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Three old Texaco stations + a little surprise

5 posts in this topic

Posted

While hunting for old ads in the 1961 Raton, NM high school yearbook, I came across this page:

ranm61-56.thumb.jpg.955c30dca6286bd5759f

A lot of difference for three stations in the same town.

Now for the fun part. Check out the ad signs in the last photo for the now-legendary and VERY expensive 1/25 scale Buddy L Texaco station for only $3.50 - and there's a built example of the kit visible in the window between the second and third pumps!

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Posted

Thanks for posting this great pictures!!!

daverd

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Posted

Ah,...the neighborhood service station...such a great part of a simpler time. I remember when I was just a little kid, Dad would pull into the neighborhood service station, ( a Standard Oil, I believe ), and there was a guy everybody knew by his first name working there, who would greet you with a cheerfull "hello, fill 'her up?..". Back then, the attendants wore white uniforms and a cap, many times a bow tie, and they checked everything...battery, coolant level, oil, tire pressure, washed the windshield, offered to empty the ashtray for you, looked at the wiper blades, and did all of that in minutes. You could get free maps of the city or state in the lobby. Restrooms were maintained, should you require their useage.  When the car was done being re-fueled, as the attendant gave you your receipt or change, you usually got S&H green stamps, or blue chip stamps back, and, there was always some kind of promotion that, if you filled it up, you could get a free tumbler, steak knife, whatever, and you could collect an entire set after time. these stations generally were on all major corners, and many were open 24 hours. Air and water, at the pump island, was free. I even had a bicycle tire flat patched for free by the local gas station guy, and that was not uncommon. Weren't people wonderfull back then?

In High School, being that I was into cars, it should come as no surprise that my first job was in a gas station, a 76 Union..........loved that job too......

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Posted

My first job in 1968 was at a Texaco station in Oak Lawn, Ill. 87 th. and Oak Park. It was a fun job except in the winter months.

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Posted

As an aside, because I always find this stuff interesting, here's what those stations look like now.

 

421 South 2nd: still a gas station, but not quite as attractive.

gs-421.thumb.png.097c1255cc7a42932e3aa9a

 

400 South 2nd: not a gas station.

gs-400.thumb.jpg.01b92d2fd922575352f3d77

 

200 Canyon Drive: I guess it's technically still a Texaco station.

gs-200.thumb.jpg.2524a9ea51000cf79c08bb2

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