Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

Firing order for American engines.


Recommended Posts

I have to admit I admire you guys who go to this level of detail. But I don't understand why you would do it. It's a feature that literally nobody will ever notice, even a judge at a contest. This is taking rivet counting to the ultimate extreme.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to admit I admire you guys who go to this level of detail. But I don't understand why you would do it. It's a feature that literally nobody will ever notice, even a judge at a contest. This is taking rivet counting to the ultimate extreme.

I tend to agree. I'd get it right on a 1/12 or 1/8 scale model, but probably wouldn't bother on anything smaller.

Still, it's a little easier to avoid the "hair part" look a lot of model distributors get if you have something to look at for reference. 

There are some 1:1 guys (not me) who build a lot of the same engines (like smallblock Chebbys) who would spot a wrong firing order immediately though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd be glad to see scale models with scale diameter ignition wires routed in a realistic scale way and not the "rainbow" way that some people do it, never mind correct firing order.

Agreed 100%. It's funny how people will argue that wires that are scale-correct diameter don't look "right".

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

including/ executing correct firing order can encourage research into other details which do get noticed. it's all part of the process, and different people put emphasis on different things.

when someone places value on a detail, they tend to extol its value and cannot believe that there are those who would dare not include. but if the detail is deemed frivolous, all who would consider are wasting their time and effort, and in fact may well explain attrition in the Hobby as the elders of the tribe die off.

Edited by plastic-mechanic
additional thought on the subject
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I do actually add that kind of detail. I wire them all in the correct firing order. It doesn't take any longer to do than not doing so

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always try to use the correct wire diameter too. I've seen some builds where the wires are just too thick.

When I do actually add that kind of detail. I wire them all in the correct firing order. It doesn't take any longer to do than not doing so

Me too, and it really fun thrying 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having been a judge in many contest here in the Phoenix area over the past two decades I can tell you this is something that has never been judged,mentioned or even discussed.;)

I've judged (and been head judge in the automotive category) quite a few contests in the Orlando area myself. I've also been known to spin wrenches on numerous 1:1 vehicles. While I don't know the exact firing order of every engine made, it becomes quite obvious that the "hair part" indicates that the builder did not do the research...and the model lost points because of it. If you're getting into that level of detail, the detailing should be correct (or at least have the appearance of being correct) rather than the "hair part". 

I know of no factory stock engines that had the "hair part"; some could be re-wired (for trailer-queen show cars that wouldn't run) or modified using OEM parts (the 76 Pontiac with HEI, for example) to accomplish this, but as a general rule, if the coil was external, "hair parting" was incorrect.

Edited by BigTallDad
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If a contest judge takes away for incorrect firing order, then correct ignition wire diameter, correct hose clamps, correct washer bottles, correct master cylinder plumbing, etc. should also be fair game.

In other words, if the judges are going to get so nit-picky that they look to see if the firing order is correct... then they have to consider all underhood details. Obviously this is taking things too far. But I agree that "4 to the left and 4 to the right" looks pretty lame.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I wire engines, I use the correct firing order.  Not because it is correct, but simply because one has to choose a firing order anyway, might as well use the correct one.  I start with the easiest lead first and work my way round.  It is often impossible to view the firing order in a completed engine bay anyway but doing it this way gives some pride and satisfaction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tend to agree. I'd get it right on a 1/12 or 1/8 scale model, but probably wouldn't bother on anything smaller.

Very helpful thread!

I like to use the correct firing order, even in 1:43 scale. :D  I also scratch-build the ignition coil and made some spark plug boots (which aren't really visible on this engine).  But I have to fess up that I didn't wire up the primary side of the coil to the distributor or the 12V ignition lead from the firewall to the distributor - I couldn't find insulated wire thin enough to look in-scale for 1:43.

EngineChassis04_zpsa01a77eb.jpg

EngineCompRtRear01_zps98f0884a.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always get a chuckle out of this subject when it comes up.  There are so many other details that can enhance and engine compartment more that firing order is hardly very high on the list.  For instance if you get the firing order right but the wires look like a really skinny spider sitting on top of the engine and don't droop as the real ones do, then the firing order is hardly relevant.  A couple of weeks ago, I judged a contest where one builder had a throttle cable routed correctly but didn't have it conected to anything on the carburetor. Points off!  When it comes to judging, my first thought of the engine compartment is does it look right.  After all, we are creating the illusion of the real deal and the old Mark I eyeball is generally a good judge of that.  Then it comes down to details.  All the detail in the world doesn't matter if it doesn't look right. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like I said,

If your going to wire it , it takes absolutely NO longer  to wire it as OEM as it does to not ......so why not do it right.

Having it judged or not is irrelevant ,,,,or just how far your going as far as the level of  detail.

For me its about satisfaction . I don't do contests. I build for ME  and ME ALONE .  I like the fact I can look under the hood of a model car and know its right for the AMOUNT of detail I WANT TO PUT INTO IT . 

When I build more than box stock ( anymore its extremely rare )  About the most I do is plug wires and heater hoses . I'll wire it correctly and try my best to route the hoses like OEM  from where they enter the engine block to where they enter the firewall ,,I want it  the best I could do.  For me that's all I  need  to make me happy with it .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

I tend to agree. I'd get it right on a 1/12 or 1/8 scale model, but probably wouldn't bother on anything smaller.

Still, it's a little easier to avoid the "hair part" look a lot of model distributors get if you have something to look at for reference. 

There are some 1:1 guys (not me) who build a lot of the same engines (like smallblock Chebbys) who would spot a wrong firing order immediately though.

indeed. 18436572 ...it's how smart people count to eight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guys, if you're following through with wiring a 1:25 distributor, just cross the wires up a little at the cap, that's more than enough.

Larger scales should be more correct, my opinion.  Just do it like the millions of closeup pics available.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...