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1:18 ACME/GL '68 Shelby Racing Co. Trans Am Mustang revised


19 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Greetings,

This thread relates to possible things to do with regards to the 1:18 Greenlight 1967-68 Mustang SCCA Trans Am Mustang 'Tribute' range, containing what insights I can provide to replicate what is seen.  Much thanks is expressed to 'Oldtimer' for without whom this project would not be possible.  

ACME_Mustang_one.thumb.jpg.d84ea886bef2e

...this would be the unmodified 'as-delivered' version, largely impressionistic for being a tribute version, although nicely finished especially for paint.

Titus_Watkins_Glen_one.thumb.jpg.b216b55

...this would be Jerry Titus motoring along sometime during the middle to late '68 SCCA Trans Am season.  For Shelby Racing Co. it was an 'explosive' year...

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_two_003.thumb.JP

...seen are old GMP Trans Am tires from their Penske Camaro range, combined with cast resin clones of the ACME 1:18th '65 Dodge altered wheelbase American Racing Torque Thrust rear wheels less outer lip and inner rim structure.  Old GMP Trans Am Minilites were cut up to provide fodder for a mold to reproduce the inner rims seen at left, whereas Pegasus 1:25th scale turned aluminum 22 inch rim blanks were cut down by hand to afford usable turned aluminum outer wheel lips.  The handcast GMP brake discs seen were not used, with chromed washers substituted in for reasoned brake disc detail.

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_four_013.thumb.J

...though far from finished, this would be the chassis less cast-in stamped fuel tank detail.  The oil pan is a modified Hwy. 61 BOSS 302 item with added sump in the Aviad style, whereas the fuel cell housing is scratch built.  A Welly Watts linkage assembly is seen just below, as are a pair of over rider traction bars also from the Welly tool.  A Kar Kraft Watts linkage support structure will be fabricated and added soon.  Know that the new ACME Mustang comes with '67 interior panels, hence '68 versions from an earlier release will be substituted.  Ride height has been lowered front and rear, while old GMP Trans Am Torque Thrust wheel hubs have been cut and reemployed to attach to discreetly trimmed ACME/Greenlight hubs from an earlier release (it seems they were tooled a bit larger than what comes through on the most recent releases).  

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_nine_001.thumb.J

...these would be scratch built headlamp filler panels specific to the '68 factory cars.  Yes - the one on the left looks a bit better for profile...

 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_eight_011.thumb.

...seen is a smaller, slightly tapered fuel fill dimple situated on the tail panel as well as a hand formed overlay where the bumper would otherwise be situated.  The lower valence stands to be replaced with a plugged (less GT exhaust tip cut outs) and shaved (for the licence plate in particular) version more suited to this application.  Note too the fuel cell housing hanging down...

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_eight_014.thumb.

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_eight_015.thumb.

...with wheels installed and with a cast resin fuel inlet attached to the deck lid.  Notice too that the 'Shelby Racing Co.' and 'TA' lettering has been removed.  Although common enough on the early season cars, when the revised corporate blue liveries were debuted mid-season, such identification was left by the wayside.  Thanks for reviewing this initial post - more to come.

Mike K.

 

 

Edited by swede70

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Posted

As usual Mike, you are not a customizer, you are an artisan working in a scale model world.

To date, my daliance with this model has been to solely swap the racing components contained in the recent Gurney version to the three other Greenlight "Tribute" Trans Am Mustangs.

IMG_20170519_183832_zpseescdyo2.jpg  IMG_20170519_183840_zpsv7tqpz7z.jpg

IMG_20170520_142422_zpsahgsnxsh.jpg  IMG_20170513_120333_hdr_zpsqxgn9kpo.jpg

Clearly, mine will only pass the 10 feet away test; yours, however will pass Tech Inspection at the next SVRA race weekend.

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Posted (edited)

Greetings,

Jim's labors will surely pass tech. at most any vintage event - have no fear in this regard!  Again, my considerable thanks to you for your considerable generosity.  Minor things to report in the form of my adding the unusual sun screen seen at select '68 Trans Am events on the Shelby Racing Co. Mustangs that seemed uniform for tint top-to-bottom, but only stretched about 2/3rds the way across the upmost portion of the windshield. 

Efforts to apply both Testor's and Tamiya aerosol black tint directly to the model windshield ended badly for inconsistent radius of the tape, puddling of the products sprayed along the masking edges, as well as seepage under what otherwise seemed to be a sound effort to mask things tightly.  Eventually some Testor's clear decal film was purchased and sprayed evenly with the Tamiya product, then clear coated with Testor's decal bonder.  A pattern was taken regarding the radius of the top of the windshield proper, and when dry the decal film was cut to shape before applying.  Regrettably it appears that the whole effort took mere minutes when in point of fact it took much more!  It looks clean though, even as the trouble to replicate the spec. isn't easily grasped just for looking at it. 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_forteeen_002.thu

...the model seen with a sheet of the black-tinted clear film, plus top windshield radius pattern.

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_forteeen_003.thu

...still hard to make out this, but the finished tint segment is in place across the top of the windshield.  A slightly better fitting right side headlamp fill panel has been substituted in - whoopee this!  Note that the driver's side mirror has been removed as has the antenna base otherwise present atop the passenger's side fender.  Wholly invisible is an otherwise standard GT steering wheel drilled out for spoke holes and painted black to roughly mimic a Grant period racing model.  So much inside is or will be painted a rather lusterless black that the ambiance of such is akin to a tomb...

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_eleven_006.thumb

...and here would be a set of earlier-issue Greenlight standard '68 door panels with the armrests filed out and fill panels fabricated and blended in.  Also seen is a small square pad further noted within the reference photo seen here. 

Nikon_nine_006.thumb.JPG.67a64437576f426

...coming soon then.  This would be a largely scratch built front valence assembly that may (or may not) be used on the late '68 entry seen above, but certainly will feature on any early '68 entry with full factory flare work.  I started with a sawed-off front valance plugged up for holes and reproduced in resin.  The time will soon come when I'll opt to reproduce this for use across other projects besides.  Thanks for examining this update...

Mike K.

 

 

Edited by swede70

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Posted (edited)

Greetings,

Seen below will be the interior taking shape, combining the trim less rear seat pads with the bare 'stamped steel' detail otherwise found on the Welly Trans Am Mustang series noticeable here for wearing a silver finish.  The main hoop of the roll cage has been fabricated, whereas after siting a Lane '68 Shelby GT350 Mustang dashboard off of the firewall, I should have the dimensions of the rest of the cage effectively locked in. The wheels and tires, to speak little of the engine and transmission seen here, simply reflect the stock 1:18th diecast offerings and stand to be replaced outright. 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_seventeen_003.th

...also included is an old Aviaid oil pan decal useful for the purposes of reducing in scale and adding to the later-season oil pan soon to be finished.  A chrome finish paint will be used to replicate the bright finish Aviaid then employed and still employs. 

Aviad_oil_pan_decal.thumb.jpg.914e83a89a

...thanks for skimming this most recent update.

 

Mike K. 

Edited by swede70

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Posted (edited)

Great stuff, as usual, Mike!

I've been kit-bashing my Maier version, played with it a little bit over the past couple of days.  Added a battery and cables to the trunk, and a rudimentary fuel cell (one of the drag versions you see on eBay occasionally), and added a fuel vent and filler tube out to the standard Greenlight outlet, and also a fuel line.

IMG_20170711_184913_zpsn9beoaug.jpg  IMG_20170711_184743_zpsnbuwpgff.jpg

I like your back seat idea, need to look closer at mine (hadn't even thought of it).  Looks like you cut off the interior behind the roll bar?

Keep it coming!

Edited by ibj40
Added Pictures

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Posted (edited)

Very nice work ibj40 - I really like the discreet vent detail too...

Yes, all I did was chop the standard Greenlight/ACME floor just forward of the main roll hoop mounts.  Efforts to set new roll cage elements looking back met with grief last evening for the parts were so difficult to accurately size and place, so I'll likely end up drilling right through the insert to guide tubing straight through for better control of my work.  The same will be done with the bars leading from the top of the main hoop through towards the trunk area; i.e. I imagine the way it should be!  More model car 'mission creep' of which I am famous for. 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_sixteen_001.thum

...although mostly a white blur, this would be the chassis prior to substituting in the Welly Trans Am Mustang interior element.  GIven the glass comes out of the ACME Mustang without too much trouble, here I'll use it as a guide to establish the evolving dimensions of the forward members of the roll cage with less risk of damaging it for manipulating the diecast body on and off it repeatedly.  Also seen is a 1:18th Lane '68 Shelby Mustang dashboard (work here is incomplete) and a Welly Trans Am Mustang Grant steering wheel slated to go in.  Hopefully I can cast the steering wheel so a ready supply will always be on call.

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_eighteen_004.thu

...this would be the support structure employed to situate the dash to the body.  Setting it back isn't so hard, but rather elevating it and setting it on the right angle versus the dismal siting of the standard Greenlight/ACME panel is the chore here.  More structure will be added to ensure that the dash effectively hangs off of the firewall and independently from the body proper.

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_eighteen_002.thu

...happily, no clearance issues to report.  If all goes well, I'll soon have the dash suspended from the firewall and be ready to fabricate further elements of the roll cage.

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_eighteen_003.thu

...not perfection really, but note the removal of the battery and windshield washer solvent bottle otherwise cast-in to the inner fenders.  Though hard to see, brackets have been fabricated to situate the strengthening brace across the suspension turrets.  Perhaps I should go back and create a proper battery cut out and tray?  Tamiya semi-gloss black works well as a slightly dingy chassis black as seen here.

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_thirteen_009.thu

...and finally, the definitive answer on where to display the otherwise lonely Shelby Racing Co. Toyota 2000 GT I happen to have.  The models were observed chatting late into the night about opportunities lost in '68...

 

Mike K.

 

 

 

Edited by swede70

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Posted (edited)

Greetings,

A modest update then...

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_twenty_001.thumb

...things can look a bit better underneath for removal of the product identification back of the torque boxes on either side.  A body shop sanding block was helpful here.

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_twenty_003.thumb

...first time in primer, this would be a modified 1:18th Greenlight '68 Mustang shell with appropriate flare work added front and rear.  The rocker panel trim overlay was further bonded onto the shell and smoothed, panel lines were cut for the fenders looking forward, while a small line was etched between the quarter panel and the rocker panel on each side.  Know that I hope to do an earlier season '68 Shelby Racing Co. entry in the more vivid of the two yellows employed that year so that in the end I'll have two '67 team cars as well as two '68 renditions. 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_twenty_002.thumb

...notice too the mildly indented rear side indicator detail, not installed but rather plugged in. 

1968_Kwech_Mustang.thumb.jpg.33e6d482b8b

...hard to tell if this is the slightly more vibrant shade of yellow as described, but akin to what I desire to replicate.  Note the roll hoop mounted signalling lamp akin to what was later used in '69 and in '70 on the AAR 'Cudas.  I believe the venue here is '68 Bryar, NH.

1968 Titus Mustang.jpg

...Titus at speed, this certainly being the shade I hint at, the venue being Bridgehampton, NY. slightly later in the season.  Thanks for reviewing this update...

Mike K.

Edited by swede70

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Posted

Keep it going MIke!

Jim

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Posted (edited)

Greetings,

Another small update here:  

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_twenty_four_001.

...at least two of these decals are needed per '67 car, located forward of the wheel arch on the front fender in '67.  The '68 Shelby Racing Co. decal is of a different design, while someone on another board has kindly come through with information concerning the look and dimensions of such. 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_twenty_three_002

...here is seen a fuel inlet cutout on the deck lid of the soon-to-be yellow '68.  I ended up fixing fast the panel to a few panels of cardboard with lengths of duct tape so both hands could control the drill, whereas a small segment of the same tape was used right where I'd drill through to ensure the bit wouldn't skip about and thus mar the surface.  The rest was simply done with files and a coil or two of sandpaper...

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_twenty_two_009.t

...very difficult to photograph well, this is the body in paint.  Yes - this model will sit lower than the blue '68.  At this point it seems likely that the project will gobble up at least four or five cans of Tamiya aerosol, hence not a cheap endeavor.  I later went back and subtly redid the panel line formed between the quarter panel and the rocker just behind each door, trying if you will to come up more with a welded panel line versus an inelegant razor saw cut line. Also, it was discovered that gaps existed between the blended in rocker panels and the door jams/inner rocker panels, and given applying extra paint via spraying was only so effective, I ended up applying paint via a brush prior to applying an overcoat of same work to disguise the effort.  It's not terrible in sum.  Thanks for skimming this update.  

Mike K.

 

 

 

 

Edited by swede70

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Posted

Hey Mike!

Little bit of a hijack, but fooling around with a GMP Trans Am Camaro chassis, and an Ertl 1970 Camaro body.

Looks promising!

IMG_20170730_190736_zpsujk15vd0.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Greetings,

Pretty good stuff - I envy the foresight you demonstrated for scooping up multiples of the GMP Todco '69 Camaro to facilitate such projects in particular.  I remember you'd also tried a marriage between the Road Legends/Yat Ming '69 Firebird Trans Am - another unlikely pairing that also worked out unexpectedly well.  Thanks for sharing. 

-

Some scattered work then, although some reverses to report too...

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_twenty_five_005.

...seen are all the roll cage tubes back of the main hoop taking shape.  I ended up drilling through the fabricated bulkhead as well as the Welly floor section insert so that judging the length of the actual tubes as well as the angles where they touch the panels prior to gluing wasn't so critical.  Though hard to see, a pair of tubes continue on into the trunk area where a cast resin fuel cell is situated.

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_twenty_six_003.t

...sorry - fuzzy as all get out this image.  This would be a modified Hwy. 61 BOSS 302 oil pan with the addition of a scratch built sump in the style of the Aviaid pan visible upon a pair of Tunnel Port 302's in a pit lane photo found in the new Lipetz Trans Am Era book.  Early season photos demonstrate that a cast aluminum Cobra pan was employed.  A third design was said to be used employing exterior drainbacks, although this I've not seen. 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_twenty_nine_001.1968_Titus_Mustang_late_twenty_nine_008.

...this would be the hood black out applied, while notice too how the entire headlamp bucket is painted akin to the smaller J. Titus image seen earlier in this thread.  Masking proved problematic until I decided to apply Tamiya tape to another shell and cut the same with an Xacto knife smoothly across the recess formed between the bucket and the fender proper.  Once I cut the masking, I simply transferred the remaining bit to the painted shell prior to spraying.  Headlamp bucket fill panels are difficult to make out here, although they look nice for being well shaped.  Also note the revised 'rubber' seal around the fuel cell inlet. 

All appeared good until this point - that is until I basically wrecked the paint on the top of the model for clumsy handling and slipshod masking of the stripe work to come.  Doubts also exist as to the veracity of the shade of yellow used, hence I'm going to salvage matters best I can.  At first I felt gutted for my mistake, but I suppose that the use of a rather thin primer as well as thin Tamiya color coats makes matters less dire than initially feared. 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_thirty_005.thumb

...for near endless review of exterior photos in-period, I'm still convinced that for select races that the paler '67 shade of yellow was substituted for Special Yellow WT6066 which has a slightly greater punch while also appearing a touch pale in certain light and for certain so-so period color processes.  A mid-year offering hinting of more vibrant Grabber colors to come later in the era, perhaps this accounts for the variations seen in body hue that really don't factor across so many reasoned 1967 images inspected?  I think I'm on my own making the WT6066 leap per se, but at present it makes sense to me.  Thanks to the kindness of area authority Phil Jacobs, the identity of the shade used in '67 and beyond was learned, whereas I'll revise this post and record such here. 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_thirty_001.thumb

...and finally the next set of wheels taking shape.  I failed to properly wire brush the top right example, hence distracting flash is noticed.  MM magnesium with a dusting of Tamiya Pearlescent Clear seems the best way to go here.  New aluminum outer rings to come.  Thanks for reviewing this update...

Mike K.

Edited by swede70

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Posted

Yat Ming Firebird Trans Am is in the background. Got my one "mule" chassis in play; replacement GMP Trans Am Camaros are starting to get a little pricey.

I just wish I had the patience and talent to create the details you produce. 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hello again,

After sanding down the finish errors present along the top surfaces of the model, I resprayed the work in a slightly lighter Tamiya lacquer aerosol as seen here.  Noticed is a ride height/track mock up using standard GMP ARE Torque Thrust wheels which will be replaced with wheels almost identical to those used on the later-season blue #2 Mustang.   If it might help others, included below is a scan of the '68 Shelby Racing Co. decal that appears mostly as a blur either on the quarter panel of the cars early season, or positioned on the C-pillar when the cars were painted yellow.  Kind thanks to Phil Jacobs for sourcing this rare artwork.  Pressing ahead again then...

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_thirty_four_013.Shelby_Racing_Co._1968_decal_as_scanned.

Mike K.

 

Edited by swede70

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Posted (edited)

...more of the same, with revised wheels employing Pegasus aluminum sleeves - albeit not the 'stepped' variety which has been discontinued by the manufacturer.  The 'stepped sleeve' product afforded a better contour at the edge of the rim lip, but alas, one can't have everything available in perpetuity.  If you should have trouble with the www.pegasushobbies.com website, know that it has been superseded by www.pegasushobbies.net which will allow online ordering of product. 

My choice of color still appears a bit too strong, hence pondering the revision of another shell plus flares given that stripping lacquer would also entail ruining what delicate resin and putty work went into capturing what is seen below.  At the very least I wouldn't be tossing away the proverbial 'bird in hand' if I started anew independent of that which I've worked up.  Thanks for reviewing this post...

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_thirty_seven_rev1968_Titus_Mustang_late_thirty_seven_rev

Mike K.

Edited by swede70

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Posted

Keep plugging away, Mike!  I love watching your process.

Let me know if you need another donor body, I think I have a spare Gurney.

 

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Posted (edited)

Greetings and thanks for the kind feedback...

Although unpleasantly laborious, a new shell with new flares has largely been worked up - kind thanks to ibj40/Jim F. for all the valued assistance and support (i.e. I'm still using up what I have!).  Other modest things to report as well:

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_thirty_eight_002

...this would be an attempt at door roundels w/black outline border plus door driver identification (Ariel font, 14 size if I accurately recall).  Believe or not, I just used a black Sharpie pen and a stencil set to get the outline, although it's best to carefully seal such with the decal bonder in a can as illustrated; i.e. apply the stuff too heavily and the marker runs.  I haven't determined how to best cut the images out cleanly, whereas I'm thinking of applying different varieties of Tamiya white to insure that the resulting roundels are as vibrant as they can be prior to application onto the work much like any other waterslide decal. 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_thirty_nine_001.

...this would be the stuff of my flares in a particularly raw state.  Some time ago I began upon a 1:18th scale Hwy. 61-based 1970 Autodynamics Trans Am Dodge Challenger, and had the foresight to copy what I'd worked up for the use of urethane molds to backstop my efforts.  The copies seen above look a bit pudgy, although I've found it easier to remove material to arrive at a proper shape versus adding material later and struggling thus. 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_thirty_nine_002.

...much thinned here, and quite substantially recontoured and reshaped.  If only the movement of your mouse reflected how much time was spent to proceed from point A to point B!

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_forty_001.thumb.

...ignore the '68 Daytona 24HR image for the front flares aren't really in the final configuration!  Here is seen the heavily reworked front flares in position within filed cutouts on the body proper.  Note how the fender opening contour blends easily into the flares both towards the front and terminating towards the end of flare as it blends back into the fender.  And yes, the front valence has been cut out entirely - a nasty business given I did this by hand with a simple razor saw over two days.  Lastly, the clumsily rendered B-pillars and associated cast-in weather sealing have been filed off complete, faintly noticeable for the clean finish of the surfaces just below the roof edges as seen here. 

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_forty_002.thumb.1968_Titus_Mustang_late_forty_003.thumb.

...the flares in place with white craft glue only.  Seeking a risk-free paint test platform, the reader will notice the otherwise odd hood black out treatment as well as the stripework witnessed across the top of the vehicle.  The normal rice paper Tamiya masking tape is great stuff, although I have reservations about the use of the fineline tape that they also produce that didn't quite seal as well.  Notice too the removal of the raised rear side indicator detail on either side, later to be partially puttied in so that the same will appear as a soft, filled and reflector-shaped indentation on the panel work

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_forty_004.thumb.

...and finally viewed across the top.  The hood roundel represents another test of material and will soon vanish as the shell is media blasted.  Some room for adjustment is had for the flares can be adjusted in and out for either swinging in or out from the top prior to contour matching the outer lip to the fender surfaces.  And finally, I may drill out windshield wiper mount holes for they seem to be missing on later Greenlight Trans Am releases. Thanks for examining this most recent update. 

 

Mike K.

Edited by swede70

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Posted

You are the King, Mike.

I love to watch the updates.

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Posted (edited)

A small update then...

This would be the second shell returned from the media blaster and outfitted with the thinned flares seen above.  The dimensions between the flares and the body shell cutouts up front are a bit tighter, while the rocker panel inserts stand to be blended in with greater care soon.  Thanks...

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_forty_one_003.th

1968_Titus_Mustang_late_forty_one_004.th

Mike K.

 

Edited by swede70

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Posted

Mike, I don't think the real cars were subject to as much effort as you put into them.

Great work, as usual!

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