Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

Airfix Jaguar XKR GT3 1:32


Funkychiken
 Share

Recommended Posts

Cant see anything outta place -looks outstanding! Q: did you have to re-etch any panel lines?, and do you recommend this kit?  I've been eyeballing these kits for some time, especially the Aston Martin DB5.

Dann... don't get your hopes up for the DB5. It's a whole different ball game, and very much worse.

There are five generations of Airfix 1/32 scale kits:

1950s: vintage cars, much like Revell Highway Pioneers. Most of the 1/32 vintage cars began at this time, and it shows.

1960s (1): "modern" cars (ie up to date when launched). Includes the DB5 and E-type that are still in the range. These moulds are mostly pretty tired now and fit and detailing are highly variable. Some of the more "ordinary" cars (Austin Maxi, Vauxhall Viva) have become quite collectable --  as well as the rarities like the Mercedes 280SL. The Triumph TR3 and Ford Escort have been out more recently as well. The best of the bunch (and pretty rare) is the Jaguar 420, which is very well detailed. The DB5 is long overdue for replacement.

1960s (2): racing cars, originally intended for adaptation to slot racing as well as scale models. Includes the Ferrari 250LM, Ford 3 Litre and Porsche 917. Good shapes, but simplified (virtually non-existent) interiors to leave room for motors etc.

1970s: a few, very high quality, vintage cars, including MG K3 Magnette, 1933 Alfa Romeo and Vauxhall Prince Henry. Very detailed, a bit fragile, but beautiful models when finished. Also "Monty's" Humber Snipe staff car, though that appeared in the military range.

2010s: Modern racing cars, sharing some heritage with new Scalextric toolings (since both brands were now under the Hornby umbrella) Includes the XKR GT3, Aston DBR9 (another great kit), Mini Countryman and Ford Fiesta WRC cars. Better interior detail than the earlier slot car derived tools, with simplified chassis, though.

Scalextric has just announced a new 3D-scanned E-type, so there's some hope that might lead to a new Airfix one, one day. Equally, Scalextric has HAD a brand new and very nice DB5 as a result of the 007 license since Skyfall came out, and there's no sign of that in an Airfix box...

bestest,

M.

Edited by Matt Bacon
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dann... don't get your hopes up for the DB5. It's a whole different ball game, and very much worse.

There are five generations of Airfix 1/32 scale kits:

1950s: vintage cars, much like Revell Highway Pioneers. Most of the 1/32 vintage cars began at this time, and it shows.

1960s (1): "modern" cars (ie up to date when launched). Includes the DB5 and E-type that are still in the range. These moulds are mostly pretty tired now and fit and detailing are highly variable. Some of the more "ordinary" cars (Austin Maxi, Vauxhall Viva) have become quite collectable --  as well as the rarities like the Mercedes 280SL. The Triumph TR3 and Ford Escort have been out more recently as well. The best of the bunch (and pretty rare) is the Jaguar 420, which is very well detailed. The DB5 is long overdue for replacement.

1960s (2): racing cars, originally intended for adaptation to slot racing as well as scale models. Includes the Ferrari 250LM, Ford 3 Litre and Porsche 917. Good shapes, but simplified (virtually non-existent) interiors to leave room for motors etc.

1970s: a few, very high quality, vintage cars, including MG K3 Magnette, 1933 Alfa Romeo and Vauxhall Prince Henry. Very detailed, a bit fragile, but beautiful models when finished. Also "Monty's" Humber Snipe staff car, though that appeared in the military range.

2010s: Modern racing cars, sharing some heritage with new Scalextric toolings (since both brands were now under the Hornby umbrella) Includes the XKR GT3, Aston DBR9 (another great kit), Mini Countryman and Ford Fiesta WRC cars. Better interior detail than the earlier slot car derived tools, with simplified chassis, though.

Scalextric has just announced a new 3D-scanned E-type, so there's some hope that might lead to a new Airfix one, one day. Equally, Scalextric has HAD a brand new and very nice DB5 as a result of the 007 license since Skyfall came out, and there's no sign of that in an Airfix box...

bestest,

M.

Thanx, Matt, I really appreciate you taking the time to give me this very informative response. I think I will try to get the Aston Martin DBR9. been wanting to build a car in this scale, and seeing yours told me that it could still look real. Again, thanx!, and fantastic job on yours!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the kind comments, and to clarify on some of the points raised:

1. Yes the kit went together well & was reasonably detailed

2. I didn't have to deepen the panel lines, and I used 3 coats of zero grey primer, several coats of Tamiya Gun Metal Grey & finished with Zero 2k clear. Most of the fit is perfect, infact the rear lights didn't fit due to the paint thickness, and the clearcoat cracked off when adding that detail. Some things like masking to paint the wheels was a pain, and the wheels & tyre wall are in 1 piece of plastic.

3. The original grill is a decal, you have to cut out the plastic plate on the chassis (that the decal would be applied to) in order to add some cut-out after market PE. it's a minor mod.

I have the Aston Martin DBR9 in the stash too, that's on the next up list!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...