Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum
irishmike

Question about buffing metalizer paint

Recommended Posts

I've recently got back into the hobby. I'm going to try using Model Master Metalizer (buffing) on a set of wheels. I've heard that using a Qtip or a used t-shirt works great for buffing but I have a couple questions. Do you just do the buffing after your final coat or do you do it in between coats? Also, after the final coat should you wait until it's completely dry to start buffing it or do you have to start say 15-20 minutes afterwards? Thanks for your help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I've learned about it from much trial and error:

1) Wait until it's completely dry to buff it. It will smear or scratch easily if it's the least bit wet. 2 hours, minimum for me now. And if the humidity is high, it will take longer. If you can smell it much. you probably don't want to try to buff it.

2) No need to do anything between coats, unless you shoot it dry and orange-peely. Successive coats will not "flow" it out usually, so you'll have to sand the peel out with 800 grit or finer. It's really best not to touch it between coats.

3) It will NOT hide any surface flaws or rough primer work. 

4) I try to shoot it wet, so that every coat will slick out smooth. If you try to mist it on, it will get grainy, and no amount of buffing will make it slick. it will look like slightly polished rough-cast material, NOT polished sheet or machined metal.

5) Because it won't hide any scratches or surface roughness, I usually don't primer intricate parts like wheels any more, unless I'm certain I can get a perfect, slick primer coat down. Sanding orange-peel out of primer on intricately-shaped parts is difficult at best, impossible at worst.

6) Because I don't primer my small and intricate parts, I always thoroughly scrub them with Comet or other abrasive cleaner, hot water, and a toothbrush. This gives the surface of the parts enough "tooth" for good adhesion, actually seems to make the stuff flow out a little better, and also seems to make it less likely you'll buff through sharp edges.

7) test it on some similar parts before you commit to using it on a model you care about. Get familiar with using it, because it doesn't really handle like other paints.

8) If you shoot it slick, 2-3 coats is plenty. It may look hazy. That's OK. If you did it right, polishing it will bring up a smooth metallic sheen that looks just like real polished metal.

9) I've tried about everything to polish it. What works best for me is the fleece-side of old cotton sweatshirt material.

The front wheel and the canopy on this were done with buffing metalizer. (The rest is another process).

DSCN1218_zps86409983.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buff it Once all coats are on.

 

Ill usually wait a few hours before buffing mine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bill has pretty much said it all. I generally wait until the next day to buff my Metalizers, but regardless it should be completely cured and hardened. Fortunately this is a matter of hours and not days. Waiting overnight ensures that it will resist rubbing off when handled (it's not fool proof but it helps enormously,) I get very good results with a soft old t-shirt. For most parts, if they are styrene and I know ahead of time that they'll only get a Metalizer finish I apply it directly to the styrene with no primer coat. If I've had to sand the styrene then I polish the plastic completely to a smooth finish before applying the Metalizer. It Shows Everything!!!! As much as possible if I'm applying it with a brush (yes, despite Testors indications, I apply the jar stuff to small parts with a brush) I try to get it down in 1 coat. For medium to large areas spraying is a must and applying more than 1 coat is generally trouble free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Metallic buffing paints are also very fragile in handling. They will show fingerprints if handheld with bare hands (if your finger are slightly dirty or sweaty).  You can seal those paints with clear but it dulls the sheen (even if using water-based clear).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I shoot one coat over either raw, polished plastic or very smooth primer and buff it out initially after about 45 minutes with a cotton swab- If I wait too long the metal particles don't tamp down into the lacquer base properly. I don't try to get it super shiny during this intial buffing, I'm more concerned with flattening the finish at this point. Then I'll go back the next day and do a final buffing with an old T-shirt or cotton sock to a high shine. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most on here will also advise NOT to use the Metalizer Sealer, as it will change the nice metallic look to silver paint in a heart beat. Just make sure that once you buff it out, you are not planning on handling the surface much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...