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Building Better Shocks for the Revell '29 Ford Roadster

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I got sucked into the hype and bought the new Revell 29 Roadster. The kit is extremely nice, except for the shocks. I couldn't bring myself to use them, so I had to make new ones. The nice thing is that it is fairly easy to separate the shock caps from the body. 

I didn't intent to do a tutorial, so some pictures are lacking, I apologize. 

Meh

 

Bought a styrene rod/tube combo pack from Evergreen

 

First I measured the lengths of the kit shocks so I know where I would need to be when done with the new ones. 

 

Choppy Choppy. i used a PE saw to carefully separate the caps from the bodies. 

 

I then carefully sanded the flat part of the shock caps flat and level. I made new bodies out of the styrene tube

 

I made a mockup to check the overall length. Perfect

 

I started with copper wire, but realized I would have to paint it. I tried solder, it looks like natural metal, but it's hard to handle without squishing the springs. I used the same rod as the shock bodies and wrapped it around, then straightened it out. I left them compressed like this so I could match the lengths exactly. I then carefully sanded the ends flat like normal springs. I left the solder springs on the plastic rod as a support while sanding, otherwise it would just bend all over the place

 

Then I used the shaft of a pick to put in between the coils and spin it. This spaces the coils evenly. I also made shafts that go in inside the tube and will mount inside the holes I drilled in the caps. This way they will be sort of pinned in there with glue for a secure bond. Also, this will keep everything together and elminate the chance of any bending of the solder springs. 

 

Here is the finished mockup. I will still need to paint the bodies and caps. I wanted to do the body from Aluminum tube, but didn't have the right size. 

 

This is the right solder size for these shocks

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Nice work!

Another alternative to wrapping the wire/solder then stretching it out is wrapping around a threaded bolt/screw. By keeping the wire in the thread valleys, uniform spacing can be attained.

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That is rosin core solder, will the rosin leak out of it and cause problems over time?

 

I have no idea

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Most of the big box craft stores (Michael's, A. C. Moore, and Hobby Lobby) have 22 gauge beading wire which should work just as well without the danger of "squishing".  This is not meant to take away from this great tutorial, just an alternative to the solder; which being rosin core will possibly leak out unless you seal the ends with superglue, and even then it may leak.  Just my $.02.

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Most of the big box craft stores (Michael's, A. C. Moore, and Hobby Lobby) have 22 gauge beading wire which should work just as well without the danger of "squishing".  This is not meant to take away from this great tutorial, just an alternative to the solder; which being rosin core will possibly leak out unless you seal the ends with superglue, and even then it may leak.  Just my $.02.

If you can get something that works other than solder, I would definitely recommend it. All I had at the time was the solder and copper and I wanted the natural look and was too impatient to wait to go buy something else. 

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Thanks for the great tutorial, Cameron!  I found some .032 50/50 solid solder at my local True Value hardware store.  This solder is used for soldering electrical wires and may be available at Radio Shack as well.  🤗👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻🏁

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Hey Guys, I found these spools of 22 gauge wire at Hobby lobby, and it comes in many flavors:lol: I'm using it for a project I'm working on now.

 

Cheers,

Lance

DSCN0869.JPG

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That is rosin core solder, will the rosin leak out of it and cause problems over time?

 

Don't use Rosin Core. I found out the hard way.
 

WILLYS NASGAS 05- ROSIN CORE DAMAGE.JPG

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Hey Guys, I found these spools of 22 gauge wire at Hobby lobby, and it comes in many flavors:lol: I'm using it for a project I'm working on now.

 

Cheers,

Lance

DSCN0869.JPG

You can also get this wire at WalMart in the craft section

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For those of you with a MIG welder, or know somebody who has one, the wire from the welder works pretty well

Edited by dragstk

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Don't use Rosin Core. I found out the hard way.
 

WILLYS NASGAS 05- ROSIN CORE DAMAGE.JPG

Are you sure that this is rosin core and not acid core?  Rosin is usually amber color and inert. That looks like acid residue.  If it is rosin, it can easily be cleaned off with some 91% rubbing (isopropyl) alcohol.   If it is acid, then you are probably SOL.

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Pete, you are correct, I suspect. Probably acid core. Thanks for the heads up.

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