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The Creative Explorer

Rodded 1937 Ford truck

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It has been a while since I build a hotrod, I believe it was the 1937 Ford Sedan build a couple years ago. So it was time for me to get started on one, I began the pickup a few months back, but didn't do anything but sanding the parts.
Deciding the direction was the hardest with this one, it is not a simple hotrod. I started with lowering the suspension and soon was also thinking of upgrading the engine. I decided to take one of my resin engines (428 Cobra Jet) and make that fit into the truck.
I am still in the 'development'-stage with this truck, but hopefully I can soon really start with this one.

 

 

Until I got satisfied and found that I was looking for.

 

The front axle drops in the engine-compartment, I need to fix that.

 

This is the flathead V8 that came with the kit, I wanted to go with it, but decided later to use one of my resin engines

But with the axle dropped in the framerails, it doesn't leave room for the engine.

 

 

 

 

 

This is the engine of choice; Ford 428 V8

 

 

Even though the engine is a little bit bigger, I think it will be a better fit.

 

 

I also opened up the sides of the hood, a bit classic hotrod style.

 

 

Because the gearbox is a lot bigger, some extra room was needed in the interior

 

 

Smoothed the sidesteps

 

And added some plastic to the rear of the frame, it will make it look beafier.

 

Smoothed the firepanel

 

And the cabine; I got rid of the driprail, hinges and doorhandles

 

The 428 Cobra Jet intake manifold, not the one I think I will going to use.

 

The interior is one piece molded tub, it makes it more difficult to paint and detail, so...

 

I cut it up for more convenience

 

The holes in the fenders got filled, I will not be using the bumpers and than those holes look silly and rod unworthy.

 

Also started to patch some new plastic in the interior

 

The fenders are starting to look a lot better

 

Still working on the interior tub

 

Back of the frame is almost done

 

And I finally found an awesome manifold for the project, I think it came for a C3 corvette, but I am not sure, it will be adjusted and made to fit the 428, giving the Ford 4 2-barrel carb's!

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I love this kit-a lot of potential.

nice progress-look forward to more 

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This is a very good kit for a Hot Rod. I built one a couple of years ago and I might be able to offer some of the things I did on the suspension and engine. You mentioned that you lowered the front and that the front axle now hits the frame. There are several ways to lower this truck. If you are staying with the kits front I Beam what I did was to modify it to make a "Dropped Axle". Using the kit part I cut the axel just outside of the mounting point for the front radius arms and created a section of new material that I would then attach the spindles to in a raised position. This way the center section of the axel  remains in the normal position and you have created a Drop Axle. This is how most where lowered in days of old. This also gives you more Oil Pan clearance for a late model engine. The oil pan may still not clear. You could either cut and alter the oil pan or do as I have and cheat and use the Flat Head oil pan. The fire wall will need some more work to clear the newer engine. The foot wells may have to be cut and reshaped. For motor mounts you can use some round or angle shaped plastic. Great job on fixing the front fenders.     

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Thank you guys, and I hope it will work out they I want to! I want it to be clean and stylish and dare I say it'a hint of elegance :-)

This is a very good kit for a Hot Rod. I built one a couple of years ago and I might be able to offer some of the things I did on the suspension and engine. You mentioned that you lowered the front and that the front axle now hits the frame. There are several ways to lower this truck. If you are staying with the kits front I Beam what I did was to modify it to make a "Dropped Axle". Using the kit part I cut the axel just outside of the mounting point for the front radius arms and created a section of new material that I would then attach the spindles to in a raised position. This way the center section of the axel  remains in the normal position and you have created a Drop Axle. This is how most where lowered in days of old. This also gives you more Oil Pan clearance for a late model engine. The oil pan may still not clear. You could either cut and alter the oil pan or do as I have and cheat and use the Flat Head oil pan. The fire wall will need some more work to clear the newer engine. The foot wells may have to be cut and reshaped. For motor mounts you can use some round or angle shaped plastic. Great job on fixing the front fenders.     

Thank you Espo,

 

I did made a fix for me yesterday; unfortunately before you posted yours, I cut some holes in the frames, lowered the I-beam into the frame, until I got the desired height (as low as I could get the tires in the fenders haha) and glued them together. Then I cut up the I-beam, making a independent front suspension, giving me the needed clearance for the oilpan.

It is still very rough, but I need to work on it some more.

As it looks now; I think the firewall can be the way it was, but I did had to cut up the floorboard for some clearance for the longer gearbox. It will be all a tight fit, but it seems to work out.

For now I am back to the '65 Corvette, I have to pick up a can of paint and start finishing that big boy. Then I can go back to the '37.

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The independent suspension was the other method that I was going to mention. The problem I also ran into was when I  changed the front cross member to allow the leaf spring mount to sit higher up into the frame. When this was done on the 1:1 Fords the front radius arms would be "split"  and they would then be remounted on the side of the frame instead of the center. Otherwise with the lower front mounting point the radius arms would rest on the frame and not allow any suspension movement. Glade to see you solved your suspension problems and the independent suspension would ride and handle much better in the 1:1 prototype.  

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The independent suspension was the other method that I was going to mention. The problem I also ran into was when I  changed the front cross member to allow the leaf spring mount to sit higher up into the frame. When this was done on the 1:1 Fords the front radius arms would be "split"  and they would then be remounted on the side of the frame instead of the center. Otherwise with the lower front mounting point the radius arms would rest on the frame and not allow any suspension movement. Glade to see you solved your suspension problems and the independent suspension would ride and handle much better in the 1:1 prototype.  

Thanks David, I think I did the way it was suppose to. However, I did mount them in the framerails, but that was done for strengthpurposes. I will try to mask it in the end, but on the side of the frame would be to weak I think.

 

The only 'big' issue I have that I haven't really decided on, are the tyres, I do want to keep the original look as much as possible and make them into a whitewall. But I am not sure whether they are wide enough for the rodding style. I don't want very wide tyres, so I am in doubt where to go.

 

@Modelcarjedi; you are correct; they are such a nice canvas, and a nice change from the '32 Ford.

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One thing I did on my build was to use tires with different outside diameter, sometimes called a "rubber rack". You might dig around in your spare parts to see if you have tires that match the look you're after on the sidewall of the tire but are different diameters. The ones I used were black walls so that part was much easier for me. I don't know what kind of access you have to the AMT after market tires, they offer two sets of different size tires in both wide whites and narrow white wall tires.   

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You mean in a smaller diameter? That might actually be a good idea, I will look into that. Thanks.

Oh; basically no acces to aftermarket stuff at the moment. Got laid off a couple months back and family is now financially prio1.

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