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cars1206

how to paint die cast?

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  Hi Everyone.    I bought my first diecast yesterday and I want to paint it a different color. Can the paint be stripped with Purple Power degreaser or pine sol?  Will Plasti coat primer work?  Then repaint as usual?  Any advice would be appreciated.  Thanks

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Hi Micheal, I use spray on paint stripper, leave it sit for about a half an hour then hose it off, sometimes it may take a couple times to get some stubborn areas. Seams, etc I hit with a fine wire brush, file any mold lines, then I go over the body with some 0000 steel wool, wash it and let it dry overnight. I use regular automotive primer on mine and then paint it. I've not had any issues doing it this way. You just need to make sure all the stripper residue is off the parts and cleaned well or it'll come back to haunt you. I also bake my paint on to make it more durable. I go it at 170 for about an hour. Now that's just my way, I'm sure there are several others. Good luck and show us some pics. Have a great 4th. Geno.:)

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Michael, I have used Kleen strip brand paint stripper for many years, it works on stripping paint almost instantly. I would warn you to follow the precautions on the can as it is caustic, and will harm plastic parts. Some Guys don't strip a car for repaint, but will sand the existing paint to prep it for a new color. It is important to mention that the paint on doors, hood, etc around the opening edges can be very thick from the factory paint, and should be sanded a bit to reduce the thickness to prepare for your coat of paint to reduce the chances of chipping the paint when you open these features.   

DSCN0974.JPG

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Any good stripper will work well. If you hit the model with some coarse ScotchBrite before applying the stripper that will open the paint up and let the stripper work better/quicker. Be very sure to wash the car afterwards to remove ALL of the stripper residue. :)

PlastiKote Grey or DuPont's Sandable grey primer/surfacer will do you well for getting the car ready for new paint.

Mark

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I just did this.  Actually am still doing it.  I use whatever the purple stuff is at Lowe's in a gallon ice cream bucket.  Dropped the car in, poured enugh stuff over to cover it and let it sit.  First few hours, nothing.   Second day, starting to come up.  By third day, paint was bubbling up nicely.  Pulled car out and put chisel blade in knife handle.  Started lifting paint.  In about an hour it was mostly done.  As you're holding it, it dries.  May need to wet the car as you're working.  Screp and lif the paint.  Carefully so as not to gouge the paint.   Wear gloves - the purple stuff is not friendly to my hands - dires them out and feels weird.  

The hood paint peeled off like a decal.  It's a 1/24 or 25 Maverick.  And under the thick paint is some nice detail.  All the window frames are there.   They disappear under whatever paint the factory globs on.  The solvent-y stuff would have been quicker, but I can use purple stuff indoors.  In the air conditioned air.  "bought air" as my wife calls it.  

Once the paint gets a bubble in it, you can get a knife corner under that and start working it off usually.  that's where wetting it seemed to help.  And when done, will seal the bucket till next time.  

And yes, I plan to use Plastikote or Duplicolor primers and paint ass well.  I have read they work fine.  

Good luck.

Edited by randyc

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I've said this before, but I'll say it again (having worked in the diecast miniature car industry (product development for Johnny Lightning), having stripped several diecasts--avoid Purple Power--it will damage anything with aluminum in it!  Diecasts are made from ZAMAC, which is an alloy that contains aluminum--in fact, we use Purple Power to strip the "chrome plating" from plated model car kit parts.   Zamak also contains zinc, which corrodes as well.

I strongly recommend "Aircraft Grade" paint stripper, which is widely available--it's sold for stripping paint off of non-ferrous metals such as Zamak--and won't damage the metal.  Simply brush the stuff on (wearing protective rubber gloves of course--it will burn skin), watch the paint bubble and blister up, then rinse with water and strub any stubborn paint away.

For painting, use a "Self Etching" primer, which is sold by the likes of Duplicolor, for paint adhesion on non-ferrous metals such as aluminum and diecast.  This primer will give you great adhesion, and can be painted over which pretty much any brand or type of paint you are likely to use on a model car.

Art

Edited by Art Anderson

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