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How to get wood grain results???

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I am trying to get some opinions on the best way recreate wood grain texture for steering wheels and other interior parts.

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Probably not the best way but I paint them with Testors "wood" and when dry I go over that with the Tamiya clear orange. I like the effect but I am sure someone else will come along with a better way.

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I use a brown sharpie with excellent results over the common white plastic. I can post a picture of a truck bed if you would like to see.

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I use a brown sharpie with excellent results over the common white plastic. I can post a picture of a truck bed if you would like to see.

Post it, Steve! What brand?

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I just use the brown Sharpie brand marker. Make a few passes and you'll see how you can control the color for darker and lighter shades. This will help you create a nice wood grain look, I did the bed as well as the bed rails with a sharpie.

image.jpeg

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I just use the brown Sharpie brand marker. Make a few passes and you'll see how you can control the color for darker and lighter shades. This will help you create a nice wood grain look, I did the bed as well as the bed rails with a sharpie.

image.jpeg

Don't forget that this plastic probably had wood grain engraved in it. Makes it much easier if all you have to do is color it!

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I just use the brown Sharpie brand marker. Make a few passes and you'll see how you can control the color for darker and lighter shades. This will help you create a nice wood grain look, I did the bed as well as the bed rails with a sharpie.

Looks great! Thanks!

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Don't forget that this plastic probably had wood grain engraved in it. Makes it much easier if all you have to do is color it!

the side rails were engraved. The bed was not engraved if I remember correctly. The marker did all the work, give it a try! 

Edited by 1hobby1

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I'm finishing an interior now where I used a light tan base on the steering wheel and brown on the strip on the dashboard then covered with clear orange. This works fine on very small areas. On larger areas such as a '49 Mercury Woody I did I used a  light tan for a base and used art pencils to create  a wood grain appearance. I then used clear yellow on the outer wood and clear orange on the inner panels. It was all cleared when the body was also cleared. The Sharpie idea is something I'll definitely try the next time, It looks much simpler.   

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the side rails were engraved. The bed was not engraved if I remember correctly. The marker did all the work, give it a try! 

Man, that looks GREAT !! Thanks. You made my day.:D

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This is the process I use.

file:///C:/Users/IMcra/Documents/models/Models/woody_painting.pdf

Edited by crazyjim

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I've always used a dry brush method that Irv Arter posted on a message board eons ago.  I have a PDF and am always happy to email anyone the file every time this question comes up. So PM me your email address and I'll send anyone who asks the file.  

 

 

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I've used a light tan or Testors Wood base, maybe a little weathering, as shown above for a Model T truck bed, and then I use Furniture markers. They contain wood stain, and they dry with a slight clear coat look. They come three shades to a pack, and this bed was done using the light and medium.

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Damm...that one looks good too. I've been itchin' to finish a couple of woodies I've got halfway through, but I didn't have a good handle on doing realistic wood finishes on plastic. Youse guys are tops. :D

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Here's a wood bed floor I did last year using balsa wood, Minwax, Evergreen strips painted silver, and then I clear coated everything..

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Take couple of different Vallejo or Citadel "flesh" tones. Paint the whole thing with the lighter one, then "drag" brush (use a brush with long bristles, load it up, wipe most of the paint off on a paper towel, but not as dry as you'd get it for drybrushing) the darker colour. Overpaint with Vallejo "Woodgrain" (reddish) for darker woods, Tamiya Clear orange for lighter woods. Add extra variation while applying this top coat, based on what your references show.

bestest,

M.

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Most excellent and helpful links and video references. Thank you, fog. :D

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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In 1/24-25, actual dimensional wood texture is going to look way out of scale unless you're building a wood cabin for a diorama. The paint techniques mentioned here should do the trick, or print out a wood pattern you like to make into a decal for flat panels like a woody, etc. Of course, you'll have to paint tubular or complex shapes like a steering wheel.

Edited by sjordan2

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In 1/24-25, actual dimensional wood texture is going to look way out of scale unless you're building a wood cabin for a diorama. 

I found that to be true many years back, doing model RR stuff and architectural models, especially with balsa, which usually looks WAY out of scale and toylike. The situation isn't helped by the fact that the majority of the balsa available in hobby shops seems to be significantly looser-grained than it was 50 years ago.

However...if you shop for very tightly-grained basswood, you can get nice scale-correct-looking grain effects.

The wood in tongue depressors and coffee stirrers is often nice and tight-grained too, and the coffee sticks make good planks for pickup beds in 1/24-1/25.

I've recently found some other very tight grained self-adhesive (and THIN) veneer woods that will do the trick too.

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