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Impalow

1926 Model T Sedan - SomesortaRod - Finally Done.. Only 2months late!

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An upcoming show on Sept. 27th has a rat-rod theme class... Andy (

Here is the rough mockup:

4D7431A9-D93B-49F4-A17C-D45698D02DF7.jpg

So first thing I needed was a frame, so I drew one up and sent it to the cutter... The cutter scores .020 very well, so i stacked up three layers to make the thickness.

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Once the frame was cut and cleaned, I took it to the drill press to drill out all the speed holes... The cutter scored them so I knew exactly where to drill.

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Added the rear cross member from the 29' Ratrod pickup and tied the front together.

A36B46C2-2DBB-435A-9B0F-9CAE0707D100.jpg

Then programed and cut the center frame support... this is .020 with a .010 accent on top of it.  The cutter will cut clean threw .010

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Once that was in place I created the inner structure, transmission and suspension mounts.

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Last night I drew up and cut the rear links and suspension mounts... the rear end is from the tweedy pie and the spring is from the 29' pickup.

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Tonight's plan is front suspension and engine mounts.

Edited by Impalow

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That's ............................... pretty impressive. Tell us more about this magical cutter.

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Very very nice so far. I like the showcar-esque exaggerated proportions, and the overall lines. The frame comes off immediately as a well thought-out, engineered and finely crafted showcar piece as well.

This is so far beyond the typical "rat rod" that it's kinda a shame to stick it with that label.

If you can keep the stance and immediate impression of your first mockup, you've got a slam-dunk winner.B)

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My wife has a

And, your frame is fantastic! My mind is racing now considering the possibilities with the

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Thanks guys!

That's ............................... pretty impressive. Tell us more about this magical cutter.

My wife has a

And, your frame is fantastic! My mind is racing now considering the possibilities with the

I got the idea from reading this mostly.... http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/79025-a-guide-to-using-the-silhouette-cameo-cutter/

Its an older model... but you get the idea of the possibilities...  I'm finding I can be more creative, and repetitive shapes are much easier... Still requires a lot of hand work to finish, but symmetry is much easier. 

Very very nice so far. I like the showcar-esque exaggerated proportions, and the overall lines. The frame comes off immediately as a well thought-out, engineered and finely crafted showcar piece as well.

This is so far beyond the typical "rat rod" that it's kinda a shame to stick it with that label.

If you can keep the stance and immediate impression of your first mockup, you've got a slam-dunk winner.B)

Thanks Bill!  Part of me is contemplating making 2 bodies... one rusty... one not so rusty.  That way after this show it can be a street rod.  Even as a rot rod, the frame suspension and engine will be "finished" at least.

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Great start.Looks like you guys have your work cut out for you. (pun intended).

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That's a wicked looking frame! Very in keeping with the extreme styling put into some rat rods. Lots of swoop, lots of holes.

One critique on the suspension design...

The single attachment point of the trailing arms at the axle brackets would not work because as you have it now, there would be nothing to control axle rotation under acceleration or braking. As it is now the axle would flap up and down uncontrollably and break the U-joints / drive shaft in the first 100 feet it was driven. The arms either need double attachment points at the axle housing bracket (either vertically or horizontally) or a second pair of upper arms.

That is, if you are concerned about it looking like a prototypical suspension design.

Edited by Dennis Lacy

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That's a wicked looking frame! Very in keeping with the extreme styling put into some rat rods. Lots of swoop, lots of holes.

One critique on the suspension design...

The single attachment point of the trailing arms at the axle brackets would not work because as you have it now, there would be nothing to control axle rotation under acceleration or braking. As it is now the axle would flap up and down uncontrollably and break the U-joints / drive shaft in the first 100 feet it was driven. The arms either need double attachment points at the axle housing bracket (either vertically or horizontally) or a second pair of upper arms.

That is, if you are concerned about it looking like a prototypical suspension design.

completely understand what you are saying here... And I agree... My plan was to use a torque tube style drive shaft, reason one was to keep with a 2 link rear... And reason 2 was the drive shaft will be so high in the passenger compartment, I figure a rotating shaft would be quite unsafe...   In your opinion would that make the situation a little more prototypically correct?  

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completely understand what you are saying here... And I agree... My plan was to use a torque tube style drive shaft, reason one was to keep with a 2 link rear... And reason 2 was the drive shaft will be so high in the passenger compartment, I figure a rotating shaft would be quite unsafe...   In your opinion would that make the situation a little more prototypically correct?  

It's not an ideal situation but, yes, a torque tube would take care of the axle rotation issue. Typically, if using trailing arms with a torque tube they have to be the same length of the tube and the front pivot points of the trailing arms have to be exactly aligned (front/back) with the attachment/pivot point on the back of the transmission or serious binding will happen as all three move up and down and try to swing through different arcs.

The better idea would be to fabricate some new diagonal rear rods that come off of the existing axle brackets and attach at the same point on the torque tube, like Ford's original design. In that design the rods purpose is brace the axle tubes. 

Luckily, we're only building models here and there's some leeway. :)

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Absolutely an outstanding project!This is gonna be killah!!

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You are nutty and I'm glad I know you.. Makes me feel better about being me. Haha.

and where did you get that cutter idea?? Thanks for being the guinny pig

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Thanks guys!!  And Dennis thank you for your input, feedback and help.  

Andy this is all your fault.. This build, this cutter, the 3d printer.., I blame you., haha

Got the front suspension on tonight...This baby is free standing!  Engine mounts up next..

Need to do some trimming on the body to get it low enough... But I set it on and so far so good

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This is looking very creative. I like the cutter. 

I wonder if a cricket would do this? 

Edited by 1930fordpickup

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Very impressive design and fabrication using innovative techniques! Thanks for posting this!

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Veeeery cool so far. Loving what the cutter can do, and the stance/style you've nailed down is wicked.

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Not yet... But a little closer to done! 

Motor mounts  and cross member made and installed.

And now onto the engine... Going with a flathead with a twist.. Using the shaft drive supercharger from the duesie... Wanted to try something a bit more unique. Not quite sure what I'm going to do for the carb/carbs yet... That's tomorrow's adventure. 

 

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Fantastic motor mount cross member. Split radius rods look good, too. Very interesting supercharger setup. Looks like it's cam driven? The air intake plenum on the front of the SC would look neat reshaped a bit with a (left to right) row of two-barrels across it.

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Just keeps getting better. Need to look at one of those cutters. What software did you use to do the frame?

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Looks good so far.  I look forward to seeing this one done.

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Just keeps getting better. Need to look at one of those cutters. What software did you use to do the frame?

Thank you!  I use illustrator, but you could use AutoCad as well.... The software for the cutter lets you import .DXF files.

Fantastic motor mount cross member. Split radius rods look good, too. Very interesting supercharger setup. Looks like it's cam driven? The air intake plenum on the front of the SC would look neat reshaped a bit with a (left to right) row of two-barrels across it.

Thanks Dennis.. yes it is a cam driven Supercharger, and you are reading my mind on the multi-carbs... Still trying to figure that out..

Thanks everyone for the compliments!   I didn't get much done over the weekend, spent most of it organizing my workshop.. All these new toys were eating up a lot of work space.

Yesterday I created the inner body structure, then covered it with some BMF and finally gave it a circular scuff with a ScotchBrite Pad.  My current plan is to have the entire body done in this bare metal look with some washes and weathering here and there.

I added some simulated welds, and then gave it a test piece of BMF and a wash.

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