Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum
modelfink

uncommon hot rod engine choice

Recommended Posts

Any ideas for an uncommon engine choice for a 34 Ford rat rod? Something other than a SBC or flathead V8 but beefy and mean.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Y-block Ford is very unusual and can make some pretty serious power these days. It's available in the Revell '57 Ford kits and elsewhere. 

The odd stacked intake-port configuration of the original heads made the engine not-too-popular for high-output applications in the dim past, and speed equipment wasn't plentiful. 

312-head-in.jpg   

Still, blown engines made credible power...like the Paxton-blown rig optional in the '57 Fords.   400px-Ford_Y-block_312.jpg         

These days, alloy heads (Mummert) with better porting are available.

http://www.hotrod.com/events/1510-jon-kaases-insanely-customized-ford-y-block-makes-nearly-600-hp/

 

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you really want to go different, because almost everything and anything has ben used in them you could go with a Studebaker. Use the R4 setup from the AMT Avanti kit.

 

Edited by Longbox55

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you really want to go different, because almost everything and anything has ben used in them you could go with a Studebaker. Use the R4 setup from the AMT Avanti kit.

Great idea. The Studebaker V8 is a stout engine, much overlooked (and don't listen to the "experts" who say it's a Ford 289...it ain't).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The y-block and Stude 289 are great choices. Some other alternatives are an inline 6 from the AMT '37 and '51 Chevys. Also a Buick 401 from the AMT late 60's Riviera kits. They look great but the unusual exhaust port spacing will make headers tricky. The AMT '53 Ford pickup has e pretty nice early hemi, as does the AMT '57 Chrysler. A slant six from the Lindberg '64 Dodge 330?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of Y-blocks...this is probably one of the rarest of rare speed-equipment setups in the history of the universe.

It's a Hilborn mechanical fuel-injection rig made specifically for the oddly ported Y-block.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTHSguD8Ob_R_sFfSc83cS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's one that's way off the wall, if you're willing to go this direction, a Nissan inline engine. Unfortunately, the only really good Nissan inline 6 is in the Tamiya '71 GT-R (or at least that I know of), and you might get lots of flak for putting a Japanese engine in a hot rod. However, it is something that has been done in 1:1, by Frank Oddo (yes, THAT Frank Oddo) of all people. Street Rodder built a Model A back in the mid '70s using the engine and drivetrain from a '76 Nissan pickup called the DSR-76.

 

 

Edited by Longbox55

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The y-block and Stude 289 are great choices. Some other alternatives are an inline 6 from the AMT '37 and '51 Chevys. 

The Chevy inline 6 was popular as hot-rod material. There are a couple of different trick heads and intake-exhaust setups in the AMT '51 Chevy kits Jantrix mentions, and a Wayne head and manifold in the Galaxie '48 Chevy kits.

Image result for hot-rod chevy stovebolt       7fe37ea6041a0e9169a6237b8c2f1dc9.jpg

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like it will be the Hemi from the AMT 53 ford since I already have one of those kits. The 8 carb fuel injected set up should be fun, challenging and look cool

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good choice. IIRC, it's a Desoto Firedome.

Had you gone with the Chevy 6 (an engine I'm extremely familiar with), the AMT '51 Bel Air come with the Wayne/Fisher crossflow head, which is virtually impossible to find in the 1:1 world. Very few were made, the GMC version, while still extremely rare, is more common.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like it will be the Hemi from the AMT 53 ford since I already have one of those kits. The 8 carb fuel injected set up should be fun, challenging and look cool

I agree. Looking forward to seeing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you really want to go different, because almost everything and anything has ben used in them you could go with a Studebaker. Use the R4 setup from the AMT Avanti kit.

 

I'm planning to put a Stude engine in a Revell '29 A, but I wouldn't call it beefy. Using it because this is supposed to be a low-buck "recycled" rod in the mid/late '60s. I'm thinking a Stude engine would have been dirt-cheap in those days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about a Chrysler Turbine engine? That's about as uncommon as you could get.:P A Buddy of mine sent me a pic of a 55 Chevy with a Marine engine. I think it was a 10 cylinder. possibilities.....

 

Cheers,

Lance

c12_0603_17z-1963_chrysler_turbine_car-turbine_engine.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm planning to put a Stude engine in a Revell '29 A, but I wouldn't call it beefy. Using it because this is supposed to be a low-buck "recycled" rod in the mid/late '60s. I'm thinking a Stude engine would have been dirt-cheap in those days.

I dunno, I've seen those V8 Studes run the hill at Newport. Even in stock for, they're plenty fast, running low 18 to 20 flat on an 1500 ft uphill course. Those weren't even the performace models, just 2 bbl 250 inch version. The '53 coupe was the one that turned that low 18 second run, and the 20 flat was a 3/4 ton truck. The flatheads, which the Lions club that puts the event on turn a blind eye to modifications (they're supposed to be "stock") couldn't turn anywhere close to those times.

Edited by Longbox55

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like it will be the Hemi from the AMT 53 ford since I already have one of those kits. The 8 carb fuel injected set up should be fun, challenging and look cool

You can have 8 carbs or fuel injection, but not both. ;)  I'm using the same motor in my '48 Ford custom- I used the 8 carbs and made aluminum velocity stacks and it looks pretty wicked. The plug wires are shrouded so that makes it real easy to wire, just need to drill a hole in the ends of the shrouds big enough to glue 4 wires in. The front cover has a nice flat bottom that makes mounting pretty easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm planning to put a Stude engine in a Revell '29 A, but I wouldn't call it beefy. Using it because this is supposed to be a low-buck "recycled" rod in the mid/late '60s. I'm thinking a Stude engine would have been dirt-cheap in those days.

The Studebreaker 232 / 259 / 289 / 304 is physically a little bigger outside than a SBC, wider through the heads. Also heavier. There actually are aftermarket bits for them, but it's kinda a semi-orphan like the Y-block. You're right about it being cheap too. They're STILL cheap. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could also get the inline six out of the AMT 50 Chevy's or the Caddy engine out of Revell's 59 Cadillac.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...