Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum
BDSchindler

Body Fillers - what do you use?

Recommended Posts

Rookie question here but on the recommendation of a good friend of mine, I've been using Evercoat Polyester Glazing Putty but the setup time is so short that it starts to lump on me and just frustrates the beejeevers out of me.  I tend to use an amount about the size of a half dollar and just basically a dot of hardener and I get about 10 minutes of time to apply it before it gets clumpy and I go back for more.  It feels like I am using more than I should.  I know the more experienced I get using it will result in better results.  

I do like it as it sets up in a short amount of time and sanding is fairly easy as well as the fact I can sand it inside of an hour...which is a plus.

Years ago I used squadron green but that has tendency to melt the plastic and the testers stuff is just garbage in my opinion.

So... what do you use and how are the results?

evercoat.thumb.jpg.9019c02f28f9c5823e7e5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Years ago I used squadron green but that has tendency to melt the plastic and the testers stuff is just garbage in my opinion.

So... what do you use and how are the results?

 

I use Squadron Green because I agree with you about Testors.

If you're going to use Testors, you just as well use drywall compound! :P

The Squadron Green is not the best stuff on the planet, but I use so little of it, that it really doesn't warrant going out & buying a quart of something, or messing with 2 part fillers.

The occasional gouge or sink mark is pretty much all that I use putty for.

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

two part filler, like the evercoat you show, are great because they do not shrink, but if you buy off/discount brands, sometimes they are quite porous and you have to use a load of primer. They also do not "bite" into the plastic and if you do not rough up the surface, may pop off later in your project. I will say that I use the stuff you show above, but I also use spot putty for smaller work, and even mister hobby dissolved putty for things like ejector pin marks etc. I even will use melted sprue when needed. Essentially saying, no one putty for all uses, find what works for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use several different things, depending on exactly what I need to do.

CA glue.

Loctite Superglue Gel (ask for it by name!).

J-B Weld epoxy.

Sikkens body putty, final-sealed and stabilized with thin CA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love bodywork and have used many things since the 60's .. Plastic Wood, Plastic Steel (Plastic anything from the 60's) and still have a large can of Evercoat from the 90's that about 80% full and runny. I have green, white and and every other Squadron Putty color. They all worked with differing degrees of success.

I now use Bondo Professional Glazing & Spot Putty exclusive. The 2-part because it's as good as Evercoat but comes in 3 oz tubes!  The 1-part comes in 3 oz tubes also and is comparable to Squadron putty for shallow fills. These two tubes do everything for me and are even available in local stores here in the mountains.These are modeler's sized tubes so there's little waste and cost around $5 or less!

Edited by Foxer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I now use Bondo Professional Glazing & Spot Putty exclusive. The 2-part because it's as good as Evercoat but comes in 3 oz tubes!  The 1-part comes in 3 oz tubes also and is comparable to Squadron putty for shallow fills. These two tubes do everything for me and are even available in local stores here in the mountains.These are modeler's sized tubes so there's little waste and cost around $5 or less!

I pretty much agree. I do a lot of heavy bodywork and mods, and those two will do you fine. The "professional" stuff from Bondo is a two-part catalyzed polyester just like the Evercoat, but it's less viscous (runnier). I use the old style one-part lacquer putty only for very small fills like minor scratches or pinholes.

DECEMBER26_2014184_zps09927d3d.jpg

DEC282014Lakester016_zpsb153fd02.jpg

This is the small package.  bondor-professional-glazing-and-spot-put

There's no need to "seal" the two-part. Primer will do the job. just like it does on 1:1 cars.

One-part Squadron green for a very small imperfection...

DSCN9882_zpsuec34ess.jpg

First coat of paint...

DSCN0348_zps6ox7gud0.jpg

HOWEVER, when I need a filler that adheres exceptionally well and has structural strength, I use epoxy thickened with cotton-flock, cabosil or mocroballoon.

This is cotton-flock thickened epoxy. It's harder to sand than a polyester product, but it will hold a bunch of poorly-fitting parts together very well. A Bondo-like polyester product, or a one-part lacquer putty, simply will not have enough strength or adhesion.

DSCN0246_zpsiyodjimm.jpg

This is epoxy thickened with microballoon.

DSCN9613_zps72f92427.jpg

Image result for ace-garageguy challenger one

The final shaping, where adhesion to bare plastic was no longer an issue, was done with two-part polyester like Evercoat or Bondo Professional...

Image result for ace-garageguy challenger one

Image result for ace-garageguy challenger one

The Loctite Superglue Gel that Snake recommends works exceptionally well for filling edges of opening panels that need a tough and resilient fill that neither one-part lacquer putties OR Bondo-like two-part putties will give you. Neither of those products adhere well enough to edges, and they'll crack off or chip. The Loctite gel is there to stay, and can be filed and sanded for a perfect fit between parts.

 

 

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use USC's Icing. 2 part polyester, no shrinkage and it can be mixed in about any quantity you need. I started using this stuff on the 1:1 paint jobs. Tried it on the plastic and have never had a reason to use anything else. It sets up quick, sands easy and never so hard that it is impossible to sand. Works very well and I will recommend it to everyone.

used it on the '56 conversion with no worries of shrink back or difficult sanding.

Mark

usc-icing-finishing-putty.gif

100_1477-vi.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use USC's Icing. 2 part polyester, no shrinkage and it can be mixed in about any quantity you need. I started using this stuff on the 1:1 paint jobs.

Excellent stuff and my personal favorite for 1:1 work. However, it comes in a big tube, and if you're not using it on real-world cars to get it used up, my experience is that it will gradually dry out and thicken to the point of being a real PITA to use. I just don't use the stuff quick enough on only models to use it before it starts drying out.

That's the only reason I've switched to using the small modeler-size tubes of Bondo Professional 2-part polyester glazing putty for models.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

The Loctite Superglue Gel that Snake recommends works exceptionally well for filling edges of opening panels that need a tough and resilient fill that neither one-part lacquer putties OR Bondo-like two-part putties will give you. Neither of those products adhere well enough to edges, and they'll crack off or chip. The Loctite gel is there to stay, and can be filed and sanded for a perfect fit between parts.

 

 

Good point. I say "ask for it by name" because I've tried another couple types of superglue gel and none of them has worked half as well. I won't waste money on anything else anymore.

Also, I'd suggest starting to work it after no more than 24 hours. The more time passes, the harder it gets. It's best worked with files and/or sanding blocks with fresh 320 or even 280 as it is, at least to start.

I once had an older model airplane where the oleo V-strut on one landing gear leg was a short-shot and incomplete. I resculpted the thing with Loctite Gel and a toothpick, and did some final shaping with files and X-Acto, and would you believe I can't tell which of the gears on that model is real and which one I "made"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

While very experienced builders have responded, I'm sorta surprised that as a simple small filler, Tamiya white putty wasn't mentioned.

I also use the Bondo Spot Putty, the Tamiya stuff sands better/smoother.  It is very very cool stuff.

 

Edited by aurfalien

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

While very experienced builders have responded, I'm sorta surprised that as a simple small filler, Tamiya white putty wasn't mentioned.

I also use the Bondo Spot Putty, the Tamiya stuff sands better/smoother.  It is very very cool stuff.

 

The one part putties usually shrink way to much. I have never used the Tamiya (never had call to buy any) but I know the one part spot putties will shrink a lot when applied to thick. They also have tendency to attack the plastic and don't feather out as well as the two parts do. I have always used automotive based primers and paints and find the spot putties will also raise a bit when shot with a lacquer based primer. The epoxies don't attack it like lacquer but it has been an issue in my world.

And yes, Bill, you are right about the Icing getting a "bit" dry after a fashion. I use enough of it though that that isn't a problem for me. :) I wonder if USC would be open to suggestions to produce smaller "modeler" sized tubes... I think I will contact them and see what they say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3M Acryl Red.  Has a bit of a bite on bare plastic but I usually use it after primer.  Sometimes I like a bit of bite so I'll use it first.  Not for larger fills though and it does tend to shrink a little.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mark,

You bring up good points.

A few things I've done on my Chaparral CanAm car that is still on the bench in chronological order;

1) Built up fenders with Bondo Spot Putty.

2) Too much Bondo started eating styrene plus the Bondo started to crack.

3) Used super glue to re enforce styrene and stop the melt.

4) Started doing thinner layers of Bondo to build up fenders.

5) Top coat of Tamiya Putty as it sanded smoother then Bondo.

* I noticed that the Tamiya Putty was much friendlier on styrene then Bondo.

The pics of my Chap CanAm Spyder are on this forum some where.  I built up its fenders by about a 1/4" on each panel.  That's a lot of filler.

Edited by aurfalien

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my take on any one part putty ...

1/8" too thick (for shrinkage and melting styrene )

1/16" still too thick

1/32" might work

1/4" meltdown!

 

Tamiya Putty is one part but it's MADE for polystyrene, and too expensive and hard to find for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use 2-part putties and also 30 minute epoxy mixed with micro balloons. I can't say enough about this filler. No problems with shrinkage,ghosting or any ills. The micro balloons makes the mix easy to sand. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use 2-part putties and also 30 minute epoxy mixed with micro balloons. I can't say enough about this filler. No problems with shrinkage,ghosting or any ills. The micro balloons makes the mix easy to sand. 

 

Your Epoxy+Microballoons and very intriguing!

I take it you mix 3 parts Epoxy to 1 part Microballoon?

 

 

Edited by aurfalien

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, I have seen that everyone has already mentioned what I use with one exception.  I will start with a little discussion on purpose.  I like Eurosoft and Bondo as fillers because they go on thin, set quickly and grip plastic well.  I mention thin, because there is a difference in filling and building something up.  Filling to me, means covering scratches, gouges and seams.  The filler will work into all the small places and "fill" everything.  It should be thin so you can feather it out and not show a seam under paint.  They are somewhat porous, so once I am done with filling I use a little thin CA to seal them.  It helps them grip the plastic and harden them.

Building something up, like a hood scoop or Frenching lights, or flaring fenders is a different matter.  Because it is thicker, the chances of it shirking and cracking is much higher.  For that I like an AB putty aka epoxy putty.  Figure sculptors use it all the time to make their pieces.  It is a very much like clay to work with and has a fairly long open time to allow you to work it to shape.  Because it is epoxy, it cures very hard and can be sanded afterwards.  It also grips like crazy.  I use this stuff.  It takes some trial and error to learn how to use it, but the results are excellent.  Look up figure modeling on YouTube to see how it is used.

ab.jpg

Edited by Pete J.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bondo "Professional" (two-part) glazing/finishing putty. Comes in model-builder friendly small tube, relatively cheap, available at any auto parts store, works great. What's not to like?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...