. I have found for myself, that even engine wiring is too much work IF I intend to display the model with a closed hood... and that has been the case 100% of the time since I display in an enclosed acrylic cabinet, and open hoods could actually wind up striking the shelf above it, and regardless of that, how many folks are going to look that closely so that they actually can determine what you've done? Now, if you're building for a contest, that's another story, one which I defer to others who've actually done so...

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I'd have to agree with Frank that only if you're building for a contest would I get really carried away with detail wiring. But, even more, if it makes you happy then by all means have a blast filling that engine compartment. I tend to just do plug and fuel lines on my display models that will only be seen by few. My most detailed was the engine of a Porsche 944 that had me converting it back from a turbo to normally aspirated as the car was in my garage at the time. I did overdo it but still just put wires in that filled some empty space and I thought added to the look. I had just come back to the hobby so figured the practice would be good. I'm putting a photo here and I hope this helps you in deciding how far to go.

engineDSC_8515.jpg

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As badly as I want to make my models look like that porsche above (great job btw) I get dis-interested in building when I try to go to that detail. Takes too long and is way too small/detailed for me to try to even mess with. I'm basically the kind of person that will flip the desk over in anger when I lose a tiny piece

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For engine detailing, the only details that I haven't attempted yet are carburetor linkages (those PE parts are just too darn tiny for me), and secondary electrical wiring (I think it would make the engine compartments look too busy and/or cluttered).  Maybe some day when I get really adventurous...  For chassis's, I haven't yet tried doing emergency brake lines.

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I agree with Foxer, if its what you want to do go for it.  The only thing I would caution you on is making sure the wire sizes are scale accurate.  I've seen some plug wires that look like water hoses on models.  I think if you keep your wires scale accurate it won't look too busy.  Have fun!

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The amount of detail depends on how much time and effort you want to spend on that part of the model.  I have always found it to be a very interesting, if not somewhat frustrating at times, part of the build.

In doing my detailing, I try to be as accurate as I can and try to stay dimensionally true as well.  It is alright to sometimes size exaggerate something for emphasis.

Another thing to consider is technique.  On a modern engine and engine bay, you can detail with judicious use of paint.  In other cases, you may want to go the whole route with linkages, fuel lines, wiring, etc.  One obvious thing to address on many kits is the "sky hook" alternator or generator.  I have seen many wired kits and detailed engine bays where the alternator is hanging in space with no brackets.

 

 

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Every new build I try to stretch my skills and add more detail. I just put a oil pan drain plug on a Ford V6 and started considering putting on starter and alternator wiring.

Can too much detail go too far over the top and detract from the build?

Do you draw a line on where to stop or is there a line for you ? 

A model car is just an illusion of the real thing.
Adding ALL the wires and plumbing needed to make it work doesn't make it an actual car.  So... all that's needed to make the illusion convincing is to put enough detail to convince the eye that it's all there.  And a modicum of realistic weathering will cover up a ton of details left out anyway.

 

In some instances only a hint that the details are present is enough to convince.
Details like plug wires are only needed if they are visible on a real engine.  But things like Generator/Alternator wires are not necessary unless they are on top and in plain view.
Many times one can fake the illusion by bundling wires and simply running them around the engine compartment in a realistic way with-out taking the time to match up color. 

Concentrate on what is clearly visible and forget the harder to see oil pressure sending unit wire. Because nobody will see it anyway.

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About the most detail I go to anymore is plug wires, heater hoses  and battery cables. Anything more than that  I tend to get dis-interested in the whole build

Besides ,,,,,,outside of any pictures I post of the build online ( IF I do even that ) . No one is going to see it but me ,,

Although I do like and can appreciate the level of detail   some go to make them look real .

But,,,,,, the funny part is, the older I get the less desire I have to do any extreme detailing .

I started out doing mostly box stock builds and I think I've come full circle back to just that

Edited by gtx6970

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I usually stop somewhere around plug wires, battery cables, and heater hoses. Btw. The heater hoses are pretty easy and really make the engine look plumbed. Anyway that's me. More importantly, if you enjoy adding all the minute details by all means go for it.

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i never realized Porsche had a front engine car; don't i feel dumb.

The 911 always got top billing, but back in the '80's Porsche did a few front engines that were somewhat prevented from outshining the 911, especially in the handling department. The 924 and 944 had exceptional handling but always wanted more horsepower. The 928 was the first car Porsche ever did that was designed with a clean sheet of paper.

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i never realized Porsche had a front engine car; don't i feel dumb.

More than one, I'd show some pictures but that ain't workin' for me right now. :wacko:

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Here are a few engine details I've done.  But, as stated, it depends on what you want to do and what interests.  One friend of mine would only modify the body to what he wanted, then do the primer and that was it.  It was some time before he went through a full finish of the model.

100_0049_zps4c2b857c.jpg~original

100_0077_zps4fba88c3.jpg~original

100_1140_zpsdc38ed02.jpg~original

 

 

 

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I think detailing is a preference that can be extended from build to build.  Like Jon said in the beginning, every build trying to add a bit more detail.  That's the way I see it too.  1st time around with plug wires.  Next time with some fuel lines, and so forth.  The comfort zone can be stretched occasionally, I think it's all piece by piece.  I don't like plug wires that are way out of scale either.  I like 1:25, and things are not big in this scale.

I draw the line when it comes to replicating every bolt that is on an engine or rear end, or every rivet that joins some kind of sheet metal, enough is enough.  I recently did lug nuts on mag wheels, I like the result and I'll do it again only if the rest of the car shows similar detailing.  But half the buggers went flying and I can't find them.  Expensive waste.

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The main thing is to stop when it looks good, it's easy to go too far with the detailing and it'll only look cluttered.

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Thanks for all the replies. Very helpful. I think I will continue on the way I am doing it. I mostly like the challenge. 

I don't care a lot about what others can't see, I know whats there and whats not. I try and keep  to scale and currently trying t come up with a scratch built distributor that doesn't look to large.

Thanks for the input

Jon

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As badly as I want to make my models look like that porsche above (great job btw) I get dis-interested in building when I try to go to that detail. Takes too long and is way too small/detailed for me to try to even mess with. I'm basically the kind of person that will flip the desk over in anger when I lose a tiny piece

.......Reading this made me think I don't remember writing this because this is me as well....... :blink:

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I think one key is if you're going to add a detail, try to get each particular detail scale-correct or don't bother.

Plug wires as big as garden hoses, throttle-return springs and linkages that are way too big, and plumbing that runs off to the wrong place because the builder doesn't understand the function of the detail he's adding...these things only detract from a model.

If you can't get it right, leave it off.B)

 

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I think one key is if you're going to add a detail, try to get each particular detail scale-correct or don't bother.

Plug wires as big as garden hoses, throttle-return springs and linkages that are way too big, and plumbing that runs off to the wrong place because the builder doesn't understand the function of the detail he's adding...these things only detract from a model.

If you can't get it right, leave it off.B)

That's basically where I am with plug wires - I love doing hemis because I can actually see where the wires go! On other cars, I've looked for clues but in every other case, nothing was there to assure me that I was getting the wires in the right place. So, I just decided not to add the wires, but I will do some detail painting on the kit's distributor, and that suffices for me.

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You gotta have the massive throttle return spring! It's for those snap revs! Haha

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