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When/What do you clear coat?


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I am working on my second build. I have been watching videos and trying to figure out clear coating. Is the clear coat always a lacquer? I have seen a product called Pledge future being used. Is this considered a clear coat product, or does this go over at the clear coat to help just the shine? Is the process for painting the body;  priming, color, then clear coat? I am a little confused. Also, do you clear coat every part of the car? Dashboard, seats, motor, chassis, ETC? I have noticed that in my second build my seats and interior tub doesn't look to shiny. I guess this is where you would clear coat? Sorry for the dumb questions, just new and want to have a better build the next time. 

 

Thank you,

 

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i would  only  clearcoat   the body.   i use  rattle cans   to paint chassis, interior and others parts  and use an airbrush  on body for a  better smooth  finish.   clear coat  may not always be lacquer. stick with one brand for  primer, base coat and clearcoat  and you should have good luck.   i  like  zero paint.   they  have a special  primer  for plastic,  metal  and resin cast.   they have great base coat  colors that match  original  colors like sunoco  blue and sunoco yellow for stripes.   clear coat  is designed to work on all  of there paint products  .   just  mist  coat over decals  for the first coats.    hope this helps out.

ZP-1107-Cobra-Viking-Blue-60ml.jpg

Edited by 65slotcar
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No, not all clear coats are lacquer,  there are , enamel, lacquer, acrylic ,urethane clear coats, just like the paints, its always best to use the same type of paint and clear,  meaning,  if you use enamel paints, use enamel clear, there are always exceptions, like you can use urethane clear over pretty much all paints. 

Yes, its primer, paint, clear, in that order, and no, you only want to clear coat body parts that have been painted body color ,  as for the interior's, no you don't want to gloss clear coat the interior,  the only time interiors would have a sheen would be if you were trying to replicate leather.   Now, at the same time, interiors are not completely flat either,  matte or satin paints would work for interiors.

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agreed with guys above. no need to clearcoat every part of a car, basically the part need to be clear coat is the body parts including wings.

it should be primer, paint, decal and then clear coat.

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As an airplane modeler moving into car modeling, I still waffle about clear coats. In airplanes, I always paint the color coat, then do a Future coat for a high gloss finish suitable for decals, then follow with varying degrees of dull-coats, depending on what is proper for a given aircraft. In cars, since I'm not doing any dull or "lived in" finishes, everything should be some degree of shiny. No decals, no dull finishes, nothing yet requiring major decals. Seems like it should be easier, right?

Nope.

Of the nine (I think) cars I've done since moving away from airplanes, I do not have one rule for all models, even though I want them all shiny. Everything I choose makes a difference. For the most part I don't try for a hard, thick showroom shine any more. When I do, I end up ruining paint that looked passable before. I just want a nice reflection. Future is something I use on ALL builds at some point, whether windshields or instruments or seats, but I cannot get a good final gloss on bodies with it. Wax gives that, but it can bury itself in crevices and errors make things worse. Tamiya glosses are predictable, but often not very shiny. 

Some paints are glossy enough on their own that a simply buff with a tack-free cloth is enough. If that isn't good enough, I have to play around. Some paints like glosses, some don't. Using a can vs and airbrush affects things too. There is no one simple rule. If you try to find one, you'll go nuts. Almost everything I have built in cars is lacquered, but sometimes brands change the results.

I used to hate it when folks told me this, but you just have to play around. See what works for what you are building. If you try to apply one rule to all models you will not be happy with the results all the time.

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As William pointed out, it is always safest, to stick with one brand of paint through the entire application process, primer, paint, clear. If you are still rattle canning it like me, then Duplicolor is a good bet.

Having said that, I have had my best results (in rattle cans) with Krylon primer (from Walmart) and Testors One Coat lacquer paint and clear. 

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As William pointed out, it is always safest, to stick with one brand of paint through the entire application process, primer, paint, clear. If you are still rattle canning it like me, then Duplicolor is a good bet.

Having said that, I have had my best results (in rattle cans) with Krylon primer (from Walmart) and Testors One Coat lacquer paint and clear. 

Im with Jantrix!  Duplicolor products are excellent! they dry fast, and are VERY durable.

Edited by Dann Tier
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So I don't need to use primer out of a can from Walmart, then Testor paints? Just curious. 

Walmart's cheap house brand gray primer is excellent stuff, and cheap. So far I've never found any incompatibility between it and either plastic or any kind of paint I've laid on it.

One way I use clear is for interiors. If I'm doing an interior that's upholstered in vinyl (i.e., plastic) or leather, I'll often paint it in flats (sometimes even with a brush), and then "mist" on one or two or three coats of a rattlecan semigloss or "satin" clear. Sometimes I'll even use clear gloss for this, if that's all I have on hand. This gives a satisfactory sheen. The trick is to MIST these coats on, so they don't flow out to a glossy shine before they dry.

For bodies, these days I try to get by without a clearcoat when I can, but this isn't always possible, so I use them as needed. It would take me a whole thread to explain what I do, and when, and how, and why. There is no "one way" to do things; every paint job is a law unto itself.

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Walmart's cheap house brand gray primer is excellent stuff, and cheap. So far I've never found any incompatibility between it and either plastic or any kind of paint I've laid on it.

One way I use clear is for interiors. If I'm doing an interior that's upholstered in vinyl (i.e., plastic) or leather, I'll often paint it in flats (sometimes even with a brush), and then "mist" on one or two or three coats of a rattlecan semigloss or "satin" clear. Sometimes I'll even use clear gloss for this, if that's all I have on hand. This gives a satisfactory sheen. The trick is to MIST these coats on, so they don't flow out to a glossy shine before they dry.

For bodies, these days I try to get by without a clearcoat when I can, but this isn't always possible, so I use them as needed. It would take me a whole thread to explain what I do, and when, and how, and why. There is no "one way" to do things; every paint job is a law unto itself.

Do you use grey primer or white?

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Do you use grey primer or white?

Both. The gray for general use, the white for use under white, yellow, or sometimes red.

When I use the white, I sometimes need to lay down a coat of the gray first, then the white.

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Both. The gray for general use, the white for use under white, yellow, or sometimes red.

When I use the white, I sometimes need to lay down a coat of the gray first, then the white.

Snake, sorry for all the questions. You are just a big help right now.. When putting together a model, I know there is no wrong way to do it, but do most ppl paint and do the body first? Or do you generally work page to page in the instructions? Do you prime everything at once? Do you break off the pieces from the "branches" all at the start or as you go? Just trying to get a feel for it.. I wish I could watch someone start a model and finish it all.. I need to youtube a video. I am sure it is out there of watching the WHOLE process.

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Snake, sorry for all the questions. You are just a big help right now.. When putting together a model, I know there is no wrong way to do it, but do most ppl paint and do the body first? Or do you generally work page to page in the instructions? Do you prime everything at once? Do you break off the pieces from the "branches" all at the start or as you go? Just trying to get a feel for it.. I wish I could watch someone start a model and finish it all.. I need to youtube a video. I am sure it is out there of watching the WHOLE process.

Each kit presents it's own problems/solutions. I usually go with the instruction sequence just because there might be an issue with fitment. That said, test fit all bits before gluing. If at all possible build in sub assemblies. Like do up the engine as a whole, (minus bits that are chrome or painted a different color) then maybe the next sub. Try and leave parts on the trees until you need them. That way, they stay easy to find (not always...Murphy's Law) and you won't be fretting over that last small bit that just was there a minute ago. Also, instead of breaking, use a small nipper/cutter or X-acto blade to remove part cleanly. Do not forget prework...cleaning mold lines, sprue tags, etc.

Edited by lordairgtar
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Each kit presents it's own problems/solutions. I usually go with the instruction sequence just because there might be an issue with fitment. That said, test fit all bits before gluing. If at all possible build in sub assemblies. Like do up the engine as a whole, (minus bits that are chrome or painted a different color) then maybe the next sub. Try and leave parts on the trees until you need them. That way, they stay easy to find (not always...Murphy's Law) and you won't be fretting over that last small bit that just was there a minute ago. Also, instead of breaking, use a small nipper/cutter or X-acto blade to remove part cleanly. Do not forget prework...cleaning mold lines, sprue tags, etc.

Got you.. What grit do you use to sand mold lines? I was testing that out last night for the first time... I also didn't know if I over sanded. Do you just sand until the marker is gone? I do use an xacto knife. I made the mistake my first kit and broke the windshield wipers and stuff off... Lesson learned :)

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Snake, sorry for all the questions. You are just a big help right now.. When putting together a model, I know there is no wrong way to do it, but do most ppl paint and do the body first? Or do you generally work page to page in the instructions? Do you prime everything at once? Do you break off the pieces from the "branches" all at the start or as you go? Just trying to get a feel for it.. I wish I could watch someone start a model and finish it all.. I need to youtube a video. I am sure it is out there of watching the WHOLE process.

Personally, I clean everything in a big Tupperware tub with water and Dawn dish soap, then while that is drying I work on something else. After everything is dry I prep the body for primer by inspecting it for mold lines, scratches, sink marks, and any other irregularities and clean/fix any problems including body parts that are separate but should be body color (including attaching things like valance panels if it won't hinder assembly). Then I prime the body and while its drying I move on to the engine sub assembly just doing the parts that will be the main engine color. Then I work on the chassis and suspension, then the interior subassemblies and if the primer is dry and ready I move to wet sanding the body and prepping for paint. I move around a lot to allow paint to dry but I try to get the body painted sooner rather than later so while it's drying I can work on detailing the engine, chassis, interior and wheels. But as many have said, there is no one way to do it and most of what I just described happens over days and weeks and sometimes months. Most of us have multiple projects going at any given time so while we are waiting on paint to dry or cure we have something else to work on. I currently have a dodge van waiting on decals and clear, I mini cooper waiting on final color coat, clear, and assembly, and a 69 f-100 in final assembly, with a 56 Chrysler 300 getting ready for cleaning. And a 69 Barracuda in mock up. And a revel 29 Model A in the staring at waiting for inspiration stage. 

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Personally, I clean everything in a big Tupperware tub with water and Dawn dish soap, then while that is drying I work on something else. After everything is dry I prep the body for primer by inspecting it for mold lines, scratches, sink marks, and any other irregularities and clean/fix any problems including body parts that are separate but should be body color (including attaching things like valance panels if it won't hinder assembly). Then I prime the body and while its drying I move on to the engine sub assembly just doing the parts that will be the main engine color. Then I work on the chassis and suspension, then the interior subassemblies and if the primer is dry and ready I move to wet sanding the body and prepping for paint. I move around a lot to allow paint to dry but I try to get the body painted sooner rather than later so while it's drying I can work on detailing the engine, chassis, interior and wheels. But as many have said, there is no one way to do it and most of what I just described happens over days and weeks and sometimes months. Most of us have multiple projects going at any given time so while we are waiting on paint to dry or cure we have something else to work on. I currently have a dodge van waiting on decals and clear, I mini cooper waiting on final color coat, clear, and assembly, and a 69 f-100 in final assembly, with a 56 Chrysler 300 getting ready for cleaning. And a 69 Barracuda in mock up. And a revel 29 Model A in the staring at waiting for inspiration stage. 

MGL, what does wet sand the primer do??? What is the purpose of that?

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As William pointed out, it is always safest, to stick with one brand of paint through the entire application process, primer, paint, clear. If you are still rattle canning it like me, then Duplicolor is a good bet.

Having said that, I have had my best results (in rattle cans) with Krylon primer (from Walmart) and Testors One Coat lacquer paint and clear. 

Totally agree.

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MGL, what does wet sand the primer do??? What is the purpose of that?

Primer typically has a slight texture to it so I wet sand to about 1000 grit until it's smooth. The smoother the surface the smoother your color coat will lay down. I go by feel but if the primer has a bit of shine to it it's about right. That being said, I have gotten some pretty good paint jobs without wet sanding the primer and one of my best paint jobs was Tamiya British green over raw plastic, no primer, no prep, just removed some minor mold lines with an x-acto blade held sideways to the line and perpendicular to the surface. I have never been able to reproduce that with so little effort.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Got you.. What grit do you use to sand mold lines? I was testing that out last night for the first time... I also didn't know if I over sanded. Do you just sand until the marker is gone? I do use an xacto knife. I made the mistake my first kit and broke the windshield wipers and stuff off... Lesson learned :)

Sorry it took so long to get back to you. X-acto blade for paring of the bulk on the mold line, then light grit sand paper to smooth it out. Maybe a shot of primer, let dry, then sand to see if I got all the lows and highs. It's all trial and error sometimes to find the technique that works for you. Good lighting is always good.

 

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I have glossed Tamiya grey primer with Testors One Coat clear and used Krylon paint and Cleared it with Testors clear. Tamiya is always my primer. I have used Walmart primer but it's out of stock so much I stopped using it... Walmart primer is good..

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For me it depends on 

A - the finish I'm trying  to replicate / achieve

 

B - the quality of the finish/ gloss  I ended up with straight out of the can .

If I feel like its slick enough  to rub out without too much effort I don't clear it.

 

there's no clear on this . post-9887-0-87068100-1425396122_thumb.jppost-9887-0-04828200-1426808858_thumb.jp

Edited by gtx6970
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