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A Drill for General Model Work Recommendation

18 posts in this topic

Posted

 I bought a chuck that would fit into an electric screwdriver some time back hoping that would provide a better method drilling. It worked OK but didn't run fast enough. I had been to Harbor Freight recently and bought a 18 volt drill. 

https://www.harborfreight.com/18-Volt-38-in-Cordless-DrillDriver-With-Keyless-Chuck-21-Clutch-Settings-69651.html

What I really like about this drill is the nice progressive feel of the drill. A little pressure and it rotated slowly. A little more pressure and it speeds up without a huge jump in RPMs. Very controllable. No affiliation or financial interest. I bought the drill/light combo but the drill alone is on sale with a Harbor Freight coupon for $16.99. The light works pretty good too.

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Posted

Tom, I bought a woodcarvers drill from Harbour Freight a few years ago.   I love it because it has the powerhead and a flexible shaft with foot pedal to control the speed.

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Posted

I purchased this from Amazon.com, works great. 

Tamiya 74041 Electric Handy Drill31kkWCKDHSL.jpg

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Posted

What are you doing that requires a power drill for styrene? I've never needed more than a pin vice.

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Posted

I like the Dremel battery drills.

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Posted

I have and love the Dremel stylus drill.It has variable speeds,is cordless and fits my hand very well.It also uses all the various dremel  accessories that I need for grinding and rough finish work.Righly recommended tool.

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Posted

Agreed on the Stylus.  Why did Dremel stop making it?

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Posted

What are you doing that requires a power drill for styrene? I've never needed more than a pin vice.

Ditto!

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Posted

What are you doing that requires a power drill for styrene? I've never needed more than a pin vice.

Ditto!

Same here!

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Posted

I use my little 4.8v Dremel for drilling the heads for spark plug wires & distributor, throttle linkage & fuel lines, and other little holes.  I use a #70 drill bit.

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Posted (edited)

I have to chuckle at the comments about not needing a power drill. I suspect that those folks will, on occasion, use a Dremel. 

I posted a tutorial (A handy accessory) on using a power drill as a lathe, tire-treatment too, etc. and without that drill cradle, a lot of accuracy (and time) would be lost. Unfortunately, Photobucket is applying their extortion to me (as well as everybody else) and the pictures don't show.

Keep on truckin' Miatatom!

Edited by BigTallDad

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Posted

I have to chuckle at the comments about not needing a power drill. I suspect that those folks will, on occasion, use a Dremel. 

I posted a tutorial (A handy accessory) on using a power drill as a lathe, tire-treatment too, etc. and without that drill cradle, a lot of accuracy (and time) would be lost. Unfortunately, Photobucket is applying their extortion to me (as well as everybody else) and the pictures don't show.

Keep on truckin' Miatatom!

I use a Dremel minimally for grinding or cutting, not for drilling a tiny hole. 

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Posted

I use a Dremel minimally for grinding or cutting, not for drilling a tiny hole. 

Perhaps the OP has arthritis or (hopefully not) missing fingers.

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Posted

Dremel, and no doubt other manufacturers, have 3 jaw chucks available that will fit the Dremels and similar tools. The one I have didn't work on my Stylus, but it does on my bigger corded and cordless tools. Dremel says theirs will do 1/32" to 1/8" shanks, but it seems to me mine goes a little larger. I do use my Dremels for things other than plastic, too. 

https://www.dremel.com/en_US/products/-/show-product/accessories/4486-dremel-chuck

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Posted

I've always used a pin vise and will continue to use one to get the drill started in the right place - but many times I wished I had a mini power drill to save my finger tips - My dremel is too big  for fine work. -  I'm going to have to check these out. - thanks for the tips

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Posted

Love my  Tamiya and I recomend  it .

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Posted

I have to chuckle at the comments about not needing a power drill. I suspect that those folks will, on occasion, use a Dremel. 

Keep on truckin' Miatatom!

Perhaps the OP has arthritis or (hopefully not) missing fingers.

No, BTD, I've still got all 10 of them but at 73, dexterity and just generally shaky hands make it hard to use pin vices. I've found that the drill from Harbor Freight is a relatively light, easy to use piece. And, as I originally stated, the feel on the trigger is really nice and graduated. Makes pinning tiny pieces really easy. That was the big reason but scuffing slicks and race tires is also easy to do in a chuck I made to hold tires. 

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Posted

I have a dremel but at Harbor Freight the other day I bought a mini drill, like a dremel, for $6.99. It is walwart powered and it came with a bunch of bits, sanding , polishing and lots of small grinding bits. I usually use a finger drill but thought for $6.99 I can't afford not to get it. It does work good but will probably just use it for the grinding part. I usually build stock box so the drilling parts don't get used much. It also had 3 or 4 collets for the different sizes needed.

Richard

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