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71 Plymouth GTX....2nd build

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This will be my second build. I have some new tips to use and new tools. Last build I didn't use primer, I am this time. I didn't do much detailing either, but plan on hand painting some stuff on this engine. Plan on a two color paint scheme. Going fiery orange for the main body with the tail and hood scoop black. Black interior as well. Very excited. Priming the body and larger parts now, along with engine. Plan on taking more time on letting paint and primer to dry longer. I hope by tomorrow evening I can start hand painting motor. 

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.....good for you, Eric James.....nice to read the phrase - very excited - in your write up. this should be a neat build, that fiery orange Testors is a great color. I'm in the midst of building a vintage drag 68 road runner and will be using that same paint for part of my build....best of luck on your new project, regards, the Ace............:D

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Thanks Ace. First build was fun, but as you get more tips from great people and learn, it is exciting. 

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Okay so this is going to be my rival build ;) looks like you're off to a good start man!

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Take your time with it,and keep checking how the different parts fit together.  Also remember to check how the different sub assemblies fit with each other before glueing it all together. Good luck on build number 2.

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Will do JR. This is a level 2. For some reason I started my first build with a 3 :)  I am taking the time to sand down the plastic left on pieces after taking them off. Also using a toothpick for glue instead of straight from the tube itself. 

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Couple of questions......

I notice a lot of ppl treat the body as a single build, engine, ETC. I guess I am saying after a while you don't go by directions, you have your own method? 

Also what is a good clear coat to finish off with? Do you use a clear coat for motor and all, or just the body? 

My last build I had my tires off and one was off the ground, what's a good way to prevent that? 

What skill level do most builders use? I know it depends on how long you have been in the hobby, but just curious  

Any other tips or hints are greatly appreciated. 

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This build is off to a good start. Its good to see that your moving forward and not getting discouraged with your first build. I think after modelers gain more experience they use the instructions as references. I learned that after I did a couple of mock ups/dry fittings that I could work on any section of the kit while I was at a stand still with other stages of the build. As for getting all four tires to touch the ground that will come from dry fitting and seeing how the model goes together and what needs to be tweaked, also its always good before starting any model to make sure the body and chassis are not warped because this could also be the cause for having one wheel up in the air and fitment issues.

I found that Testors Wet look clear works really well to finish off with but you can also try other brands to see what works best for you. Just remember when painting the best time is when its a nice dry, low humidity, sunny day with temperatures in the 70s and 80s. Do not paint on days when its raining, high humidity, and extremely hot weather or you will run into problems.

As far as skill level is concerned I started out with levels 2s and then as I felt more comfortable I moved on to level 3s and I've been building on and off for about 15 years. Sometimes level 2s can be a real beast and will find the advanced kits can sometimes be easier to build. I don't know if any modeler just builds specific levels I think it might just depend on subject matter and what is available for what they want to accomplish.

Hope this helped in some way.

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This build is off to a good start. Its good to see that your moving forward and not getting discouraged with your first build. I think after modelers gain more experience they use the instructions as references. I learned that after I did a couple of mock ups/dry fittings that I could work on any section of the kit while I was at a stand still with other stages of the build. As for getting all four tires to touch the ground that will come from dry fitting and seeing how the model goes together and what needs to be tweaked, also its always good before starting any model to make sure the body and chassis are not warped because this could also be the cause for having one wheel up in the air and fitment issues.

I found that Testors Wet look clear works really well to finish off with but you can also try other brands to see what works best for you. Just remember when painting the best time is when its a nice dry, low humidity, sunny day with temperatures in the 70s and 80s. Do not paint on days when its raining, high humidity, and extremely hot weather or you will run into problems.

As far as skill level is concerned I started out with levels 2s and then as I felt more comfortable I moved on to level 3s and I've been building on and off for about 15 years. Sometimes level 2s can be a real beast and will find the advanced kits can sometimes be easier to build. I don't know if any modeler just builds specific levels I think it might just depend on subject matter and what is available for what they want to accomplish.

Hope this helped in some way.

what do you do if body is warped?

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What I've done in the past is contact customer service and requested for a new body. Revell and Round 2 have great service but you may have to wait a while to get the new part. It also depends how badly warped they are but you can put the bodies in warm water for about 5 min to get the plastic pliable enough so that you can straighten them out but it takes patience. I've tried a couple of times but I'm not real good at it and have found that its never going to be truly straight. Other guys have tried it with more success they might have a better way to do it.

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Here is the motor coming along. Hand painting on 2nd build instead of all one color. Finishing up tonight. Got the steel color pipes and aluminum transmission case. The body will be this burnt orange. Wanted to give the motor a contrast to body. 

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I can relate to your wanting to slow down, you just want to get to the next model.  I have to remind myself to have fun, make it the way I want it to be.  Keep the pictures coming.

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My motor I have been working on. I am thinking I tried being to "colorful" and took away from what a real motor looks like. Please give me your opinion. My 2nd build. First motor I did was just solid grey. I only have the fan left to put on. 

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Perhaps you should paint the starter in semi gloss black and give the whole engine a light black wash. The wash will highlight the high spots and bring out more depth in the assembly making it look more realistic. I am sure some of the more experienced members will be able to offer more and possibly better advice. 

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You're of to a great start. On the engine, one thing I notice is that it looks like the oil pan and the block are cast together. You may want to sand and fill as needed so this is not as noticeable on the oil pan. An engine can have as great a difference in the look of your build as wheels and tires, Look at pictures of 1:1 cars and try to mimic what looks like you are trying to build. Because the engine block is usually sand casted the painted finish is usually flat or semi-gloss at best. The oil pan and valve covers are smooth stamped steel and usually turn out semi-gloss to gloss finish. If you are building a Street/Strip model then many of these parts could be chromed or cast aluminum or even polished aluminum. Parts like starters are usually different shades of black as are brackets unless its a Show Car where all this could be chromed. In some cases you may have cast aluminum heads and intake manifolds which may also be polished in some cases. A little thinned flat black or Detailer Black-It-Out will really show the cast detail on the engine. Look at the different colors on pulleys for the drive belts on the front of the engine. The most important thing is you are enjoying what you are doing.  

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Here is an update. Body color looks awesome. I have steel and aluminum contrast. Looks good.  I'm having problem with my airbrush and black paint. Coming out heavy and splotchy. Don't know what's going on. Any suggestions? Hard to see in picture but I took one anyways. 

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Perhaps you should paint the starter in semi gloss black and give the whole engine a light black wash. The wash will highlight the high spots and bring out more depth in the assembly making it look more realistic. I am sure some of the more experienced members will be able to offer more and possibly better advice. 

 

JT what is a light black wash? I am new to this. Thanks. 

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You're of to a great start. On the engine, one thing I notice is that it looks like the oil pan and the block are cast together. You may want to sand and fill as needed so this is not as noticeable on the oil pan. An engine can have as great a difference in the look of your build as wheels and tires, Look at pictures of 1:1 cars and try to mimic what looks like you are trying to build. Because the engine block is usually sand casted the painted finish is usually flat or semi-gloss at best. The oil pan and valve covers are smooth stamped steel and usually turn out semi-gloss to gloss finish. If you are building a Street/Strip model then many of these parts could be chromed or cast aluminum or even polished aluminum. Parts like starters are usually different shades of black as are brackets unless its a Show Car where all this could be chromed. In some cases you may have cast aluminum heads and intake manifolds which may also be polished in some cases. A little thinned flat black or Detailer Black-It-Out will really show the cast detail on the engine. Look at the different colors on pulleys for the drive belts on the front of the engine. The most important thing is you are enjoying what you are doing.  

espo: I don't know if it is a rule for building cars, but I don't know much about the real thing :) when you look up for references and pictures, do you just google that? Piece by piece? What is sand cast? Again I am new. I looked up an engine online and found orange and blue high gloss motors. But all motors were in cars and hard to tell what each side looked like. Anyways, thanks for the tips and advice. 

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Eric, black wash is simply the cap from your flat black paint with some thinner added. The more thinner the lighter the wash, less thinner the darker the wash,. What it does is flow into the detail of the motor while leaving the main color mostly unchanged. It makes the cast in details pop. Start light -let it dry- and see if its what you want.

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Also, to cut parts from sprue and trim off as well as taking the back of your blade to trim off mold lines, will greatly increase your satisfaction at the end results. It takes a little time, but well worth the effort. Enjoying your build.

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Also, to cut parts from sprue and trim off as well as taking the back of your blade to trim off mold lines, will greatly increase your satisfaction at the end results. It takes a little time, but well worth the effort. Enjoying your build.

mold lines? So follow lines of plastic and make them deeper?

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Eric, black wash is simply the cap from your flat black paint with some thinner added. The more thinner the lighter the wash, less thinner the darker the wash,. What it does is flow into the detail of the motor while leaving the main color mostly unchanged. It makes the cast in details pop. Start light -let it dry- and see if its what you want.

do I brush on the thinned paint?

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yes, try it on a painted piece of tree or unused part as a trail till you get the thinning correct

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mold lines? So follow lines of plastic and make them deeper?

No. Mold lines are usually thin raised lines on the parts where the 2 halves of the mold split when they remove the parts from the mold. These mold lines are usually found along the top edges of the fenders and the edges of the roofline. You can normally see that they shouldn't be there. Sanding sticks are usually enough to knock them down. If you look at the top of your seats where they were attached to the sprue, you will see a fine raised line running from that point down either side of the seats. Those are mold lines.

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