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bbowser

best brass finish?

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I'm working on a '14 Model T fire car and none of the kit parts are plated (the new ICM kit).  I'm looking for opinions on the best way to replicate the shiny brass parts such as the radiator shell and headlights.  Thanks in advance!

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Rub N Buff comes in Gold, and I think perhaps Brass as well. The stuff can work pretty well on small parts, once you get the hang of using it.

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I'm working on a '14 Model T fire car and none of the kit parts are plated (the new ICM kit).  I'm looking for opinions on the best way to replicate the shiny brass parts such as the radiator shell and headlights.  Thanks in advance!

You can also use Bare Metal Foil, then paint over it with Tamiya's Clear Yellow--show field bright and shiny!

Art

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You can also use Bare Metal Foil, then paint over it with Tamiya's Clear Yellow--show field bright and shiny!

Art

Bruce, if you do a Google Image Search for 1914 Model T Ford (I just did!), you will notice that at some point in 1913, the headlights went from all brass construction to a black painted "body", with the rim around the lens and that blocky-looking "chimney" on top being polished brass--that would be so very easy to do in BMF, then painted with Tamiya clear yellow.  I did some foil work on my ICM '13 T and then painted that with Clear Yellow--looks like polished brass to me!

Art

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Alclad makes a "Polished Brass" as well as a "Pale Gold".

I've used the pale gold many times for items like carbs or '60s Mopar air cleaners, but I've never worried much about a super shiny base coat.

This is the Alclad PolIshed Brass.

 

Steve

 

3.jpg

Am I going to wind up in prison for "copying without permission"? :blink:

 

Steve

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I just had a thought, what about adding a yellow to the new molotow chrome pen ink. That might make some shiny brass. I don't have there yellow but do have some of thier colored pens I will try mixing.

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Bruce, if you do a Google Image Search for 1914 Model T Ford (I just did!), you will notice that at some point in 1913, the headlights went from all brass construction to a black painted "body", with the rim around the lens and that blocky-looking "chimney" on top being polished brass--that would be so very easy to do in BMF, then painted with Tamiya clear yellow.  I did some foil work on my ICM '13 T and then painted that with Clear Yellow--looks like polished brass to me!

Art

Thanks Art!  On a related question, when did they go from white to black rubber tires?  I'm thinking of coloring the white tires in the kit, mostly because I think it will look better with black.

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if you pull up some Of Harry's brass-era builds, and his old fire engine, you'll see his method for doing brass.

Edited by Ace-Garageguy

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Thanks Art!  On a related question, when did they go from white to black rubber tires?  I'm thinking of coloring the white tires in the kit, mostly because I think it will look better with black.

For starters, as I've pointed out numerous times--those early tires were never truly white, but rather a "buff" color when new.  In late 1913-early 1914,  several rubber companies began adding carbon black powder to their raw latex rubber before vulcanizing, finding that doing this greatly extended tire life, and made a stronger tire in the bargain.

Art

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For starters, as I've pointed out numerous times--those early tires were never truly white, but rather a "buff" color when new.  In late 1913-early 1914,  several rubber companies began adding carbon black powder to their raw latex rubber before vulcanizing, finding that doing this greatly extended tire life, and made a stronger tire in the bargain.

Art

Bear in mind though:  Those pre-WW-II natural rubber tires were never pure black in color, but rather a VERY dark charcoal gray!   (carbon black powder added to cream-colored natural rubber makes dark grey, not black).

Art

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